686 Neglect

686 Neglect

This is a discussion on 686 Neglect within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; image.jpg [ATTACH=CONFIG]89696[/ATTACH ]So I'm hoping y'all can tell me how to get the "tarnish" off the trigger & hammer of a S&W 686? I know ...

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    686 Neglect

    image.jpg[ATTACH=CONFIG]89696[/ATTACH
    ]So I'm hoping y'all can tell me how to get the "tarnish" off the trigger & hammer of a S&W 686? I know it's crazy that I own 2 nice revolvers & still have not shot either the Ruger LCR or 686. The 686 has been with us for 13 yrs now They were gifts, & my new-found interest in guns has me feeling ashamed the 686 has been so neglected. I'm going to try & rectify even though I'm a little intimated to shoot this big momma. Thanks for any help. I've attached a picture to show what I'm talking about.
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    Sorry if the attachments are posted double or wonky.

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    Distinguished Member Array Recon1342's Avatar
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    With a barrel that long, it'll be a pussycat. As for the trigger, dunno if S&W ever color case hardened parts, but those kinda look like it... Shoot it and have fun!
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    Member Array GetSmith's Avatar
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    20 minutes with some mothers mag polish and a microfiber cloth will have them looking better than new.

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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    The trigger looks to me like it got gummed up with run off oil. Id take a Q tip, and either some Hoppes #9 solvent, or Breakfree CLP, maybe even alcohol, and work on it. You really cant hurt the finish with any of those, and it would be a starting place.

    There are other harsher things you might try, but if it were my gun, I would only consider those as a last resort. Honestly, I wouldnt do it. Id take my time, using the stuff I mentioned, even if it did take lots longer. Though, I honestly dont think that the trigger clean up will be too bad.

    Its hard for me to tell about the rest of your weapon, from the pictures. But Id start on the trigger first. If it cleans up, Id bet that the same method would work on the rest of your weapon, and once again, it should not harm the finish.

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    VIP Member Array ShooterGranny's Avatar
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    The thumbnails will not open. You need to make the file sizes a lot smaller so they will open for viewing.

    Nothing intimidating about shooting a 686. The gun is large and heavy enough to absorb almost every smidgen of recoil.
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    It's difficult to tell from the photos, but it appears there may be some deposits on the trigger and hammer, as StormRhydr notes. The most I would do is apply Hoppe's with a q-tip to see if it cleans up.

    It could also be the case hardening (actual pattern, I think these are pre MIM parts on your gun). If that's the situation, then the variations are normal. Later MIM parts on Smiths are made to look case hardened. Either way, your hammer and trigger are not going to appear like "stainless" parts.
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    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
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    My brand spanking new Model 60's trigger looks just like that.

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    Here' an example of the coloration on a 40+ year old model 36:



    I have many more pics of various SW's, and most of them show very similar color patterns. I bet your trigger needs a little solvent to clean up some dried oil and you are good to go.
    -PEF, a Framer with a Steelie...
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    1. All guns are always loaded.
    2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Looks like case hardening to me.
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    You might want to leave your hammer and trigger alone. That's factory original color case hardening. People pay money to have that "look" restored to dulled out or aftermarket polished triggers and hammers in some instances if the revolver's collectors appeal warrants it. Model 686's aren't there yet but very well could be within a lifetime.

    Stormryder's Hoppe's soaked Q-tips are about the best suggestion for cleaning the surfaces of your hammer and trigger.

    Smith & Wesson finished some of their stainless steel revolver models with a solid silvery flashing over the normal carbon steel hammers and triggers. Some they left in the case hardened state you see on your revolver. Don't think Smith & Wesson ever actually fabricated hammers and triggers out of stainless steel.

    The MIM hammers and triggers now supplied by Smith & Wesson also can have a mottled look though its darker and more muted than the case hardened steel parts formerly provided.
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    Senior Member Array Hatrix's Avatar
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    I'm sorry to have to be the one to inform you of this. Your gun is ruined beyond any hope of restore or repair.

    If you wish I'll give you $50 for it as I would like to have it as a paperweight. I'll even pay for shipping charges to my FFL.


    Let me know

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    Distinguished Member Array coffeecup's Avatar
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    Leave it alone. It is just casehardening.

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    Member Array glockcoma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Looks like case hardening to me.
    It is just that;
    Color case hardening. It's done that way to keep the metal strong, it's NOT just a colorized finish. That's factory.
    Removing it, or trying to polish it out will deeply effect your value at resale, if you ever do.
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    Member Array GerryS's Avatar
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    I also have a 686. The best thing I have found to clean powder deposits, especially between the cylinder and barrel is that wadding that comes in a can. It's called "Nevr-Dull".

    Gerry
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