Shooting an Airweight 38

Shooting an Airweight 38

This is a discussion on Shooting an Airweight 38 within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Just purchased a S&W 38 Airweight. At the range I found myself pulling my shots to the left (I am right handed). Realized I was ...

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Thread: Shooting an Airweight 38

  1. #1
    Member Array fffabiano's Avatar
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    Shooting an Airweight 38

    Just purchased a S&W 38 Airweight. At the range I found myself pulling my shots to the left (I am right handed). Realized I was putting the trigger in the crease of my finger. When I adjusted my finger, problem went away. Took my wife to the range and she had the same problem of pulling to the left, but she shoots left handed, so I would have thought she should be pulling to the right. I'm confused. Any explanations? Thank you.


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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    You should be putting the trigger in the crease of your finger if you are referring to your first distal joint. That is how revolvers and guns with heavy triggers are shot. That is how I have learned to do it 40 years ago and how Mas Ayoob teaches it. Your problem is typical and experienced by many. You are simply pushing the trigger to the left rather than straight back. With some practice you will learn how to pull the trigger straight back with it between your distal joint. It is not hard to learn. Of course, you can shoot it just using the pad of our trigger finger like I do with a 1911 but using your distal joint provides more power and makes the trigger feel lighter. The real test is if you can fire rapidly because most times, using the distal joint allows you to pull the trigger more rapidly than using the pad of your finger.
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    Member Array Hoodoo's Avatar
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    I predominantly shoot DAO pistols, when I first started shooting, it came natural to me to shoot with my crease but my shots were all right of target and I had a heavy pull to the right.(I'm right handed). I adjusted to using the tip of my finger and shoot much better and get a much straighter pull.

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    This sounds familiar. I thought the sights of my Model 37 Smith were off, until I asked the RSO to shoot it, and he put 5 in the ten ring without trying. These guns are so light they magnify every little error. I still love them, though.
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    VIP Member Array ShooterGranny's Avatar
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    If you don't have unlimited ammunition and range time, here is a thought:

    Dry fire a few hundred times and pay really close attention to what the front sight is doing every time you pull the trigger. I'm in process of getting my trigger pull "just right" with a S&W model 60 that I recently acquired. It is definitely not a featherweight, but the process should work the same way.

    And yes, the lighter weight sure does magnify any little error! A laser can also help a lot with this dry fire training process.

    Oh yeah - follow ALL the procedures for safe dry firing. Every time.
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    Senior Member Array Camjr's Avatar
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    I tend to shoot my 642 to the left if I use the tip of my index finger-it pushes the gun. Things straighten out when I use the crease of my distal knuckle. Much easier for me to make a straight trigger press.
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    Member Array fffabiano's Avatar
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    Very Helpful

    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Printed out both and will take them to the range. Excellent info. Thank you

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    Member Array Skidboot's Avatar
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    Not in direct response to your question, but one of the best things you can do to improve shootability (and accuracy) is to install an Apex trigger. It's still a DAO revolver, but it's a much easier pull. You can easily do the installation yourself.

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    I recently got my new 642 back from S&W warranty repair (fireing pin). While it was there I had them do a trigger job. My guess is the trigger was lightened by about 30% and is smooth as butter. I only say this because the first time I took it to the range and shot 100 rounds of 158 grain I was surprised how accurate I was with the gun. My only prior revolver experience was my 686+. With the 642 I was shooting paper plate groups at 10 yards and 4 inch groups at 5 yards shooting at 5 shots in 5 seconds. It was amazing the gun just naturally went back to POA after recoil. It truely felt like an extension of my hand.

    Other than the trigger job I also got it with the crimson trace LG 305, oversized rubber grip. They make the gun a joy to shoot. I could have went for another 100 rounds if the ammo was free.

    The cheapest way to improve your pull is to do a redneck trigger job. Last night I dry fired the 642 probably over 1000 times. I have a nice blister on my trigger finger today. Sometimes it is you and not the gun that needs to be broken in.

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    IMHO, stop taking those small splash targets to the range an shoot snubs at them trying to hit the bullseye and getting discouraged when you miss 4 to 5 inches either way. Take a half man silhouette an practice drawing an hitting center mass at 7 feet than move out to 15 feet than 25 feet. Try weak hand an than strong hand. A good action job will help make range time more enjoyable, polish an round the trigger face your significant other will be very happy.
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