Too weak to pull DA trigger?

This is a discussion on Too weak to pull DA trigger? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by Majorlk Be advised that gauge only goes to 72 ounces - 4.5 pounds. Most DA trigger pulls, both pistol and revolver, are ...

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Thread: Too weak to pull DA trigger?

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array C Bennett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Majorlk View Post
    Be advised that gauge only goes to 72 ounces - 4.5 pounds. Most DA trigger pulls, both pistol and revolver, are higher than that unless they've had some serious trigger work done on them.

    If you're going to spend the money on a trigger pull gauge, do it right the first time and get the Lyman Digital. The mechanical gauges are seldom accurate to anything better than a half-pound, no matter what the advertising says.
    didnt even look, just googled for cheap trigger pull scale lol. that one was a good price the others were $50 and over which is IMO outrageous and the reason I dont have one :) . $50 or more is not(to me) worth even a 1X purchase..I mean I know if a trigger is either good or sucks..I dont need to know how many pounds it is to know it sucks :) it just sucks :) . and i know for me anything resembling a good pull is normally 5-7 pounds or LESS.

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  3. #17
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    Can I ask why you want to get her a revolver in the first place?

    There's this common idea that revolvers are better for women since they are less complex and that somehow makes them better for women. If your women has the IQ of a brick, maybe, but other than that, there are no benefits:

    1) Most revolvers have relatively heavy DA-only trigger pulls. While some think this is great for a self-defense gun because it reduces the chances of an accidental discharge, what it does for women is force them to use a good portion of their finger strength and sends accuracy into the gutter. When we all know that trigger control is one of the most important aspects of accuracy - why do we think that giving a woman the worst triggers possible is a good idea?

    2) Revolvers have significantly more felt-recoil than semi-autos. Not much to say about this, but given a semi-auto and a revolver of the same weight firing the same cartridge, the semi-auto will kick a lot less. This will help keep your woman's technique in check (less flinching) and allow her to run a more powerful cartridge than she'd be able to run in a revolver.

    3) Capacity - this doesn't need much explaining.

    4) Weight - the point is that for the gun to be effective she needs to carry it. A 5 pound J-frame isn't going to be in the purse all that often, a Kahr or mini-Glock would be. If you're thinking about those titanium air-weight revolvers in .38 and .357mag - the .38 kicks harder than a hot .40 in a small Glock, and the .357 kicks like a .460 in a 1911 ... neither are girl-friendly.

    5) Revolvers aren't very purse-friendly. Chances are, if you can get your girl to carry at all, she's going to carry in her purse. She's not going to want to stick a holster on the gun while its in the purse because of the precious cargo-room it eats up. With an auto she at least has the ability to leave the gun in there without a round in the chamber, with a revolver she needs to run a holster - she has no choice in that matter.

    My recommendation is that you look at an officer's-sized 1911 chambered in 9mm - and possibly with an aluminum frame for the weight savings. The recoil springs on 9mm 1911s are light enough that she should be able to rack the slide easily, and the short 4lb pull should be easy for her to handle - and handle accurately. The round is powerful enough to be effective but not enough to scare her away from pulling the trigger.

    That's my $0.02.
    Billy
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  4. #18
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    I think before the op does anything further, he needs to ascertain what is going wrong. Either something is wrong with the gun; something is not right with the lady's ability to pull the trigger--perhaps a health issue; or the statement that she is tougher and stronger than most is inaccurate.

    You can't solve a problem until you know what is actually wrong.

    Taking the tougher and stronger than most statement at face value I would have the gun evaluated. I would also look at how it fits her hand to make sure it is neither too large nor too small for her grip. Then, per Janq, go to a rental range and a variety of gun stores and let her pick what works for her-- maybe let her get some professional firearms training before she picks something out.

  5. #19
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    Some revolvers just have a trigger pull that is obnoxiously heavy from the factory.
    Usually the factory supplied springs are heavier than they need to be to insure reliable ignition.

    Start her out with one of these.
    Search Ebay for Gripmaster Light
    They are just great.

    Also Go Here - Wolf Gunsprings Reduced Power for Charter Arms
    http://www.gunsprings.com/index.cfm?...s&cID=3&mID=72


  6. #20
    Member Array TWeatherford's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the suggestions, I think Hopyard is spot on. I need to make sure the gun is ok, and she needs to find out whats up with her finger strength. Maybe the gun is just far too large for her hands, so its harder to pull the trigger.

    I don't mean to brag or be macho, but I do have fairly high forearm and grip strength. When I work out with buddies I can pretty much always do more reps with higher weight than any of them can, and most work out a lot more than I do. I think this trigger is pretty nice.
    Be Prepared

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    Can I ask why you want to get her a revolver in the first place?

    There's this common idea that revolvers are better for women since they are less complex and that somehow makes them better for women. If your women has the IQ of a brick, maybe, but other than that, there are no benefits:

    1) Most revolvers have relatively heavy DA-only trigger pulls. While some think this is great for a self-defense gun because it reduces the chances of an accidental discharge, what it does for women is force them to use a good portion of their finger strength and sends accuracy into the gutter. When we all know that trigger control is one of the most important aspects of accuracy - why do we think that giving a woman the worst triggers possible is a good idea?

    2) Revolvers have significantly more felt-recoil than semi-autos. Not much to say about this, but given a semi-auto and a revolver of the same weight firing the same cartridge, the semi-auto will kick a lot less. This will help keep your woman's technique in check (less flinching) and allow her to run a more powerful cartridge than she'd be able to run in a revolver.

    3) Capacity - this doesn't need much explaining.

    4) Weight - the point is that for the gun to be effective she needs to carry it. A 5 pound J-frame isn't going to be in the purse all that often, a Kahr or mini-Glock would be. If you're thinking about those titanium air-weight revolvers in .38 and .357mag - the .38 kicks harder than a hot .40 in a small Glock, and the .357 kicks like a .460 in a 1911 ... neither are girl-friendly.

    5) Revolvers aren't very purse-friendly. Chances are, if you can get your girl to carry at all, she's going to carry in her purse. She's not going to want to stick a holster on the gun while its in the purse because of the precious cargo-room it eats up. With an auto she at least has the ability to leave the gun in there without a round in the chamber, with a revolver she needs to run a holster - she has no choice in that matter.

    My recommendation is that you look at an officer's-sized 1911 chambered in 9mm - and possibly with an aluminum frame for the weight savings. The recoil springs on 9mm 1911s are light enough that she should be able to rack the slide easily, and the short 4lb pull should be easy for her to handle - and handle accurately. The round is powerful enough to be effective but not enough to scare her away from pulling the trigger.

    That's my $0.02.
    5 pounds???
    WOW!
    Disclaimer: The posts made by this member are only the members opinion, not a reflection on anyone else, nor the group, and should not be cause for anyone to get their undergarments wedged in an uncomfortable position.

  8. #22
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    Hand strength. They have these dealies for trumpet players that's supposed to strengthen the fingers individually. I forget the name, but my local music store has them. They are great for this kind of thing.

    Also, rubber bands work great for resistance and building up strength in the fingers.

    And if it's a hand strength issue, they have dealies for that too. :)
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  9. #23
    Senior Member Array C Bennett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Ng View Post
    Can I ask why you want to get her a revolver in the first place?

    There's this common idea that revolvers are better for women since they are less complex and that somehow makes them better for women. If your women has the IQ of a brick, maybe, but other than that, there are no benefits:

    1) Most revolvers have relatively heavy DA-only trigger pulls. While some think this is great for a self-defense gun because it reduces the chances of an accidental discharge, what it does for women is force them to use a good portion of their finger strength and sends accuracy into the gutter. When we all know that trigger control is one of the most important aspects of accuracy - why do we think that giving a woman the worst triggers possible is a good idea?

    2) Revolvers have significantly more felt-recoil than semi-autos. Not much to say about this, but given a semi-auto and a revolver of the same weight firing the same cartridge, the semi-auto will kick a lot less. This will help keep your woman's technique in check (less flinching) and allow her to run a more powerful cartridge than she'd be able to run in a revolver.

    3) Capacity - this doesn't need much explaining.

    4) Weight - the point is that for the gun to be effective she needs to carry it. A 5 pound J-frame isn't going to be in the purse all that often, a Kahr or mini-Glock would be. If you're thinking about those titanium air-weight revolvers in .38 and .357mag - the .38 kicks harder than a hot .40 in a small Glock, and the .357 kicks like a .460 in a 1911 ... neither are girl-friendly.

    5) Revolvers aren't very purse-friendly. Chances are, if you can get your girl to carry at all, she's going to carry in her purse. She's not going to want to stick a holster on the gun while its in the purse because of the precious cargo-room it eats up. With an auto she at least has the ability to leave the gun in there without a round in the chamber, with a revolver she needs to run a holster - she has no choice in that matter.

    My recommendation is that you look at an officer's-sized 1911 chambered in 9mm - and possibly with an aluminum frame for the weight savings. The recoil springs on 9mm 1911s are light enough that she should be able to rack the slide easily, and the short 4lb pull should be easy for her to handle - and handle accurately. The round is powerful enough to be effective but not enough to scare her away from pulling the trigger.

    That's my $0.02.
    Because people that dont REGULARLY TRAIN with their weapon meaning a few times a month every 2-3 weeks at a minimum at the range SHOULD NOT IMO CARRY SEMI AUTOS..why because if something happens in the heat of the moment and they have a malfunction a limp wrist,stove pipe, the round is a dud and it just goes click...they are most likely to freeze up and not know how to fix or clear the malfunction...

    best test for this is buy some snap caps sneak them in her(or his) magazine at various intervals(never first though just not a good time) then watch and see what happens when it just goes click...if they have no idea whats wrong, why it happened, or how to clear it and just look or stand there dumbfounded they need not have a semi auto....now drill a lot and they WILL know what to do and how to clear that but you HAVE to test them on it! Ive seen cops on the firing range get a jam and have no idea what to do they just stand there....

    Thats why I recommend a Revolver to people that dont regularly train with a pistol...you cant stove pipe or ,limp wrist a revolver...if you have a FTF you just pull the trigger to get to the next round...no fancy clearing drills needed..its just a more simple weapon. Id NEVER let my wife regularly carry a semi auto...why she does not like to shoot or practice..she MAY get dragged out to the range 1-2 times a YEAR and put a total of possibly 25-30 rounds down range..she can pull the trigger aim rather well(for the limited practice) and hit the vitals on a target..but if she limp wristed my Glock 23 she would not have the first idea whats wrong with it nor how to fix it.

  10. #24
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    See if she has the finger strenght to dry fire the gun. Might look at some different grips to change the position of her finger on the trigger. A spring change will give a lighter trigger pull, but is not usually my first choice. If she doesnt have the finger strength for DA trigger I would guess she would have problem racking slide.
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  11. #25
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    IMHO
    I am thinking that HER hand size, in direct correlation to that (size) of the grip, may be too small to effectively hold the pistol, and have enough strength in her hand to pull the trigger because of overextension. JMHO


    Try getting her a firearm that has a grip that fits in her hand, ie; small hands, small grips,


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  12. #26
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    I'm amazed at all the replies from people who are dumbfounded that she can't pull the trigger.

    Let me tell you my experience letting female members of my family shoot my Smith and Wesson 640 and 686:

    My sister who is 5'2 130lbs fixes plumbing and does carpentry work on her house. When I say that, I don't mean she hands tools to her husband, I mean SHE does it. He wouldn't know which end of a screw driver to use. She has problems pulling the trigger of both of my revolvers in DA. She can do it, but not well enough to shoot the gun competently.

    My sister-in-law who is 5'4" 130lbs can barely squeeze the trigger enough to dry fire the gun one time. She has 5 kids and I don't have to tell most about how physical it is running after them.

    My cousin who is 5'7" 120lbs and is 24yrs. She's climbed Mt Fuji at night and was a very good water polo player in High School. She simply can't squeeze the trigger in DA.

    None of the females I have let shoot my guns, shoot them in DA. They simply don't have the finger strength. They like shooting my 686 in SA, but my cousin has some trouble safely cocking the hammer.

    To sum up; I don't believe your soon-to-be wife is out of the ordinary. I certainly don't think there's anything wrong with her.
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  13. #27
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    Find a used Colt revolver and her problem may well be solved.
    I've read some other recommendations, and I do believe a revolver is the best place to start when you're new to handguns.
    Regards,
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  14. #28
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    How about this idea? If she can pull the trigger on the Charter revolver, get her something she can shoot, and let her choose her gun.
    I have 5 handguns of my own, and I have chosen every one of them.
    My S&W Model 29 was the only one I bought without renting one and trying it first.
    The Kimber Pro Crimson Carry II, the S&W Model 36, the S&W 686+, and the Ruger MK III I had fired before buying.
    Every gun I buy must fit me, my hands, strength,and I just flat plain have to like shooting it.If she doesn't like the gun, she won't want to carry it, she won't want to train with it, the point is, the gun is hers and her choice.
    Take her to the range and let her try several guns, whatever SHE thinks she might like and let HER make the final decision.
    If she likes revolvers, fine, if she prefers a semi-auto that's great too.
    I have small but very strong hands(too many years of turning wrenches) and the DA trigger on every one of mine is fine with me. The only one I shoot better in SA is the Model 36.
    If she likes a revolver better, work on some exercises to build up her hand strength, but make sure the frame fits her hand. If the frame is too large for her, she will have a long reach for the trigger, and if her hands are weak, that will compound the trigger problem. If the trigger reach is not right she will have problems with accuracy as well, too much or not enough finger on the trigger will pull/push the shot right/left.
    The bottom line is it's her gun, it's her choice, period.
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  15. #29
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    Sounds like someone needs to eat her Wheaties. ;- )
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  16. #30
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    If the gun is too big for her hands then the gun is unsuitable for her. Even worse if she has problems pulling the trigger. If she is so weak in her hands that she is unable to pull the trigger in DA she could get a SA pistol and carry it cocked and locked, which means a lighter trigger. However, she has to feel comfortable carrying chambered (I am not sure that being so weak in her hands she would be able to rack the slide in a stress-inducing situation). Go to the range and rent a couple of pistols and revolvers let her try them. Only she can tell which firearm is good for her or not. In any chase, it is easier to change the gun than trying to change her. Just my two cents.
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