Couple Of 1911 Safe Carrying Questions

Couple Of 1911 Safe Carrying Questions

This is a discussion on Couple Of 1911 Safe Carrying Questions within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hey all, As I bragged about in a recent post, I recently became the owner of a beautiful Kimber Tactical Pro II. I intend to ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array Griblik's Avatar
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    Couple Of 1911 Safe Carrying Questions

    Hey all,


    As I bragged about in a recent post, I recently became the owner of a beautiful Kimber Tactical Pro II. I intend to make this my EDC piece once I put in enough time practicing with it to feel comfortable running the platform on instinct. It will be carried in an UBG Canute which should be arriving soon. In my range time with it, a couple of thoughts have occurred to me that I wanted to run past y'all.


    First, my TPII is equipped with an ambidextrous safety. As I'm right handed, it seems as though this serves little purpose for me. Is there any disadvantage? Seems like that potentially increased the possibility of it being swiped off by rubbing up against something? My understanding is that it's not terribly difficult or expensive to swap for a standard lever, but not cheap and easy either, so I'd just as soon skip it if it's not neccesary, but will certainly tackle it if it's a legitimate safety concern. Anybody have any thoughts?


    Secondly, while slightly on the late side to do anything about it since UBG started construction on my holster on Sunday, what does everybody think about the need for a thumb-break holster for cocked and locked carry? Seems like it would provide one additional level of safety, (should, say, my ambidextrous safety be swiped off accidently), but at the same time it's one more thing to slow down an emergency draw and one more thing to think about in addition to swiping off my safety. Again, what does everybody say..?


    On a side note, mini-mini range report, I ran 200 FMJ loads through it on Sunday, had not a single FTF/FTE/FT-anything else, and shot the first mag out of it better then my 500th mag out of my Glock 19. I never claimed to be a crack shot, but I'm think the grip angle or something about the 1911 platform lends itself to my shooting style, because I shot better with it then I have with anything else, ever. Not a terribly scientific test, but I was chasing a 20 ounce pop bottle across the yard at maybe 10 yards with a probably 80% hit rate, and it made my day. :-) Struggled with tearing it down and cleaning it that evening, (one aspect I do miss of my Glock - simplicity!), but managed to break it open, scrub it down, and reassemble, and can't wait to go run a few hundred more rounds through and start carrying this beast!!


    Thanks for everybody's input and support...!
    .40 is fine.


  2. #2
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    Well, for myself an ambi-safety doesn't seem to big or an issue. I'd probably keep in on. You are going with a darn good holster, so even if it does get accidentally disengaged, nothing should contact the trigger (plus there is more than one safety on your 1911).

    As for a thumb break, why add an extra step to the presentation process? UBG's stuff has pretty good retention for leather, and the odds off all of the weapon's safeties malfunctioning and discharging a round are extremely low I would think.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
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  3. #3
    Member Array Griblik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyeLCPL View Post
    Well, for myself an ambi-safety doesn't seem to big or an issue. I'd probably keep in on. You are going with a darn good holster, so even if it does get accidentally disengaged, nothing should contact the trigger (plus there is more than one safety on your 1911).

    As for a thumb break, why add an extra step to the presentation process? UBG's stuff has pretty good retention for leather, and the odds off all of the weapon's safeties malfunctioning and discharging a round are extremely low I would think.
    Those were the conclusions I was leaning towards (and hope everyone else leans towards as well!!) :-) Just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing a thought process or two.

    You've used UBG's stuff? Never seen one in person, but wanted to get away from Kydex and into leather for this one, but didn't wanna wait 10 years for a VM2 or anything, read lots of good stuff about UBG but never seen one in person.....
    .40 is fine.

  4. #4
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    I carry my 1911 in a UBG Canute, and for the price and wait time, you can't beat it, great stuff. I also got a matching belt and mag holder from him, it's all top notch.

    I'm sure some other people will chime in with their own views on your questions, but that is my thought process on it. It is like 3 in the mornin or somethin back in the states right now.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  5. #5
    Member Array Griblik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyeLCPL View Post
    It is like 3 in the mornin or somethin back in the states right now.
    Haha, yes it surely is. What the heck am I doing on here this late, anyway?? Thanks for the input and the info. Stay safe over there brother.
    .40 is fine.

  6. #6
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    Well, the ambi safety allows weak hand only operation of the safety. You ARE practicing weak hand shooting just in case right? You can do it with a normal safety but if it's there why change it until you've run it for a while.

    No thumb breaks on my holsters. Also, holsters are a very individual thing. What works for one may not work for another. That's why many of us have collections...
    If you stand up and be counted, from time to time you may get yourself knocked down. But remember this: A man flattened by an opponent can get up again. A man flattened by conformity stays down for good. ~ Thomas J. Watson, Jr.

  7. #7
    ADK
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    I haven't read your previous post, so forgive me for coming to the party late.

    Personally I prefer a strong-side safety only for all of my 1911s (and my Browning Hi Power). Some people complain that with an ambi-safety there is a tendency to accidentally disengage the thumb safety by the knuckle of the shooting hand. If it is not bothering you, and this is not occurring, I concur with others and recommend you keep it.

    I absolutely recommend against a thumb break for the holster, unless you are required by some sort of regulation. Some manufacturers put the thumb break in a place that may allow the thumb safety to be flicked off as you "break" the snap, putting your pistol into ready to fire mode as you are drawing it from the holster and potentially setting up an AD/ND situation.

    I'm not familiar with UBG holsters, but thumb-breaks straps and 1911s are generally accepted as not being a good combination. If you're concerned about carrying cocked and locked, I recommend you try carrying the pistol around (unloaded) for a day or two. You'll find the thumb safety will not mysteriously disengage; 1911 style pistols were designed to be carried cocked and locked.

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    Senior Member Array ICTsnub's Avatar
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    I'm left handed, buy my Canutes have body shields with the safety boned in the "on safe" position.
    I'm not a lawyer or a LEO, just a pantload with a computer.

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    I prefer a non-ambi safety, but as has been said, there's really no harm and it does allow for better weak hand operability.

    I don't believe that thumb break holsters are necessary, or even appropriate for self defense carry, especially for a gun with the safety redundancies of a modern 1911.

    My .02.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."

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  10. #10
    Ron
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    In my opinion, it is enough to worry about not forgetting to flick off the thumb safety, without having another step like a thumb break to worry about. The safety will not come off by itself, nor will the hammer drop without both the thumb and grip safety disengaged.
    "It does not do to leave a dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him."

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  11. #11
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    True the safety "will not come off by itself" but it will with some help when you don't want it to. I had it happen a number of times before I bobbed the left lever down (I'm left handed so I need the right lever) to around original GI specs. Now let me tell you all before you start with the defective safety stuff. This was a new gun with a perfectly functioning safety. The problem is that in my every day job I spend a lot of it squeezing in and out of very confined spaces and do contortions for a lot of the tasks I perform. I also get in and out of my truck many times a day. All it takes is one good push against any hard surface to disengage that safety. Personally I never really felt so uncomfortable that I would not carry my 1911, but I did alter my 1911's to eliminate it happening just for the extra safety that it's designed to be.
    "Those who would give up essential liberties for a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty or safety" -Benjamin Franklin-
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    Distinguished Member Array SonofASniper's Avatar
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    A thumbreak is a just another layer of retention to keep your gun from leaving your holster without your permision. It should not be intended as a safety against discharge for your gun.

    Contrary to popular belief , it will not slow you down as long as you give drawing your weapon some simple training time. Probably about the same amount that your going to put in anyways just because your excited to have a new holster and your checking to make sure that it is going to meet all your expectations.

    For what its worth, all my IWB holsters do not have a thumbreak because I feel comfortable enough with their retention level. My OWB do have a thumbreak because they don't have enough retention ability on their own.

    Since you have been a Glock owner, your bigger concern in training with a 1911 is going to be remembering to disengage the safety when you draw understress. Just going to be a muscle memory issue.
    I will support gun control when you can guarantee all guns are removed from this planet. That includes military and law enforcement. When you can accomplish that, then I will be the last person to lay down my gun. Then I will carry the weapon that replaces the gun.

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    Senior Member Array SCfromNY's Avatar
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    I had 1 thumbreak holster when I first got my CWP. It quickly went to the "holster" box. The only thumbreak I currently have is for an occasionally used shoulder holster.
    Registration: A prelude to Confiscation and Anarchy.

  14. #14
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    If you are right handed and carry strongside between 3-4 O'clock, this means you must draw with your right hand. I cant reach my weapon @ 3 o'clock with my weak hand (left) and successfully draw it from my holster. If I draw my 1911 with my right hand, as soon as it clears the holster, the safety comes off as it approaches target (muscle memory). In this case, the ambi safety does me no good. If I need to shoot weak handed, the safety is already off.

    Personally, I dont like ambi safeties. I have had my CDP's re-worked to remove the ambi safety. I dont like knowing that it could possibly be knocked off by brushing against a door jamb or any other obstacle. I think its a personal preference.
    "Government is not the solution to our problem; government IS the problem". - Ronald Reagan 1981

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    Distinguished Member Array T Bone's Avatar
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    Thumb breaks are generally considered a bad idea on a CC rig. You don't need it, or want it.

    As to the safety getting switched off, yeah it happens occasionally. With the weapon holstered, trigger guard covered, nothing to worry about there. Simply click the safety back to "safe". All my 1911's have ambi's (I'm left handed). I certainly have no desire to alter them to be only properly operated with one hand.

    What you are really expressing though, is anxiety over cocked and locked carry. Familiarity and experience with the weapon will alleviate that in time. Frankly a big cause of this for many people is the hammer being visible. If it were hidden inside the frame (like say on many rifles/shotguns) folks would be far less intimidated by it.

    Have a look around The Site to educate yourself a bit more on the 1911 platform. Cocked and locked (condition one) carry is discussed in at least one article there. A TON of great 1911 information. Go to the "Library" section. Click on Technical. Also in Library, have a look through CCW. One of the best 1911 sites on the Web IMO.
    Regards, T Bone.


    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety". Benjamin Franklin

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