Glock Slide Release Question - Page 2

Glock Slide Release Question

This is a discussion on Glock Slide Release Question within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by Taurus111 I am an EMT and I lose my fine motor skills under extreme stress. I can only imagine trying to use ...

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Thread: Glock Slide Release Question

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taurus111 View Post
    I am an EMT and I lose my fine motor skills under extreme stress. I can only imagine trying to use them when you are trying to reload and someone is shooting back.
    Not being a smart A, but that's a training issue. BTDT, started the 14 gauges to prove it.

    PA, I believe you'll be happy, AeroTek makes the most user-friendly, functional, slide release for Glocks. I got one when AeroTek first came on the market, and have made them a standard with any new additions.


  2. #17
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
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    On my Glock 34 the slide releases when I slam the mag in.
    Works for me, it's fast and less actions.

  3. #18
    Member Array PAExplorer's Avatar
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    I see. Good info. Still want the extension though.
    Never criticize a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes...that way, when you criticize him, you're a mile away and you have his shoes.

  4. #19
    Member Array glocksmygun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAExplorer View Post
    understood, but I'd still like it to work better.
    I had the same problem with my G30. An extended slide release is the best thing to cure this problem. They are not very expensive and any armorer can put one in in about 2 seconds.

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    On my Glock 34 the slide releases when I slam the mag in.
    Works for me, it's fast and less actions.
    Pete is talking about the sporadic Glock Advantage. Some will do it, some won't. It depends on the individual pistol, and may change with changes in springs. Cool when you have it.

  6. #21
    Senior Member Array jualdeaux's Avatar
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    Shoot. You don't even really need to be an armourer. I just watched the armourer at the local shows a couple of times and I can fix and replace anything on my pistols. With the exception of the sights. I do not have the proper sight pusher to install every set of after market sights out there.

  7. #22
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob72 View Post
    Pete is talking about the sporadic Glock Advantage. Some will do it, some won't. It depends on the individual pistol, and may change with changes in springs. Cool when you have it.
    Mine's due for new springs, it's working fine and has been flawless for me but I've put about 2500 through it in the year since I got it... maybe more...

    As it's a G34 it has the extended release anyway, but I never use it, a tap on the base of the mag as I insert it and I'm good.

    You can't get faster than that and if new springs change it I will try and wear them in ASAP.

  8. #23
    Senior Member Array Vaquero 45's Avatar
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    Squeezing the trigger is a fine motor skill. Lining up 3 dots to get a sight picture is a fine motor skill. Disengaging the safety on a 1911 is a fine motor skill. Depressing the mag release or doing a tactical reload is a fine motor skill.

    There are many fine motor skills involved in a gunfight. The important thing to remember is, you will fight the way you train. If every time you chamber a round, you do it by pressing the slide release, then that's what you will do in a gunfight. If you grab the slide and yank it back instead, then that is what you will do in a gunfight.

    I've have seen interviews with fellow officers that have actually been in gunfights, and what happens in the first few seconds is automatic. Most officers don't even realize they've responded until they've already lauched 2 or 3 rounds at the bad guy. Every motor skill involved in unsnapping a complicated level 3 security holster, drawing, obtaining sight picture, and firing was accomplished without thinking, in about 1 or 2 seconds.

    Don't worry about fine and gross motor skills. Pick the method that works best for you, and practice, practice, practice. It will all come back when you need it.
    Slow is smooth.....smooth is fast.

  9. #24
    Member Array Whyveear's Avatar
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    Well said.

  10. #25
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    John Farnam wrote something on the subject recently.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Farnam
    "Wrong," or just "Inferior?"

    Any weapon operational procedure, administrative or tactical, "works," to one degree or another. However, we instructors gravitate toward those methods that are (1) quickly learned/absorbed/practiced, (2) easy to teach, (3) forgiving, that is, the technique will "work," even when not done exactly right, (4) universal, that is, the technique is neither gun-specific nor situation-specific, and (5) can be accomplished with gross, body movements, rather than precise, finger movements.

    Complicated, unforgiving, gun/situation-specific techniques may look great in the movies, but, in the inadequate amount of time we have to work with students, they must come away with something that has at least some chance of being successful, even when they are involved in a gunfight that very night!

    An example is teaching students to close a locked-back pistol slide by depressing the slide lock/release lever. The technique "works," but the slide lock/release lever varies from pistol to pistol in both shape and location. Once you teach your thumb to sweep down the lever on a Glock, then you are subsequently compelled to use a SIG, you'll unhappily discover that the same lever on the SIG is in a location with which you are not acquainted. In addition, when the slide is forward on an empty chamber, depressing the lever, in any fashion, will accomplish precisely nothing! So, this technique is not only gun-specific. It is also situation-specific. Thus, not recommended!

    As such, the technique is not "wrong," but it is inferior to yanking the slide all the way back and then letting it go. That procedure involves only a gross, non-precise, body movement, will chamber a round on any pistol I know of, and the starting position of the slide will be irrelevant.

    I rarely accuse a technique of being "wrong," and, even thebest techniques, the ones we currently teach, are still not perfect. It is incumbent upon us instructors to identify the best of the best, even when we didn't personally invent any of it, always acknowledging that better methods are doubtless still yet to be discovered. Of course, we need to avoid superficial fads,but, in order to relentlessly advance our Art, which is our charge, we must instantly recognize genuine advances, no matter what their source, and be prepared to embrace them.

    "If thou would not be forgotten when dead and rotten Write something work reading, or read something worth writhing."

  11. #26
    VIP Member Array sass20485's Avatar
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    I've got extended slide stops on all my Glocks, work great, But, I usually just pull back on the slide and let it go. Installing one is rather simple. Be sure the weapon is clear by dropping the mag, checking the chamber. Strip off the slide, couple of pins to push out,take out the factory part, position the new part, push back the pins, put the slide back on, ready to go. Just note the position of the spring BEFORE taking out the factory part. That way you'll know how it should be, when you install the new part. Do it wrong and every time you fire a round the slide will lock open. Don't ask how I know this.

  12. #27
    Senior Member Array Vaquero 45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackeagle View Post
    John Farnam wrote something on the subject recently.
    I guess I'll have to be "inferior" then, because I'm 38 years old and have been dropping the slides on 1911's, S&W's, Rugers and Glocks for years, using the inferior slide release. The slide release is in about the same location in all of those makes. I do not own any Sigs, so I don't worry about where the slide release on those pistols is at.

    I wonder if John Farnam (whoever that is) thinks the 1911 is an "inferior" weapon, due to the fine motor skill required to disengage the safety prior to shooting? I'd bet I could find a boatload of "experts" that disagree.

    Slow is smooth.....smooth is fast.

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metro 40 View Post
    Squeezing the trigger is a fine motor skill. Lining up 3 dots to get a sight picture is a fine motor skill. Disengaging the safety on a 1911 is a fine motor skill. Depressing the mag release or doing a tactical reload is a fine motor skill.
    All those things do involve fine motor skills. Some of them, like trigger control and hitting the mag release, are unavoidable. Others can, and IMO should, be avoided. I've always released the slide by pulling back rather than using the slide release. In some recent force-on-force training I saw very well trained, highly experienced shooters fail to hit the safety of a 1911 on the first try. I managed to hit the safety on my USP every time I needed to, but the safety problems some of these folks were having was a factor in my switching over to the Glock. That gets rid of one fine motor skill. I'm in the process of training myself to tac reload by removing and pocketing the partially expended magazine before grabbing a fresh one. It takes a second or so longer, but there's much less chance of bobbling it than there is trying to hold two mags in the hand at the same time.

  14. #29
    Member Array Taurus111's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob72 View Post
    Not being a smart A, but that's a training issue. BTDT, started the 14 gauges to prove it.

    PA, I believe you'll be happy, AeroTek makes the most user-friendly, functional, slide release for Glocks. I got one when AeroTek first came on the market, and have made them a standard with any new additions.
    Rob, totally agree with you there, about the 14s and it being a training issue. I used to have major problems (rookie stuff) with fine motor skills and being nervous on calls. Now I can do it under stress. But, I have been under stress several several several times and only after that could I do it. Look back and I bet you will see the same thing. How many gun fights do anyone get in. Hopefully not enough for them to become commonplace enough to get used to fighting the adrenaline rush that comes with it. That all I was trying to get at.
    If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.
    --Thomas Paine December 19, 1776

    The probability that we may fail in the struggle ought not deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just.
    --Abraham Lincoln


    http://jmm.aaa.net.au/articles/13226.htm

  15. #30
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metro 40 View Post
    I wonder if John Farnam (whoever that is) thinks the 1911 is an "inferior" weapon, due to the fine motor skill required to disengage the safety prior to shooting? I'd bet I could find a boatload of "experts" that disagree.
    From what he's written, Farnam seems to be fairly pistol-agnostic. Off the top of my head, I know likes 1911s, SIGs, and Glocks. There are probably other models he favors as well.

    As for the "whoever he is" bit, I'd say he's in the top tier of defensive shooting instructors. He's definitely on my list of schools/instructors to train with. He also writes some pretty insightful stuff.

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