Please Tell Me What You Think About This!

This is a discussion on Please Tell Me What You Think About This! within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; There's a lot to be said about starting out with a decent revolver in .38 or .357. For one thing, loading only six rounds at ...

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Thread: Please Tell Me What You Think About This!

  1. #16
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    Array gasmitty's Avatar
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    There's a lot to be said about starting out with a decent revolver in .38 or .357.

    For one thing, loading only six rounds at a time forces the shooter to SLOW DOWN. Lord-a-mighty, I dearly love to blast away and empty the magazine as fast as I can sometimes, but unless I'm doing a specific drill, that just burns up pricey ammo and does nothing for my skills.

    Another thing is that there is nothing quite like a broken-in DA trigger on a K-frame to teach you good trigger control. I started out with a 1911 20+ years ago, but I still bring the M64 along often to remind me to smooth out my trigger pull. If you can master keeping sights aligned on the target through the revolver's DA trigger pull, you'll be an ace with most semi-autos.

    .38 ammo isn't as plentiful as it was 20 years ago, but practice ammo is still typically cheaper than most other defensive rounds.

    Lastly, the revolver has a simpler "manual of arms" and there's no safety to manipulate when adrenaline is pumping. Reloading is slower for sure, but that's what second guns are for!
    Smitty
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  3. #17
    Ex Member Array Cold Warrior's Avatar
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    If you don't know or can't find a gun buddy, take a CCW class, or maybe go to a local range to get advice and help. Fellow and female shooters will be glad to talk and to shoot with you...especially if you are buying the ammo. Note: Ask them, or us, before buying a gun. Also buy and read gun magazines and scan the net [which you have obviously done] to get what you can get, including "YOU TUBE" gun instructions and gun reviews. THEN, take an unloaded empty gun to a range, including the magazines.

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uncballzer View Post
    That's why my latest purchase was the S&W M&P 340 instead of the 642, and I'm loving it!
    Cool. I've got two S&W 38s (old 49 and a 442). At least ONE of them should have been a 357 snub. What was I thinking?
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  5. #19
    Senior Member Array HK Dan's Avatar
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    Browning Buckmark/Ruger Mk III?
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  6. #20
    VIP Member Array Pikachu711's Avatar
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    Beginner/Novice Handgun

    Quote Originally Posted by GM View Post
    If it has to be a handgun I was thinking too about a 38 with 4” barrel. Like you say a snubbie may have too much recoil. I think that a 38 +p should also be too much for that kind of person. And if their confidence level should go up in the future, they can get other gun then. Rather buying other gun in the future than having a gun they are afraid of shooting or that they shot themselves in the foot.
    I was thinking that precise option as well. A few years ago I brought my younger brother (now 43 years old) to a local range with me. He was curious if he could handle firing a handgun. At the time I had a .45 & a .38 with a 4 inch barrel.

    He loved firing both my .45 & the .38. He had a problem with the recoil of the .45. He did much better with my S&W .38 Model 10 w/4 inch barrel. He did fairly well and found it very comfortable to handle & fire. He did a fairly good job hitting the target as well. He still has the targets from that day as a reminder of the fun he had at the range.

    Now if you're curious, he opted NOT to buy a handgun for himself. He decided that having a handgun in his home was not right for him. For the time being he has a "Louisville Slugger" by his apartment door "in case of an emergency." I keep hoping that he will change his mind & ask me to go with him to a gun store to select his first handgun.

    One day I hope that he decides to buy a handgun for his home protection. I'd be thrilled to go with him to buy his first handgun.
    "Gun control is being able to hit your target."
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  7. #21
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GM View Post
    A question often asked in other forums and also in DC is, [B][I]what kind of gun a person without previous gun experience should buy
    Are you missing something, when not quite knowing what to recommend to a person you know little about? Sure: knowledge of that person's background, capabilities and limitations to a degree that exceeds that person's own knowledge. IMO, that's the big difference, when posed a question from someone you don't know.

    Every person is different.

    What we all miss, when a question from an anonymous person is posed, is knowledge about that person's issues, preferences, ability to manage recoil, actual skill level, fitness, ability to manipulate the operating system / interface to the gun (DA/SA, DAO, trigger pull weight, safeties, etc). So, without all of that, how in the world is someone who doesn't know that person supposed to come up with a better answer than the person in question?

    My recommendation is to obtain competent training in a variety of guns: revolver, pistol, rifle, shotgun. And then to supplement that with lots of range time, since there is nothing that can replace actual hands-on, saddle time. After that, a person has a chance at making a good decision based on reality, as opposed to WAG.
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  8. #22
    Member Array crankshop1000's Avatar
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    A .22 semi auto is the best starting point for anybody.Laser sights will help too. The laser gives real time feedback on how important details like trigger pull and breathing effect accuracy.Move up in the power range as your proficiency increases. You can shoot a whole bunch of .22 for what it costs for centerfire.

  9. #23
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GM View Post
    A question often asked in other forums and also in DC is, what kind of gun a person without previous gun experience should buy; furthermore, that person wants the gun just for causal shooting. I guess that “casual shooting” does not imply a CC firearm, but a gun for home defense which is not going to visit the range very often (that is the way I interpret it). Some people recommend a good revolver, 3” or 4” 357 because it is a well proved option. My knowledge about revolvers is limited; however, I think that a 3” 357 can be a little difficult - if not pretty nasty - to shoot for someone with non gun experience and that wants a gun “just for casual shooting”. Actually, I should recommend that person not to get a handgun, but a 20 gauge pump shotgun, which does not have much recoil at all and is very easy to use; just point and pull the trigger. And if he/she definitely wants a handgun, I do not consider that a 3” or 4” 357 is very appropriate. I am not making a statement here, I am just asking because I might have missed something.
    The 4" Revolver, chambered in .357 Magnum can be loaded with standard pressure 38 Special, 38 Special +P, or .357 Magnum loads. I'd say you missed the versatility aspect.

    Biker

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