New Guy im sure this has been beat, but I need help

New Guy im sure this has been beat, but I need help

This is a discussion on New Guy im sure this has been beat, but I need help within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Like the title says, I need help. I need a nice concealable pistol. I have 600$ to spend, any recommendations on something that will be ...

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  1. #1
    New Member Array goodie85's Avatar
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    New Guy im sure this has been beat, but I need help

    Like the title says, I need help. I need a nice concealable pistol. I have 600$ to spend, any recommendations on something that will be good, reliable, accurate, and concealable pistol? Preferably .45 or .40. Ive tried doing the research to find the best bang for my buck, but quite frankly I have no idea where to begin, Ive held multiple and a lot feel very comfortable but I just don't know how reliable/accurate they are, and no gun dealer is going to tell me they aren't. Thank you in advance I appreciate it.


  2. #2
    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Glock 27. Nothing else comes close. Reliable, light, .40, highly accessorize-able, accurate, plenty of carry options.
    Badey, ExGM, grouse and 1 others like this.

  3. #3
    Member Array Curzyk's Avatar
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    My best recommendation is to go to a range and rent various guns. Try them out and get a feel for them. Or, if you have friends that shoot handguns, try theirs out! After you have tried a bunch, narrow down your selection and try them again. Pick what you were accurate with and comfortable shooting. I honestly wouldn't recommend letting the price limit you too much. There are a variety of good guns below $600, but there are some real gems in the $600 - $900 range too. Trying a bunch out will help the most.

    Edited to remove unintended pun.

  4. #4
    Member Array usmcj's Avatar
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    This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike.


    Get some basic training FIRST. At this point you need fundamentals, not run and gun, or force on force. Reputable instructors will provide a host of handguns and holsters for you to experience in class. That will give you some idea of where your preferences might lead you in handgun selection. Then.....


    Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion... again....get some training......proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right. Most gun shops have a box of used holsters that you can experiment with after you've chosen what gun works best for you. There are many options for concealed/open carry.


    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.


    If you're buying a handgun for home protection, and you choose to NOT have it on your person, you should consider where in your home you might be if someone kicks the door in. I don't see a person in a position to be able to ask an intruder to "hang on a sec, while I get my gun"


    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil...I've known more than a few gents who didn't care for the recoil of what's often called a "ladies gun"... just sayin....
    NRA Life Member ... Marine Corps League Life Member
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  5. #5
    New Member Array goodie85's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by usmcj View Post
    This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike.


    Get some basic training FIRST. At this point you need fundamentals, not run and gun, or force on force. Reputable instructors will provide a host of handguns and holsters for you to experience in class. That will give you some idea of where your preferences might lead you in handgun selection. Then.....


    Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion... again....get some training......proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right. Most gun shops have a box of used holsters that you can experiment with after you've chosen what gun works best for you. There are many options for concealed/open carry.


    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.


    If you're buying a handgun for home protection, and you choose to NOT have it on your person, you should consider where in your home you might be if someone kicks the door in. I don't see a person in a position to be able to ask an intruder to "hang on a sec, while I get my gun"


    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil...I've known more than a few gents who didn't care for the recoil of what's often called a "ladies gun"... just sayin....

    I have all the training on guns I need to carry. This isn't my first pistol, It is however my first concealed weapon. I have a smith and Wesson judge that was given to me by my father, that I use on the farm quite a bit. Multiple friends and I shoot a lot, and ive felt their pistols (1911's, glocks, XDs, etc.) But ive never researched em and Ive seen each one of my buddies miss feed which is why I ask here. Im more into my .308 ar than anything and its all ive really researched, I should have worded my first post different by saying I have no idea because there are SOOOOO many concealable pistols out there. I know how to use a gun Ive used guns since I was 8 years old, hunting, and shooting cans in the field. I do have a couple ideas on what I kind of want though, 1911 (not sure on what make?) have a buddy with a glock 30 that felt nice and shot well but I just don't know. Its a lot of dough to throw around with no idea

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array maxwell97's Avatar
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    Welcome!

    One thing to keep in mind if you're on a strict budget is that, in addition to the gun, you'll need substantial amounts of the ammo you intend to carry in it, to test it out. Keep that in mind when pricing them.

    Here's a list of a few options in those calibers to get you started. Any of these can be considered reliable and accurate, some more than others of course, but all acceptable. These are also on the small side.

    Glock 23, 27, 30, or 36
    Smith and Wesson M&P 40C, M&P Shield (in .40)
    Springfield Armory XDs
    Ruger SR40c
    Beretta Storm subcompact

    Those are just a few, but it's a place to start looking, anyway. I'd also suggest checking a few good sources for reviews, my preferences being gunblast.com and the YouTube videos of Hickok45. And a very good book is the Gun Digest Book of Concealed Carry by Massad Ayoob. It says a bit about guns and a lot about everything else you want to know about carrying.
    NONAME762 likes this.
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  7. #7
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    The Glock 19 and S&W9c are the two compacts I recommend: reliable; decent capacity; accurate; easy to handle and easy to conceal. Since S&W has recently began distributing the improved trigger on the M&P, there is even more to like about it.
    TX expat likes this.
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  8. #8
    Member Array sawfiler's Avatar
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    +1 on Glock 27 should have money left to buy a box of ammo.

  9. #9
    Member Array usmcj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodie85 View Post
    I have all the training on guns I need to carry. This isn't my first pistol, It is however my first concealed weapon. I have a smith and Wesson judge that was given to me by my father, that I use on the farm quite a bit. Multiple friends and I shoot a lot, and ive felt their pistols (1911's, glocks, XDs, etc.) But ive never researched em and Ive seen each one of my buddies miss feed which is why I ask here. Im more into my .308 ar than anything and its all ive really researched, I should have worded my first post different by saying I have no idea because there are SOOOOO many concealable pistols out there. I know how to use a gun Ive used guns since I was 8 years old, hunting, and shooting cans in the field. I do have a couple ideas on what I kind of want though, 1911 (not sure on what make?) have a buddy with a glock 30 that felt nice and shot well but I just don't know. Its a lot of dough to throw around with no idea
    You only have two options... you let someone else's preferences dictate your purchase, or you choose according to your own preferences. You either dress around your firearm, or you buy a firearm to suit your given mode of dress. Any handgun can misfeed, and when it occurs, it's quite often the fault of the shooter, such as limp-wristing. Regardless of the firearms suggested, if it's not comfortable to YOU.... well, I've been there already....

    Best of luck in your search.
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    VIP Member Array NONAME762's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxwell97 View Post
    Those are just a few, but it's a place to start looking, anyway. I'd also suggest checking a few good sources for reviews, my preferences being gunblast.com and the YouTube videos of Hickok45. And a very good book is the Gun Digest Book of Concealed Carry by Massad Ayoob. It says a bit about guns and a lot about everything else you want to know about carrying.
    I crack up every time I watch one of Hickok45's videos. That lucky puppy has a beautiful piece of property complete with private range!! Woo Hoo!! I seriously LOVE that Kel Tec 14+1 12G but right out of the box they're too much of a JAM-O-MATIC....
    maxwell97 likes this.
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    New Member Array goodie85's Avatar
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    I have 100$ out of the price to purchase ammo and I get a paycheck each week 600$ is a ballpark figure to what I want for a pistol. Not worried on ammo as I should have plenty left to purchase ammo. I will take a look at the glock 27 tonight at the local gun dealer. Also I didn't even realize my buddy has a S&W M&P that I actually really enjoyed. Shot 25ish rounds through that and enjoyed it. so far I feel my options are either the glock 27 or "other", or a S&W M&P .40. I think Im going to hold off a 1911, mainly because when I get one of them I want it to be a very nice one.
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  12. #12
    Distinguished Member Array Fitch's Avatar
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    Glock 19, 26 or the M&P Shield 9mm. I own two 19s and a 26. I used to own a Shield but it wasn't enough easier to conceal than the 26 so I sold it.

    The three properties of a concealed carry gun that matter:
    1. The gun must go off every time you pull the trigger. It must never go off when you don't pull the trigger.
    2. You must be able to conceal it well enough that you always have it with you where ever it's legal. The perfect gun in the ideal caliber, left at home, is worthless.
    3. Ideally, you need to shoot it well enough to hit a dinner plate at arms length to 21' with 2 shots in 2.5 seconds drawing from concealment. Faster is better if there is no loss in accuracy. Caliber is largely irrelevant if it's 9mm or heavier. Shot placement is what counts.

    The gun in your hand when you need a gun is the perfect gun. Everything else is just fluff.

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  13. #13
    Member Array guitarzNgunz's Avatar
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    Glock 27 or a Smith & Wesson M&P 40c which is what I prefer and carry myself. Another great option if you prefer 45acp is the M&P 45c which is next on my list of guns to buy. If your looking for more concealable try the M&P Shield in 40.

    Stay safe.
    Luke 22:36,38 Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.
    38 And they said, Lord, behold, here are two swords. And he said unto them, It is enough.

  14. #14
    New Member Array MajorMalfunct's Avatar
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    Lots of good advice here. Let me add a bit more: your concealed carry weapon is a very personal choice. My choice is great for me, but that doesn't mean it's great for you. Concealability depends on body size/type, usual manner of dress, occupation, normal daily activities, where you live, preferred method of carry (shoulder, ankle, OWB, IWB, etc.).

    You also say want to stay in a larger caliber (.40 or .45) eschewing 9mm which is a popular and effective choice. And you want reliability (who doesn't?), which indicates you are thinking auto versus revolver (because people usually only reference reliability when they talk about autos).

    In today's market, $600 can get a quality (meaning reliable and accurate) weapon from a number of manufacturers. Choose a well known manufacturer and a popular model and use high quality ammo, and you should be OK. With semi-autos reliability is in part manufacture, and in large part owner operation. Learn how to run your gun, whichever you choose.

    I suggest you do not put the cart before the horse. If you first decide how you will comfortably carry and how you will effectively conceal, then you can pick the largest, best quality weapon that you can draw and shoot quickly and accurately, while allowing you to carry and conceal comfortably.

    I most often carry a Glock 23. It's a compact .40 cal. but it is a bit large for concealed carry. Nonetheless, I carry it OWB on my right hip, about midway between 3 and 4 o'clock position and don't have any concealment issues. I just let my shirt or jacket cover it and I'm good to go. I've been carrying a weapon for more than 40 years so I don't even notice it. I practice regularly and qualify annually. I can run my gun and clear malfunctions (they are really, really, really rare), and I can draw from concealment and hit my target quickly, easily, accurately and repeatedly. That's what makes the weapon reliable and accurate and good for me to carry.

    Let us know what you choose.

  15. #15
    Distinguished Member Array Once's Avatar
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    It's been said before, rent as many as you can.
    Good Luck and post pics when you buy one

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