How do you know how reliable your carry gun is? - Page 2

How do you know how reliable your carry gun is?

This is a discussion on How do you know how reliable your carry gun is? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by Tangle I don't won't this to appear as revolver bashing, it's not, but it is fair to say that a revolver may ...

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  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tangle
    I don't won't this to appear as revolver bashing, it's not, but it is fair to say that a revolver may not be what we have been led to believe it is. I have heard of pocket lint getting between the hammer and frame and preventing the revolver to shoot. The result? The guy was killed.

    I saw an instructor at Gunsite intentionally drop his Glock on the ground. Then he invited anyone else to do the same with theirs (unloaded of course). No body wanted to. I did see a student sling his Beretta 15 feet in front of him, end over end into the dirt, when he missed his grip on a draw. He picked the thing up, blew it off and went on as if it was nothing.

    My instructor, and ex-Border Patrol, even though it was against regulation, used to carry a back up revolver under his jacket because he said he knew that if he went down in a scuffle and his primary revolver went into the dirt/sand, it likely wouldn't fire. He also said revolvers were bad about backing out the ejector rod.

    Another instructor told me of a time he accidently dropped his BUG revolver and it locked up so tight he had to take it home and disassemble it to get it working again.

    I dropped my 686 at the range once trying to do a one-hand reload and the cylinder wouldn't close. Had to take it home and "fix" it.

    Some other maladies I was informed of by my former "revolver man" (the ex BP), was that if any grit got under the ejector star, the gun likely wouldn't function. Another, thing he told me when we were doing a few one hand malfunction drills was that if a case got under the ejector star that he knew of no way to clear the problem with one hand.

    Yet another thing that can happen to a revolver is that dirt, etc. can get in the cylinder and cause loading/unloading/reloading problems. I experienced that one.

    Then, you can bury a Glock in the sea, in the sand, mud, mud puddle, in the snow and ice, even in cow manure and it will still work. I dare say a revolver will not stand up to that. I heard a story of a local LEO that dropped his Glock in a mud puddle and had to fish it out. Guess what? It still functioned.

    Two word rebuttal:

    Good Holster.

    And I'd think if you dropped your gun, regardless of what firing platform it was, you'd likely be in as much trouble if it lands on a pillow or in a pool of hydrochloric acid. Imagine going for the "speed rock" and suddenly your Glock skitters across the floor...

    But seriously this is a good point because I can see why someone might have to worry about this. This is also why I decided I would keep my P89 and use it as my last ditch emergency gun. I'll be among the first to agree that when it comes to "rugged", a well made revolver may not necessarily meet your definition. That Ruger is a brick. It will be firing when my precious Smiths are rusted out shells of their former glory. Of course even that will be centuries after I am dead. Those guns will all outlive me.

    This is also why I decided I was better off carrying one gun of each type. There are certain things one does that the other cannot. Best of both worlds and all that jazz.


  2. #17
    JT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Euclidean
    Imagine going for the "speed rock" and suddenly your Glock skitters across the floor...
    I wouldn't worry about my Glock. What I would worry about is why the heck am I doing a speed rock. (I am agree with Gabe Suarez on the speed rock - don't do it)
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  3. #18
    Member Array uudl's Avatar
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    I don't carry anything I have not personally checked for reliability. After 4 or 5 hundred rounds without a problem or failure, I wil consider carrying that particular firearm. I continue to fire that weapon often with my carry ammo. At the first sign of a problem or failure, I no longer carry that weapon until the problem is fixed.

  4. #19
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Well I was trying to be a little silly so I didn't come off as too serious.

    I must confess I don't relish the idea of a draw that doesn't give me good control over either the vertical or horizontal axis of the weapon's trajectory, plus unless you train it so well it becomes muscle memory, it's a good way to take off a little piece of yourself when you fire. Heck I used the ready stance before I even realized what it was and for better or worse that stance comes to me naturally.

  5. #20
    JT
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    Gabe’s main problem with the speed rock is you are putting yourself in a unstable position, in a extreme close combat situation. When you are back in the “rock”, you are off balance and very vulnerable if your assailant rams into you. He teaches it is better to draw close to the body and fire from the same position as the speed rock, without rocking back.
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  6. #21
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    I shoot it.

    A lot.

    With the ammo I carry in it.

    So far, in nearly 1,500 rounds, not a single bobble.

    Either I'm good to go, or I've shot it too much and I'm going to induce a wear failure.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Array rfurtkamp's Avatar
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    For me, the test is whether it's gone boom for real and for training and for play on demand, regardless of conditions.

    I only own one gun that's met all three, and I don't intend to change.

    I'm at 50k rounds through my various Sigs over the years with only one ammo-related FTF on a dead primer. I don't clean them much. I abuse my carry gun. It should hate me, but it shoots as nice as the three safe queens that back it up.
    Driver carries less than $45 worth of remorse.

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