1911 vs revolver

This is a discussion on 1911 vs revolver within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I have and carry both. Things to keep in mind with a semi-auto pistol is that you have to take them through a break-in period ...

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Thread: 1911 vs revolver

  1. #16
    GPS
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    I have and carry both. Things to keep in mind with a semi-auto pistol is that you have to take them through a break-in period to make sure they are functioning dependably. You have to make sure that they will work with your intended carry ammunition. Some 1911's have trouble digesting hollow point ammo and certain brands of ammo (Wolf being one of the more problematic). After getting all that out the way, you need to still practice on how to handle a possible jam caused by improper grip (limp wristing the gun), feed problems with a magazine, etc.

    Revolvers are a lot less finicky than an auto-pistol, but some strange things can still go wrong once in a while. I have seen or heard of the following, but nowhere near as often as jams with auto-pistols - Anyone here ever have the ejector rod start to come loose? If it backs out, it can jam the cylinder to the point that you can't open it to eject spent rounds. (Happened to me one time at the range with a S&W Model 66.) Some of the light weight scandium frame revolvers have had problems when shooting magnum loads of having the unfired bullets unseat, move forward, and jam the cylinder.

    You just have to make sure how to operate what you choose to carry and make sure it works reliably.
    Cordially,
    GPS

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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array aus71383's Avatar
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    Since you're asking, I'd say start with a revolver. They are simpler to operate, which means you'll be proficient sooner and need less practice to stay that way. Both guns have their advantages - the main thing is can you draw and hit the target when you need to. JMO

    Austin

  4. #18
    New Member Array jpserra's Avatar
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    Newbie vs Experienced

    I carry both, for different reasons. This is the hardest part of answering the question. I always recommend a revolver to a newbie because the simplicity of the function. Someone who I KNOW has been a shooter and have evaluated as being capable and competent, then I may recommend an auto.

    A limp wrist at the wrong time will ruin your day. Adrenaline does different things to different people. I know my capabilities only after years of experience. As a former LEO, I had intense training on both marksmanship and the mental game that goes with the responsibility of carry. I have also been in battle. Once you can evaluate yourself from the perspective of combat, then the question is what is necessary and sufficient for a given situation.

    On my bike, I carry small; easier to conceal and "hold on to." I'd hate to drop a piece on the street as I blew down the road, for many reasons.

    In my car, the size of the weapon increases according to both the expected locale and the ease of carry.

    There is no pat answer. Additionally, I know my wife can handle the 1911, but what piece will be easiest for her to handle? Upper body strength is an issue for some females as well as males. I have stiffer springs in my .40, 9mm and the .45s. I've watched inexperienced guys who I'd hate to meet in a dark alley have a time pulling back the slides on two of my guns. This will confuse and disorient them in a battle.

    JP
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  5. #19
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    I would say by your avatar that your preference is obvious! I am an "experienced" shooter, well versed in the ways of the wheelie and the bottom feeder alike...and I carry a S&W Model 36 snubby as my CCW.

  6. #20
    New Member Array mloy2's Avatar
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    thanks very much for your responses

    the reason i posted this was because i have narrowed it down to
    S&W 686 4 inch
    colt defender
    S&W 620 4inch
    kimber 3 or 4 inch 1911 (like them all)
    and can't decide

    any info on theese guns would be helpfull

    i have grown up around guns and my dad carries so i have no problems shooting either a revolver or an auto i have however had more experience with an auto but like the more powerfull rounds of the revolver

    thanks again

  7. #21
    Member Array jackdog's Avatar
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    Ok, well I carry both depending on the situation. But I always recommend a revolver for new folks, they are easier to operate lot safer for a new guy. Start with a revolver,
    you can always go to a semi at a later date, once your more experienced.
    What ever your choice, learn the rules of gun safety,and practice same until it's as natural as breathing.
    Jack dog

  8. #22
    Senior Member Array coffeecup's Avatar
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    .45 revolvers are too big/heavy for me to carry in comfort and I'm not going to get caught with anything smaller.

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array Juggernaut's Avatar
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    An instructor of mine said, "If you have to ask, go for the revolver." There are merits and detractors to each, but if you want something you can keep in your pocket and not worry about all that much, a small revolver would probably suit you best. Semi-autos need maintenance to stay reliable, and the 1911 is not really a "noob" gun as some may take a little tuning to run defensive ammo. Try some different models out.
    Vis consili expers mole ruit sua.
    -Horace

  10. #24
    Member Array dawgfvr's Avatar
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    I thought I had something to say...but you know, Juggernaut said it all...and so succinctly!

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    J Frame S&W, I kid you not.

  12. #26
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    J Frame S&W, I kid you not.
    +1. It's what I carry everyday.

  13. #27
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    You can't go wrong with either. I prefer a 4" SA Champion as I can shoot it well, it conceals easily, is rapid to reload and punches a BIG hole through. The revolver is a fine weapon also. I'm particular to S&W's. Sometimes carry a model 36 for ease of taking on and off, a 3" model 66 and a 3" model 29. Try a few of the guns you are interested in at a rental range if available and see what you prefer.
    No matter which you buy and are going to be CC'ing, Practice, Practice and More Practice till that weapons controls are second nature to you. I carry the 1911, 36 and 66 IWB. The 29 is in a shoulder rig.
    Last edited by Sportsterguy; February 10th, 2008 at 05:25 PM. Reason: forgetfullness
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  14. #28
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    Get a revolver and start carrying it. A J-frame is easy to conceal, and comfortable to carry. Then buy a 1911, and take it to the range. Practice a lot, and when you feel comfortable carrying it, your J-frame will be your backup gun. Problem solved!

    Austin

  15. #29
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    Start with a revolver.

    Get a .357 snubbie, then practice with .38 special ... then .38 special +P ... then .357 mag.

    Shoot the hottest you can handle with confidence over multiple shots. All 3 calibers will work, but given equal operator skill, bigger is better.

    ---

    1911's are not good "new-bie" guns due to the (more) complicated controls and methods of operation.


    In addition, there are plenty of non-1911 autoloaders that make excellent carry pieces. They are always worth considering as well, especially the striker-fired and DA/SA types.

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