Advice for new 442 heavy trigger?

Advice for new 442 heavy trigger?

This is a discussion on Advice for new 442 heavy trigger? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've searched a bit, but really haven't seen a consensus... I've traditionally been a semi shooter, but recently traded for a brand new Smith and ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: Advice for new 442 heavy trigger?

  1. #1
    cj [OP]
    cj is offline
    Senior Member Array cj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,008

    Advice for new 442 heavy trigger?

    I've searched a bit, but really haven't seen a consensus...

    I've traditionally been a semi shooter, but recently traded for a brand new Smith and Wesson 442. It looks great, but the trigger is AWFUL! I have a Kel-Tec P11 and would say that its trigger (traditionally cited as the greatest shortcoming in the P11) is better.

    Using a scale, the trigger is breaking at about 14 pounds on the new 442...a real problem since I was hoping to use this pistol as a training tool for my wife.

    So...what is the current advice and approach? I've seen a lot of 'dry fire it 500 times to smooth it out', but will that really have this much of an impact on a 14-pound trigger pull? It already seems smooth enough, just really...heavy.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array mr surveyor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Texas, South of the Sabine
    Posts
    1,149
    dryfire, dryfire, dryfire.... change hands.... dryfire, dryfire, dryfire


    worked wonders on my 637


    then, there are spring kits that will help as well as professional trigger work. You should be able to get that trigger in the 6-7 pound range easily.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array Jackle1886's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kendall, MI
    Posts
    941
    Pretty much you have a few options. Dryfire it, take it to a smith for a trigger job to smooth it out, or have a smith put different springs in it to lighten the pull.
    Better to die on your feet, than to live on your knees.

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Array RETSUPT99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    45,525
    I'd still go the dry fire route...it does smooth things out.
    I would assume that you want it smooth, not light. OMO
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

    ***********************************
    Certified Glock Armorer
    NRA Life Member[/B]

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Array Gideon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,789
    If you have the money and time; I'd encourage a full action job. If you don't have the money, dry fire until you can't stand it but frankly that takes a long time and really only does make is smoother as compared to smoother and lighter.

  6. #6
    cj [OP]
    cj is offline
    Senior Member Array cj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,008
    Quote Originally Posted by retsupt99 View Post
    I'd still go the dry fire route...it does smooth things out.
    I would assume that you want it smooth, not light. OMO
    Smooth yes, not light, but lightER than its current 14 pounds for certain. I have trouble holding a steady sight picture with my off hand between the small grip and 14 pound pull...I can't imagine my wife trying to handle it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gideon View Post
    If you have the money and time; I'd encourage a full action job.
    Is that through the S&W performance center, or just a fairly standard option at a gunsmith? As much hunting and shooting as is in my little town, there doesn't seem to be a gunsmith for quite a distance from here.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    5,319
    There are many professionals smiths out there who will do a wonderful job tuning that up....had a buddy who sent his stuff here. Actions By T - Teddy Jacobson Pistolsmith

    But Smith and Wesson will also do it for you I think they call it it "super-tuning".
    Friends don't let friends be MALL NINJAS.


    I am just as nice as anyone lets me be and can be just as mean as anyone makes me. - Quoted from Terryger, New member to our forum.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array jca1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    543
    If you want it really smooth and lighter get a smith to do a trigger job on it. I have trigger jobs done on all my revolvers.

  9. #9
    VIP Member Array JimmyC4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Minnesnowta
    Posts
    2,034
    On both J-frames I have, I immediately had the local gunsmith put in a spring kit that lightened things up. At the same time he did a small amount of work to further smooth out the pull.

    They remained safe, and it cost me about $45 per gun for the work.
    "It's a big gun when I carry it, it is also a big gun when I take it out” – Clint Smith

  10. #10
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,924
    If you can't afford an action job right now then you can buy the Reduced Power spring pack from Wolff.
    You can move down to the 8# hammer spring and usually the 13# rebound spring without affecting primer strike reliability.


    SHOOTER'S PAK - Reduced Power
    This pak contains 1 each 8 pound reduced power hammer spring and 1 each 13, 14 and 15 pound reduced power rebound springs allowing adjustment for lighter and smoother trigger and hammer action. Note: Models 317, 650, 651 have a 12 Lb. factory hammer spring.
    Stock No. 17125.....$ 9.00 ea

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array harley2007's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    USA!
    Posts
    1,046
    Quote Originally Posted by mr surveyor View Post
    dryfire, dryfire, dryfire.... change hands.... dryfire, dryfire, dryfire


    worked wonders on my 637


    then, there are spring kits that will help as well as professional trigger work. You should be able to get that trigger in the 6-7 pound range easily.
    I concur...our 642 (I say ours, but it is hers!).......after lots of dry fireing....smoothes out.
    "I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy!" - Dorothy Parker

  12. #12
    VIP Member
    Array ctr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
    Posts
    2,577
    Dry fire as others have said. After 500 - 1000 pulls, that trigger will really start to smooth out nicely. Also, don't oil the trigger, inside the hammer, or other internal mechanisms related to the trigger. Just let it wear naturally.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array cagueits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Puerto Rico
    Posts
    911
    Good luck with the dryfire & springs. I went both routes on a S&W340PD I had and finally I got rid of it. Look into the S&W438 Bodyguard. It has a shrouded hammer that lets you do some precise fire on the single action mode (light pull... @3-4lbs), while conserving the double action mode for close in/fire from a jacket pocket work (heavy pull... @12lbs). I just wish one could swing the cylinder out when lowering the hammer.
    I can no longer keep track of threads as I used to. If you need to contact me, PM me instead of asking me something in the thread. Disclaimer - No legal advice issued anywhere. Take care.

  14. #14
    Member Array LouisianaMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    393
    +1 on Wolff spring kit. I put one into my J-frame and also into 2 Ruger SP-101s. About $10, an hour's time, and achievable if you're generally handy. In my case, dry-firing led only to a blistered finger & no noticeable trigger improvement. (My gun is an older piece with grooved trigger--I subsequently pulled it out & polished off the grooves!)

    I downloaded an on-line copy of a S&W Model 10 tech manual to help you figure out what fits where; it's not exactly the same as your J frame, but close enough that you can use it for accurate reference. On the S&W, I left the stock mainspring in place to ensure adequate ignition, and I changed out the harder-to-reach trigger return spring in order to achieve a decent trigger pull. It works fine & made all the difference in the world.

    Disassemble small springs inside a Baggie to avoid loss (or injury). If you don't have good, small screwdrivers, you may want to buy a gunsmithing screwdriver set when you order the spring kit. I also used my jeweler's screwdriver kit. I'm handy, but no engineer. With careful double-checking the manual as I went, I replaced the trigger return spring in less than an hour's work. My daughter couldn't even pull the trigger at first; now she can shoot it fine.

    Final note. If your wife is new at this, don't have her shoot +P ammo from a snubbie until/unless she masters standard ammo. I almost ruined shooting for my wife (and especially my daughters) by messing that up.

    Happy shooting!

  15. #15
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,924
    The rebound spring is usually heavier and stiffer than it needs to be.
    It really makes the trigger pull hard and stiff.
    In addition every little bit of roughness adds a grit feeling to the trigger pull.

    If you carefully polish the inside of the rebound spring housing - AKA the hole that is drilled to house the spring and buff the outside of the lighter weight replacement Wolff spring & carefully stone the contact surfaces that slide back and forth on that little upright post you can greatly improve your trigger. Any roughness that catches on that post when the rebound slide moves to the rear will feel like grit in your trigger pull.
    Better yet you can use some spray adhesive to mount a sheet of 1000 grit 3M Silicon Carbide paper to a perfectly flat piece of plate glass and lightly buff the bottom face and the bottom side of that rebound slide (that rubs inside the frame) by laying the part flat on the 1000 grit paper and sliding it back and forth a few times just to smooth it up. You do not need to polish it perfectly bright. Just smooth up any machine marks and buff it a little.
    Doing all of that will greatly improve your trigger pull.

    OK - not exactly the same S&W internals but, we're only interested in the rebound slide and spring here.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. from fitted firm trigger cover vs. soft vs. no specific trigger cover
    By jimtem in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: December 27th, 2009, 11:38 PM
  2. 'Need some "heavy gun" carry advice.
    By chemicalpoet in forum Open Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: August 22nd, 2009, 05:47 PM
  3. Heavy DA trigger pull on daughter's PPK/S
    By 1911packer in forum Defensive Carry Guns
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: November 27th, 2008, 07:34 PM
  4. The best advice for your trigger finger...
    By BenGoodLuck in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: February 23rd, 2008, 01:49 AM
  5. Heavy trigger pull during slumber
    By Maklioso in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: December 14th, 2007, 11:01 PM

Search tags for this page

442 trigger job

,

442 trigger weight

,

642 trigger job columbus ohio

,

lighten s&w 442 trigger

,
s&w mod 442 mainspring adjustment
,
s&w model 442 trigger pull
,

smith 442 heavy trigger pull

,

smith and wesson 442 lighten trigger

,

smith and wesson 442 trigger job

,
smith and wesson 442 trigger pull
,

smith and wesson model 442 trigger pull

,

youtube s&w trigger jobs 442

Click on a term to search for related topics.