Shooting the Snubby

Shooting the Snubby

This is a discussion on Shooting the Snubby within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I recently added a S&W J-Frame air weight in 38 special to my arsenal. It is a nice gun and carries easily in a pocket ...

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Thread: Shooting the Snubby

  1. #1
    Member Array HRnTX's Avatar
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    Shooting the Snubby

    I recently added a S&W J-Frame air weight in 38 special to my arsenal. It is a nice gun and carries easily in a pocket holster or ankle rig as a BUG.

    I have spent a good amount of time practicing with my full size S&W M&P and feel comfortable and confident in shooting it. So far, (2 range trips) I have not been able to perform accurate follow up shots. When quickly firing I am finding my 2 and 3 shots are wide, High right or low left not consistently anywhere. I think I may not have a proper grip to control the spunky little kick is this smaller lighter gun. I do have large hands and I have a little trouble getting a comfortable two handed grip.

    I know practice will be key in overcoming this just as it was in learning to shoot fast consistently tight groups with my other gun.

    Your suggestions are appreciated.


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    Make sure you have comfortable grips!!

    Hogue, Pachmayer etc., there are many good ones out there but they gotta fit YOU.
    And dry fire til your fingers bleed!
    CCW permit holder for Idaho, Utah, Pennsylvania, Maine and New Hampshire. I can carry in your country but not my own.

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    Ex Member Array quantum36's Avatar
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    Depending upon your finances, I would suggest purchasing Crimson Trace Laser grips.

    Several months ago I bought a S&W 340 PD .357 mag. It took me over 500 rounds (.38 special) to get proficient.

    Once I installed Laser grips, it was not only more pleasant to shoot but I was more accurate. I could see how the laser beam moved when I pulled the trigger.

    Now, I am just as accurate with the J-frame as I am with a G36 .45 at 7 and 15 yards.

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    Snubs are a different critter for sure, they take awhile to get used to. Go at it slow, make nice and deliberate shots. Worry about "follow up" shots and the speed much later down the road.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    HRnTX, I carried my Taurus Model 85 as a bug on my armor as a BUG and now CCW it sometimes.

    When I teach my pocket pistol course I emphasize the importance of spending most of the time shooting the snubbie with one hand, especially at distances under 10 yards. This is the way I teach it working with pieces of typing paper with 1 inch black dot in the middle of the paper at 7 yards. This is for a right handed shooter, just reverse if you are lefty.

    On cue (visual if you can) step back with your left foot as you draw. As the gun comes out of your holster and the muzzle gets in line with your target the hand will naturally turn inboard as if your were throwing a punch. Accept this and train into it. Work on making it smooth and landing all rounds into the typing paper. As you get good with this you can change the conditions.

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    Distinguished Member Array Gideon's Avatar
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    You may want to consider different grips. I recently purchased pachmyr compaq grips for my J frame so I could shoot more hot +p ammo but I have small hands so I didn't like the reach. However for someone with larger hands it would be ideal as it gives slightly more grip area and it covers the backstrap so it ought to reduce felt recoil. I don't know becasue I never shot mine.

    Not to appear self serving by mine are for sale. You can check them out in the members area of items for sale.

    The other think I found helpful in shooting the J frame is a high grip and to get the first joint of my index on the trigger instead of merely the pad. Helps with more consistent shot placement.

    Dry firing helps and I believe a good trigger job from a good smith would be invaluable.

    I love mine but it's been the hardest weapon of all I have to become proficient with and if I don't practice with it for a while,...well it shows the next time I do shoot it!

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    Fit it with Pachmayr Decelerator grips. They should help.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    Member Array HRnTX's Avatar
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    I know I've got a more trips to the range and much more dry fire practice to do. And perhaps one day I will spring for the laser or some differnt handles to improve/increase my grip. Until then, thank you each for taking the time to offer your suggestions. I appreciate it.

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    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Snubs are a different critter for sure, they take awhile to get used to. Go at it slow, make nice and deliberate shots. Worry about "follow up" shots and the speed much later down the road.
    Good advice. Get in the habit of how you are holding the gun and pulling the trigger until it's 2nd nature. Then , speed up your firing , concentrating on maintaining those.

    Remember, it isn't always how many shots are fired, but how well placed the one's that are....

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    A lesson I learned shooting IPSC.

    First you get good, then you get fast!
    CCW permit holder for Idaho, Utah, Pennsylvania, Maine and New Hampshire. I can carry in your country but not my own.

  11. #11
    Ron
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    I was having a similar problem at first with my 642, my shots usually off to the right. I saw a video about shooting the snub nose and from that video realized that I was not focused on sqeezing the trigger straight back, being very careful to only use the finger and pull stright back, and not move the hand while doing so.

    Also, placing the support hand thumb directly over the strong hand thumb, high up on the grip, helped a lot with controlling recoil.

    I am now very accurate with my 642, at least from distances I am likely to have to use it.
    "It does not do to leave a dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him."

    J. R. R. Tolkien

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    Senior Member Array BeefyBeefo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Snubs are a different critter for sure, they take awhile to get used to. Go at it slow, make nice and deliberate shots. Worry about "follow up" shots and the speed much later down the road.
    I agree with all of that.

    -Jeff-

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    What distance are you at? It's called a belly gun for a reason.

    I recently tried the support thumb over the firing hand as shown here. It works really well.

    Get to know that trigger really well and quick follow up shots will come later in the game.
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

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    Thanks for that link, semerfi.45.

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    Put your target at 10 Yards and concentrate on putting all the bullets in the same hole.

    Speed will come with time. I shoot Revolvers a lot, and practice "headshots" at 25 Yards with my J-Frame, but it is never a shot I would take IRL. I do that just to practice my accuracy.

    "Smooth is fast and fast is smooth."

    Slow down and concentrate on the fundamentals.
    Also, Dry Fire at least ten minutes per day with that gun. It will accustom you to the Double Action Revolver trigger and build up your trigger finger muscles, as well as help to smooth the gun's functioning. That's all a "trigger job" is, but instead of dry firing the smoothing is done with a stone and emory cloth.

    Biker

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