Snubs - shell-shucking

Snubs - shell-shucking

This is a discussion on Snubs - shell-shucking within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; While we are on snubs elsewhere - the one thing I have always been aware of it - short barrel - and so short eject ...

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Thread: Snubs - shell-shucking

  1. #1
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    Snubs - shell-shucking

    While we are on snubs elsewhere - the one thing I have always been aware of it - short barrel - and so short eject rod. Freeing off five empties - reliably - has always seemed less than easy. Sure - actuate ejector vigorously but - often at least one case hangs up.

    I can reload pretty quick with a #36 loader, or Comp 1 but - heck - if the empties ain't all out - it's a no go deal!

    Anyone have any good fixes for this - special techniques?

    Give me a 686 and I am fast - well - fast enough but - snub ''J'' - yikes!
    Chris - P95
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    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


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  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Personally when I'm using a premium ammunition with a slick casing, I've never found the short rod to be a problem unless I've been on some kind of marathon shooting session.

    If my gun's clean and it's good ammunition, I'm good to go it seems.

    To be honest, with a snub, I view it as my "better than nothing" gun, or my "Get the heck off of me!" gun, or my "Instant Reload" gun. I do practice using speedloaders with my full size revolver but I don't even own a speedloader for my snubnose.

    I practice with the speedstrip however. I guess I didn't answer your question, but that's just been my experience. I don't get cases sticking unless I'm shooting practice ammunition and I've had 15 rounds through it already.

    Let's be honest. When are we going to sit there in a gunfight and fire 50 rounds out of our snubnoses?

    Also, I tilt the revolver a little when I push the rod in. This does point the muzzle at a 25-45 degree angle, but it's still downrange, and let's be honest, with the cylinder swung out to the side it's going to be okay. Gravity may be the other part of the equation.

    I personally feel, and you may criticize me for this, the snubnose revolver is the "85%er". The numbers tell us that the vast majority of bad things that happen to people happen at extremely close ranges. This is place where a really short gun is not that big of a disadvantage and in fact may be advantageous. And in how many Armed Citizen Success stories are people victorious with such a gun? Odds are a lot of these people wished they practiced more too. I feel three .38 slugs are going to ruin your day the vast majority of the time especially when one of them is in your neck or eye.

    I think you should carry a bigger gun and use the snub as a backup whenever possible but that can't be all the time for a lot of us.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array rfurtkamp's Avatar
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    It's one of the reasons I like the titanium cylinders on my .44 - ejection has always been painless to the extreme.

    On my other revolvers, I wouldn't reload them under stress unless there was no other option - it's not going to be quick, it's going to be filled with mistakes, and I should have brought another mag for the auto.
    Driver carries less than $45 worth of remorse.

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    Senior Member Array jdsumner's Avatar
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    Hey Euc,
    when emptying a revolver, do you use the technique whereby you push the thumblatch with your right (firing) thumb, push the cylinder out with the middle 2 fingers of your left (support) hand, release the right hand to grasp loader, and use left hand, middle two fingers holding cylinder, to point muzzle up, left thumb to press ejector rod down? This technique works for me, and if the cases stick, I can finish a) pulling them out with my right hand, b) shake well, c) use palm of right hand to 'smack' ejector rod as needed. Then, using loaders, strips or speed-, the left hands 2 fingers and thumb now control the cylinder during a reload.

    Dan

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    Naturally whatever speeds up your ejection & reloading of any revolver is a worthwhile thing to do.
    Next time you go shooting mark whichever one sticks on your cylinder with a Sharpie marker & check to see if it's the same cylinder hole that a cartridge case is always hanging up in.
    Sometimes it's always the same chamber.
    If so then have that one cylinder hole corrected.
    also...Use Nickel plated brass.
    You can also use a "felt bob" in a Dremel tool with some ultra~fine jewelers rouge & very lighty buff the interiors of the cylinder holes.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    I have a bad habit of loading with the support hand. Your method is probably better. I personally have a habit of pushing the rob back with my middle finger for some reason when I should probably be using my thumb. It goes something like retrieve speedloader, hold in left thumb, release cylinder with right thumb, open cylinder with middle two fingers on left hand, depress rod, line up two catridges, insert speedloader, drop speedloader, close cylinder. The reason I do it this way is that I try to practice this with my light in my hand and I found this to be the only way I could hold onto my light and reload the gun at the same time.

    The other technique I've seen is to release and open with the right hand only, but that's so darn awkward I don't think anyone could really expect to do it under any kind of stress. I don't think that's a good method at all.

    I think they all have their place though. It's the same reason I try to use multiple stance: you don't know what position you are going to be standing in when something bad happens. You may be in some bass ackwards spot and have to improvise, or as I mentioned you might have a light in your hand. You can't just drop your light if you're in the dark. It may be more important than the gun.

    I'm going to take a class later this summer hopefully and I think I'll ask about how to best approach this problem. Maybe it's better to temporarily hold the light between the middle fingers of the shooting hand and do as you described.

  7. #7
    Member Array George Hill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdsumner
    Hey Euc,
    when emptying a revolver, do you use the technique whereby you push the thumblatch with your right (firing) thumb, push the cylinder out with the middle 2 fingers of your left (support) hand, release the right hand to grasp loader, and use left hand, middle two fingers holding cylinder, to point muzzle up, left thumb to press ejector rod down? This technique works for me, and if the cases stick, I can finish a) pulling them out with my right hand, b) shake well, c) use palm of right hand to 'smack' ejector rod as needed. Then, using loaders, strips or speed-, the left hands 2 fingers and thumb now control the cylinder during a reload.

    Dan

    That is almost correct. But you go straight to "C" right off the bat. Up end the gun and smack the ejector. All empties will jump out and you then reload promptly. This is the way you do any double action revolver.

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    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    It's really hard to describe the exact motion over the internet. It's more of an "I know what you meant" kind of thing.

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    Thx for all the input. I don't think I have been doing anything wrong over the years - I am pretty much with Dan and George. I also have usually induced some cyl' spin as ejecting - in hopes of easing all empties out.

    True too - in snubland I'd not be reckoning to consider reloads too often - just that it seems useful to have it licked ''in case''.

    My prob has usually been involving the empty closest to frame - it is this position where a slight hang up can be most obvious - to the extent that I sometimes want to reduce grip profile below cyl' latch - to ensure greater clearance.

    Thx again folks - all input is as always warmly appreciated.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  10. #10
    Member Array preacherman's Avatar
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    I've had a number of revolvers converted to moonclip configuration, and this has greatly speeded up reloading (and eliminated the problem of leaving an odd case behind!). Since all the cases are linked, you drop 'em in together, and they come out together. You can still use individual rounds, since there is an outer rim left on each chamber on which the rim of the cartridge can space.

    See www.moonclips.com for more details, and a list of gunsmiths that do the conversion. Highly recommended.

  11. #11
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    Tempting Peter - very tempting. I know with my 625 I can dump all 6 in an instant.

    I guess, with the snubs - I just wanna get better at the dump. Heck - if I had $5 for every comp dump with 686 years ago - I'd retire for good!

    Much to me still revolves around the amount of ''impedance'' presented by the top of left grip panel.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

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