Things that go wrong with guns: Series 80 Safety (1911)

Things that go wrong with guns: Series 80 Safety (1911)

This is a discussion on Things that go wrong with guns: Series 80 Safety (1911) within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; My girlfriend uses a SIG 2nd gen GSR 1911 as her IDPA gun. It's got over 5,000 rounds through it and has actually been very ...

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Thread: Things that go wrong with guns: Series 80 Safety (1911)

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array kazzaerexys's Avatar
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    Things that go wrong with guns: Series 80 Safety (1911)

    My girlfriend uses a SIG 2nd gen GSR 1911 as her IDPA gun. It's got over 5,000 rounds through it and has actually been very accurate and reliable after having the original factory extractor replaced by SIG. Last summer, it went off to Grayguns for some improvements. Bruce Gray, who is generally critical of the GSR design overall for several reasons, actually commented to me that this one of the best examples of a GSR he has personally worked on.

    A couple of weeks ago, a failure-to-feed problem showed up. It looked like the incoming round was jamming the slide. After working the round loose, though, it turns out the slide itself was hanging up short of battery. I pulled the slide off and found some damage at the back of the frame next to the hammer; there was definitely a rough spot sticking up that could account for the problem.

    I posted on SIGforum and Roy, the 1911 guy from Grayguns, recognized this as a gun he had worked on and had me ship it back to him.

    I got a call from him where he asked, "So, did you remove the firing pin block on purpose?"

    It seems that the screw holding the Series 80 firing pin block in place had worked its way loose, the block had dropped down and impacted the frame, causing the damage, and then had finished falling out entirely.

    So, the first lesson for the day is, when people talk about a gun having a particular feature and just giving it "more parts to fail," that's a serious consideration. (I don't consider a Series 80 safety to be a necessary feature; it just happens to be the design of the gun my g/f picked out for herself.)

    The second lesson for the day is, when you take your gun apart, really look over it. I focused on the frame issue and never noticed that the firing pin block was missing. I feel kind of stupid about that, although I tell myself that I got the request to ship it back to GGI before I really got in to diagnosing the problem.

    Anyway, that's your public service announcement for the day. Carry on.
    “What is a moderate interpretation of [the Constitution]? Halfway between what it says and [...] what you want it to say?” —Justice Antonin Scalia

    SIG: P220R SS Elite SAO, P220R SAO, P220R Carry, P226R Navy, P226, P239/.40S&W, P2022/.40S&W; GSR 5", P6.


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    Member Array Emrah's Avatar
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    Which screw is this? I had a C3 model and didn't see a screw. I'd like to see pics if you have it though.

    On a related note, my Taurus PT-1911's firing pin safety recently gave me trouble. Every so often it wouldn't fire (dry firing). I couldn't pull the trigger. I took it apart and thought it was the disconnector. It was actually the "barbell" that is the firing pin block getting stuck in the up position. Granted, the spring behind it was a replacement one that I cut to size. I guess it was too short. Still trying to figure out how this is connected to me not being able to pull the trigger, but it solved the problem when I took the FPS out. Need to order a new one.

    Emrah

  3. #3
    JD
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    While I'm no fan of the Series 80 FPS, and while I can't speak for the Sig, there's no "screw" in the Colt design of the FPS.


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    Distinguished Member Array kazzaerexys's Avatar
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    On the SIG GSR, there is a small two-hole screw (often called a "trash lid" or "manhole cover") on the right rear side of the slide; it may be there because it also helps hold in the SIG's external extractor; I don't know about that. But apparently one of its functions is to hold the firing pin block in place.

    This GSR is the only Series 80 design 1911 I've ever personally handled, so I don't have a basis for comparing it to others.

    Here's a thread from 1911forum that shows some pictures:

    * Help with Caspian XR/Sig GSR manhole cover - 1911Forum
    “What is a moderate interpretation of [the Constitution]? Halfway between what it says and [...] what you want it to say?” —Justice Antonin Scalia

    SIG: P220R SS Elite SAO, P220R SAO, P220R Carry, P226R Navy, P226, P239/.40S&W, P2022/.40S&W; GSR 5", P6.

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    Member Array BT1911's Avatar
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    The only screw on the 1911 is the four that hold the grips on...

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    Distinguished Member Array kazzaerexys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BT1911 View Post
    The only screw on the 1911 is the four that hold the grips on...
    Perhaps you'd care to follow the above linked thread to pictures of the screw in question. Oddly enough, not all 1911 pattern pistols are exactly the same.
    “What is a moderate interpretation of [the Constitution]? Halfway between what it says and [...] what you want it to say?” —Justice Antonin Scalia

    SIG: P220R SS Elite SAO, P220R SAO, P220R Carry, P226R Navy, P226, P239/.40S&W, P2022/.40S&W; GSR 5", P6.

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    Member Array BT1911's Avatar
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    Perhaps you'd care to follow the above linked thread to pictures of the screw in question
    Perhaps you'd care to learn about a gun's design before making lame comments. Thats not a screw in the picture. It's a hole in the firing pin lever showing you the hammer right next to it. The grips screws are the only screws on a 1911.

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    Member Array BT1911's Avatar
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    Perhaps you'd care to follow the above linked thread to pictures of the screw in question. Oddly enough, not all 1911 pattern pistols are exactly the same.
    My apologies. I assumed you were referring to the cutaway, not the link that shows that whatever it is bolt. We all know about what happens when we assume. Again, sorry for the last comment.

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