The Fightin' Revolver: Is it dying a slow death?

This is a discussion on The Fightin' Revolver: Is it dying a slow death? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by Euclidean Ruger still has some life in it but their catalog isn't that large. Their internal lock design is probably the best ...

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Thread: The Fightin' Revolver: Is it dying a slow death?

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
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    Question Ruger Trends

    Quote Originally Posted by Euclidean
    Ruger still has some life in it but their catalog isn't that large. Their internal lock design is probably the best yet. They make a few things very well, which I suppose is far better than making many things poorly. Truthfully if I bought a brand new revolver I'd lean heavily towards the Ruger models.

    I've started another thread, and thanks for the help by the way, looking for holsters for full size frames because I just could not find any!

    Why are they killing off the full sized revolver? Honestly it's like a conspiracy. I honestly feel that in 10 years I'll be using a DAO service pistol and my revolvers will sit in a safe, because the ammunition will be impossible to find and their collector's value will start climbing.
    As I mentioned in my last post, I'm thinking the new Alaskan may be the start of a new trend. 454/45LC is a hard combo to top especially if it's easily concealed and strong as Ruger's certainly are!

    As far as holsters, if you send a gun to Blade-Tech and they have no holster already in stock to match, they will give you the FIRST one free IF you let them use YOUR gun to make the mold. The guarantee not to damage your gun. It's a pretty good deal, IMHO.
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    You know what's funny Ex. Your comment made me go check Blade Tech's sight. They do in fact make a cross draw IWB holster for just about any wheelgun out there. Not all of them mind you but many of them.

    You get a cookie.

  4. #18
    Senior Member Array CombatEffective's Avatar
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    It's a shame. The revolver can be an effective combat tool in the hands of someone that knows how to use it. I think that the revolver will continue to fade, but I don't think that it will ever die. Plus, I think that .38/.357 ammo will outlive all of us on the market.

  5. #19
    Senior Member Array Prospector's Avatar
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    Being a movie nut of sorts, I've seen the transition from revolvers to semis in terms of the Dirty Harry series in the 70's...boy what that movie did for S&W sales.....then the 80's came along with Death Wish series (still revolver), then the Lethal Weapon series hit in the 80's with the ole Beretta 9mm...followed by Dirty Harry and the .44 Mag AutoMag, and Bronson with the Wildey .475 (I still want one of those).....semis seemed to just be the cats meow and considering the media hype about gangbangers and MAC-10s and UZI's....the push for more "fire power" became the norm....more rds per second, more rds period. I think the media lost the basic issue of "marksmanship" vs "populate the air with as many bullets as possible".....that's why I also like movies such as Sniper....one shot, one kill.
    "Endeavor To Persevere"
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  6. #20
    JT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Euclidean
    LOL

    What's that quote from Patton?

    "They're not pearl grips they're ivory. Only a new Orleans pimp carries a pearl handled pistol."

    Or something like that.

    I'd only nickle plate a revolver I didn't plan on using very much. A basic brushed stainless finish not only looks good to me personally, but it's easy to keep up.

    I like nickle and hard chrome and bright super polished stainless finishes and I admit wood grips look better too, but for a gun I'm actually going to use for something I'll go with basic stainless and a black rubber grip. That in itself has its own pleasing aesthetic quality. It says "Use me".
    My brother has a Ruger in 44 Magnum. I keep telling him to replace the wood grips with rubber, but he won't. He likes the look too much.
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  7. #21
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Doesn't he realize you can use one set for shooting and another set for presentation?

    Seriously a rubber Hogue grip on a revolver is one of the best things since sliced bread. I have yet to find another format that molds to the hand better.

  8. #22
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by JT
    My brother has a Ruger in 44 Magnum. I keep telling him to replace the wood grips with rubber, but he won't. He likes the look too much.
    Wood on that gun IS awesome looking....if you don't actually shoot it very much.
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  9. #23
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    Bond....James Bond. Have you a Walther PPKs? The ultimate movie gun. I think, actually that it's been around the longest. Granted Pierce Brosnan seems to have gone to the BIGGER Walther.....but still....
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  10. #24
    JT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Euclidean
    Doesn't he realize you can use one set for shooting and another set for presentation?

    Seriously a rubber Hogue grip on a revolver is one of the best things since sliced bread. I have yet to find another format that molds to the hand better.
    Agreed. I wouldn't go without rubber grips on any revolver, let alone a 44 Magnum.

    I only have one revolver. A S&W 642. Great light weight gun. I love my Glock 26 for a sub-compact size, but it is too heavy for a coat pocket. It also won't fit in my jeans pocket like my 642. So the 642 gets the nod on certain sotuations when even my Glock 26 is too bulky.
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExSoldier762
    Bond....James Bond. Have you a Walther PPKs? The ultimate movie gun. I think, actually that it's been around the longest. Granted Pierce Brosnan seems to have gone to the BIGGER Walther.....but still....
    I had a Walther PP for a while. Had Nazi markings on it. It was 32 though, so I got rid of it. If I'm going to have a 32 it needs to be mouse size like my NAA Guardian.
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  12. #26
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    To be honest, I think the Bersas are a big refinement on the PPK design, but maybe the modern PPKs incorporate these changes. I don't pay much attention to PPKs. I'd think though that a gun with the Bersa design and Walther craftsmanship would carve out a niche market for itself.

    My dad likes PPKs for no good reason. I think it's a neat design for a compact .380 that will never die.

  13. #27
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    Just A Note On Nickel Plating

    Remember that the Electroless Nickel Plating of today is FAR DIFFERENT than the decorative bright nickel plating of yesteryear.
    Modern Electroless Nickel forms a molecular bond with the substrate metal and cannot flake or peel. It is almost as hard as chrome.

  14. #28
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    Question Finishes

    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter
    Remember that the Electroless Nickel Plating of today is FAR DIFFERENT than the decorative bright nickel plating of yesteryear.
    Modern Electroless Nickel forms a molecular bond with the substrate metal and cannot flake or peel. It is almost as hard as chrome.
    That's true. I once had a Python with a four inch bbl in electroless nickel. Ugliest gun I've ever owned. Sturdy, true. But I'll take the state of the art finishes like ROBAR's NP3 and ROGARD. I have an M1A with the NP3 interior and ROGARD exterior. When the two metal surfaces bear together, they peel molecules off. Thus they are self lubricating. NO lube is needed. Fire, and simply wipe off. Good as NIB. There are other similar finishes out there, but I think the Robbie Barkman's shop produces the BEST.
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  15. #29
    Member Array George Hill's Avatar
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    I think the tactical application of a medium to large sized revolver is highly under rated. Most shooters think of revolvers in terms of small .38 back up guns, and large over powered wheel guns are just hunting pieces, and single actions are just for guys in boots and big hats.

    One of the most common phrases I hear at gun shops and online in discussion forums is “Just get a Glock”. This off the cuff remark really makes me question the intellect of the speaker. Not everyone wants a Glock and a Glock is certainly not necessarily the answer to every question. Yes, I think Glocks are just fine guns for some applications, but they leave a lot to be desired… wood grips for one thing. What did people carry, and how did man kind survive before Gaston Glock saved the universe?

    Most police departments carried revolvers… mostly .357 Magnums, and did so with good effect. Some may argue that, but everyone has their own opinion.

    A revolver has a greater power potential than an automatic, and a greater accuracy potential as well. Revolvers are capable of putting a powerful, heavy, hard hitting slug on target, with rapidity, at longer rangers than most service grade automatics. Revolvers are capable of firing a greater variety of ammunition without effecting reliability than an automatic as well.

    This gives the revolver potential tactical advantages that are not lost on those willing to open there eyes to see it… and if have ever in your life said “Just get a Glock”, you probably have not seen it. Undoubtedly MadOgre.com readers are astute enough to have seen it, so I am not worried about offending anyone here. The US Navy SEALs sometimes use .357 Magnum revolvers on a mission. This makes me curious about that missions nature that made them want to use a revolver over the automatic, but if they are doing it, then there is a tactical reason.

    The .357 Magnum has a great following, but the platform from which they are launched offers other choices… such as the .41 Magnum, .45LC, and .44 Magnum. These can offer huge take down ability, rivaling a rifle… But then there is my new pet caliber… the old mostly forgotten .44 Special. When the .44 Magnum hit the scene and especially thanks to the Dirty Harry movies, the .44 Special just went Bye-Bye. Some makers still rolled out a few guns for .44 Special… but for the most part it just faded away. Kinda like the even older .44 that the Special improved upon, the .44 Russian.

    I have to admit that I have really fallen for the .44 Special cartridge. It can be loaded as mild as vanilla, or as hot as habeneros, with slug weights from 165 to 300 grains. This gives you a wide ballistic spectrum to play around in… one that even enters into the lower portion of the .44 Magnum spectrum. It’s almost a shame that the .44 Special has been so overlooked… it virtually dropped off the planet once the .44 Mag rolled out because the Special was “obsolete” as many have said. I don’t think any cartridge is really ever obsolete… less commercially viable is a different matter altogether and popularity has nothing to do with effectiveness. I think the F-20 Tigershark was a fantastic jet fighter… but since the Air Force didn’t buy any, it flopped. Too bad… I liked it better than I do the F-16, but that’s another story. Rum Raisin. Awesome icecream flavor that you never really find in a ½ gallon carton at the store. If you want it, most of the time you have to go to an icecream shop and then only to the ones that offer a wide variety of choices… but this doesn’t reduce the enjoyment of the Rum Raisin’s flavor… or does it? Does the popularity of a think play some effect on our perception of the quality of the item? To some people it really does. To me, not a bit. When I was younger, all my friends were getting into smoking weed. They enjoyed it. It was popular and cool. I tried it. I inhaled. I didn’t like it, so I didn’t do it. Popularity or not. During school I took music classes and could play any of the Brass instruments, any of the horns. But the one I liked the most was the *ahem* French Horn. To my ears it had the best sound… the best tone… it was almost creamy when everything else sounded like it had freezer burn to use the flavor context again. I still think that today. Popularity has nothing to do with effectiveness or quality, and my last case in point on that matter is Brittany Spears’ music.

    This lack of popularity has created a downside to .44 Special, and that is in price and availability. I can find .44 Magnums and .45 Long Colt all over the place. I can’t find any around here save for one flavor of it, and it’s expensive. I’m looking at $1.10 per round here. If I fire the gun dry, that’s $5.50. Plus tax. Needless to say, you empty a cylinder, you have just eaten your Happy Meal, because that was your lunch money right there. Of course this is a locally inflated price, but by the time I pay for shipping, I might as well buy it local anyways and not have to wait for a delivery.

    All is not lost. I have access to a fully equipped reloading bench, which I have yet to take advantage of, but will at the end of this semester. It’s good equipment. Solid. Good condition… but old. It’s not the new progressive style that does everything with one pull of a handle. But this is just fine. I’m shooting a 5 shot and a 6 shot revolver and I don’t have to worry about filling up a 30 round magazine. This is plenty good enough for me, because my tastes are changing… just like my taste in Bikes. I enjoy the ride for the ride, if you know what I mean… I don’t have to attack the road and blitz the curves to enjoy it. I can just enjoy the whole reloading process and the art of reloading. I used this equipment before and found it to be an experience worth savoring. My friend Steve has progressive press and one day I went over and used it for awhile, and I was amazed at how you crank the handle, boom, there is a round. Fast. But it really didn’t give me the satisfaction that had felt before using the old fashioned methods. There is really nothing else like it… I can’t explain it. I’m looking forward to reloading when I can devote some time to it. Reloading by hand, I can get the cost down to about 6 or 7 cents a round… so the economic advantage (not counting time) becomes great. But the real reason I am itching to reload the .44Special… Most of the loads I have seen are loaded to meet specs from a 4 to 5 inch barreled gun. I have a 3 inch. And there are other little revolvers that I like that have even shorter barrels. I want to work up an ideal .44 Special Snub load… now if I can just find a chronograph to borrow…

    The tactical applications of revolvers maybe have become more specialized now, but they are there. Ammunition flexibility, accuracy, reliability, no ejecting cases… all features of a revolver that give it specialized applications that can be a tactical advantage over an automatic.
    I wrote this some time ago, and I think it is still applicable.

  16. #30
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Heck yeah! That's what I'm going on about!

    I mean honestly, why is the industry trying to appease the mall ninja?

    What are we going to lose next? The bolt action rifle?

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