Does Recoil Matter?

This is a discussion on Does Recoil Matter? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; For Carry guns and self-defensive purposes, the odds are (God forbid we do have to defense ourselves) it will be at very close and personal ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 24

Thread: Does Recoil Matter?

  1. #1
    Member Array jwalker497's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    472

    Does Recoil Matter?

    For Carry guns and self-defensive purposes, the odds are (God forbid we do have to defense ourselves) it will be at very close and personal distances. With that in mind, is recoil really a factor when choosing a carry gun??

    I ask because I always hear about the people who tout the 9mm for the speed and accuracy of followup shots, well if you five feet from the Bad guy, is this really important?? Chances are your probably going to hit them if you keep it pointed at them and just dump the mag, right? I mean to think about it further, self defense shooters probably don't even aim at all, it's point and shoot.

    Granted, it it were competition shooting, and a person needed to be precise and speed matter with their shots and a little more distance thrown in the mix, i get the argument and agree completely then that recoil would mean something.

    But for Self-Defense purposes, is recoil really that big of a concern?

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member
    Array nn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    7,120
    The right gun in .40---no; too light a gun----yes.

  4. #3
    Member Array jwalker497's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    472
    What's too light? Glock 27? PM40? PPS 40? 239?

  5. #4
    Member Array kdydak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    158
    Recoil is a MUCH bigger deal when shooting one handed. In an SD situation you are likely to be moving (and fast) and your target will be moving (and fast). When moving quickly it is very difficult if not impossible to keep two hands on a gun and point it at a target.

    I have also read that in many police shootings that were researched, the police officers under stress shot one handed even when they could have used two hands without issues. It seems it is a natural human tendency under stress to fight 2x "one handed" rather then use both hands together.

    I personally found that I could not control and handle anything more then 9mm at speed using just one hand. Two handed the difference between 9mm and 40s&w was manageable, but downshift to one hand and I could not control the gun shooting 40s&w and 357sig.

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    Posts
    3,172
    I can get back on target just as quick with my 45's as I can with my 9mm's. The 45 kicks more, but gets back on target just about as quick..

    Once I learned how to handle the recoil and track the sights, I realized recoil had little to do with how quickly I shot.

    Now, lightweight Glocks in 40, for instance, are not nearly as fun to shoot for me though.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Gulf Coast of Florida
    Posts
    9,366
    I think recoil does matter if it is to such an extent that you are not comfortable shooting the gun (especially one handed) and flinch in anticipation of heavy recoil causing accuracy problems. With practice, and knowing what to expect and becoming proficient with it, it becomes less of an issue. If you're not comfortable with the amount of recoil, it will impact your ability with the weapon.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
    No Guns, No Safety, No Peace.


    Guns are like sex and air...its no big deal until YOU can't get any.

  8. #7
    Member Array Jbabbler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Atlantaish
    Posts
    393
    In my humble opinion, recoil matters less and less the more you train with a gun. As you learn its characteristics and begin to develop muscle memory your confidence and proficiency will go up and recoil will be a negligible factor.

  9. #8
    Member Array wolf88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    oklahoma
    Posts
    199
    Think back to the first time you shot a 9mm you could not double tap it accurately so what do you do? Practice of course and guess what you learn to control it and then you can its the same way with just about any caliber handgun out there practice practice practice and you can learn to control it you should only carry what you feel comfortable with. practice is the solver of 99% of shooting issues.

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array searcher 45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    TEXAS
    Posts
    4,152
    FBI said 80% of gunfights are 6ft or under.

    I believe that speed on target shooting is very important.

    At 6ft 380 HP are very effective without so much over penetration.

    When it happens up close and very fast you may not have time to check out who is behind the BG.
    NOT LIVING IN FEAR, JUST READY!!!
    I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness,
    nor the arrow for its swiftness,
    nor the warrior for his glory.
    I love only that which they defend.
    -J.R.R. Tolkien

  11. #10
    Member Array monk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Danville, Virginia
    Posts
    159
    Quote Originally Posted by searcher 45 View Post
    FBI said 80% of gunfights are 6ft or under.

    I believe that speed on target shooting is very important.

    At 6ft 380 HP are very effective without so much over penetration.

    When it happens up close and very fast you may not have time to check out who is behind the BG.
    Not to drag this off subject to far, but being 1 in the morning and not much going on anyway..... I was wondering about(Have heard this quite a few times)"OVER PENETRATION".... I have a .380 and everything seems to be about it not getting much penetration. Then I see a few of these comments about trying to keep it from over penetrating....Please if you could 'splan-me.... Thx.... Monk
    Chinese Proverb:
    "When someone shares something of value with you and you benefit from it, you have a moral obligation to share it with others."
    VCDL member (DE.357;Ruger 4" GP-100 .357;Ruger 2.2" SP-101 cc hammer .357;BT .380cc.

  12. #11
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    26,720
    The fact is, recoil does move the barrel axis off-line. It'll do that whether plinking, in competition, or in a legitimate self-defense situation. Logic dictates it must have an effect and, in order to get that next shot on target, that you'll need to handle the recoil and get that muzzle back to where it belongs. Call it "point" shooting or aiming or something else, but the step needs to be done.

    As I have not been in a situation where I have had to fire on another human, I can't say for certain what the effect of recoil has been on me in self-defense situations, other than what I just described applies in other situations in which I have been.

    IMO, yes, recoil matters equally, as the physics are the same. Recoil happens, irrespective of whether the target is stationary and paper, or moving and shooting at you.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  13. #12
    Member Array HardcoreSlot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Spring Creek, Nevada
    Posts
    57
    FWIW
    I have NEVER shot a subcompact pistol ever.
    untill i bought my PPS 40 last week.
    I was nervous because my PX4 40 has a good deal of recoil. but the pps has almost nothing. I was very comfortable shooting it.
    Life is a game of chance, be prepared to throw down when its time to dance. If your young, enjoy it cuz your youth is gold and never waste time every single day you grow old. written is a page in the book for you, with hard times and bad luck to see what you will do.

  14. #13
    Member Array louie19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    116
    Well - let's think about this:

    If you had a .22, you'd have no problem with recoil and could probably shoot on target easily.

    If on the other hand, you had a Desert Eagle .50 AE caliber pistol, well I'll just quote Desert Eagle Pistol - Is it a good choice for self-defense?:
    I've seen it many times at the range, when the novice shoots .50 AE, his first shot is more or less good, like somewhere 8-10, but after being hammered by that first round, all the attention goes not to aiming, but "HOW DO I HOLD THIS GUN NOT TO HIT MY HEAD".
    So yes, recoil does matter. Training can help reduce this.

  15. #14
    Senior Member Array Avenger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    nowhere, usa
    Posts
    713
    Some interesting views on this thread. What it comes down to is YES, recoil does matter. But what matters more is how you manage it. This depends mostly on shooting technique. Even at 5ft, if you dont manage the recoil of a 9mm properly your group will look like a shotgun when shooting point rapid. Even aimed double taps will be off. I teach shoot to kill, not to wound. This means that your groups should be tight even point shooting. how you manage the recoil is the MAJOR deciding factor in subsequent shots. I have seen people rapidly point shoot a DE .50 with a 2in group at 10ft! Its all technique and practice.

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array Rugergirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,954
    Avenger nailed it.
    Recoil will always be there, training should make it manageable.
    At least 50% of my range time is spent shooting one handed, strong and weak hand. Rapid fire, and moving and shooting where possible.
    I know that under stress, my shooting skills are likely to be half as good(or less) as punching holes in paper. The more I can practice and learn to control the recoil the better my chances will be in a defensive situation.
    Disclaimer: The posts made by this member are only the members opinion, not a reflection on anyone else, nor the group, and should not be cause for anyone to get their undergarments wedged in an uncomfortable position.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Glock 36 dual spring recoil system / and G-36 recoil
    By cammo in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: April 22nd, 2010, 05:54 PM
  2. WTT Commander recoil spring for Glock 19 recoil spring assembly [NC]
    By blgoode in forum Member Buy, Sell & Trade
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: June 16th, 2009, 10:18 PM
  3. Keep up your SA, no matter where you are
    By Paco in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 9th, 2009, 12:55 AM
  4. What's better...or does it matter?
    By major99 in forum Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: November 25th, 2008, 05:55 PM
  5. Does it really matter?
    By SelfDefense in forum Defensive Carry Guns
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: June 27th, 2007, 09:46 PM

Search tags for this page

does recoil matter
,

how much does recoil matter on aim

,
recoil factor
,
why recoil matters
Click on a term to search for related topics.