Made a dumb mistake yesterday...

Made a dumb mistake yesterday...

This is a discussion on Made a dumb mistake yesterday... within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Yesterday I was dry firing, but did not go to my safe room to dry fire. I dropped the magazine, racked the slide, and dropped ...

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Thread: Made a dumb mistake yesterday...

  1. #1
    Member Array TheOhioan's Avatar
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    Made a dumb mistake yesterday...

    Yesterday I was dry firing, but did not go to my safe room to dry fire. I dropped the magazine, racked the slide, and dropped a pen in the barrel to ensure that the gun was safe. I did my dry firing then went and got my magazine and put it back in the gun(condition 3), then went back to working at my desk. Later I picked up my gun again to dry fire a few more times, pulled the trigger, heard the click then racked the slide, feeling the sickening feeling of a bullet moving into the chamber. I flipped out and unloaded the gun and put it in the safe.

    I am new to shooting and know my four rules, yet I disobeyed pointing it in a safe direction. I know I am smarter than that but it really made me realize that one simple mental hiccup could bring very grave consequences. I have also been handling my gun too much because of the "newness" of it. Either way this was irresponsible of me and I just wanted to post here and get it off my chest.


    I will not keep live ammo in my dry fire area from now on.

    The gun will only leave the holster to leave the safe, at the range, or in my dry fire area with no ammo around. I guess the big question I am asking myself is should I really continue to own this firearm after this negligence. I could have hurt myself or god forbid someone else. I have had a hard time dealing with this and would like some others input.

    Dan


  2. #2
    Member Array titleist's Avatar
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    You'll be fine. Stay on top of it, and move forward. No matter how careful we are, there is a simple statistical fact: the more you are around guns, the more likely you are to have an accident with a gun. I think when you get into a routine, safe behavior will become second nature. Just be careful not to get complacent as familiarity increases. When on the driving range my pops would always "leave on a good note", even leaving a few balls left in the tray, just to not take home a last bad swing into muscle memory to bring back the next time. I think you should grab that thing at next opportunity, be safe, and burn those bad habits. We all make mistakes, and you'd be suprised at the number of ND's the members of this board have had (myself included). I don't pretend to excuse these mistakes with "it happens", but I hope you will take this and not be so hard on yourself.

    Stay safe

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array Arko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheOhioan View Post
    I guess the big question I am asking myself is should I really continue to own this firearm after this negligence. I could have hurt myself or god forbid someone else. I have had a hard time dealing with this and would like some others input.

    Dan
    Only you can answer that question, and if you have any real doubt, you probably should be thinking hard.

    It sounds to me like you had a wake up call and a mulligan though, and my guess is you won't let it happen again.

    I would consider some professional training though to help build good habits and skills. (that goes for all of us-not singling you out)

    Glad is well.
    "Don't Tread on Me"

  4. #4
    Member Array TheOhioan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arko View Post
    Only you can answer that question, and if you have any real doubt, you probably should be thinking hard.

    It sounds to me like you had a wake up call and a mulligan though, and my guess is you won't let it happen again.

    I would consider some professional training though to help build good habits and skills. (that goes for all of us-not singling you out)

    Glad is well.
    I guess the thing that is really sticking with me is I bought this gun to protect myself and those I love, but instead could have really hurt somebody. While new to owning a gun, I was raised shooting guns and should know better than this. The only thing that is saving me from losing too much sleep is that whenever I actually have put the gun in condition one I am extremely cautious and will not put the gun anywhere else but the holster. I just keep trying to tell myself this is my one free pass to learn from this and if it happens again there is no one else but me to blame.

  5. #5
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    Reading your post, I think you missed the biggest mistake you made. It isn't removing the ammo from your dry firing area (although that is a smart thing to do) and it isn't pointing in a safe direction. ( and that of course is the number 1 rule).
    The most glaring mistake you made is not checking the condition of the pistol when you picked it back up. Always, always always press check the gun when you pick it up. If you are going to dry fire, open the action, stick your finger in the chamber, look as many times as you need to in order to be sure there is no mag and nothing in the chamber. You didn't do any of that the second time around. If you had, the whole thing would have been avoided.

    If you study AD/ND stories, most of them happened after an interruption in what they were doing. Just like your story. A simple condition status check every time you pick up a weapon will avoid a lot of accidents and near accidents.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  6. #6
    Member Array RockStrongo's Avatar
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    I think you have thought it out pretty well, and the fact that you are so hard on yourself is pretty admirable. Just keep a mental note of what just happened everytime you handle a gun and you won't repeat it. I guess what I am getting at is that everyone makes some type of mistakes with something new. Granted yours could have had very grave consequences, but even learning to drive you probably made a mistake or two that could have cost you. Learn from your mistake and take the suggestions that others threw out for taking a course. Ultimately, it is really you that has to decide how comfortable you are. Be safe!

  7. #7
    Distinguished Member Array Arko's Avatar
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    Granted, it was a serious mistake for sure, but So long as you consider this your one and only reminder to have absolute concentration on the gun every time you handle it from now, you should be able to move past it.

    For a short time, put ALL the ammo away, triple check the chamber and magazine, then check again and work that gun over, and over and over until you're comfortable with it again. Don't handle it scared with live ammo. Wait until you've gotten past it a bit.
    "Don't Tread on Me"

  8. #8
    Member Array TheOhioan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Reading your post, I think you missed the biggest mistake you made. It isn't removing the ammo from your dry firing area (although that is a smart thing to do) and it isn't pointing in a safe direction. ( and that of course is the number 1 rule).
    The most glaring mistake you made is not checking the condition of the pistol when you picked it back up. Always, always always press check the gun when you pick it up. If you are going to dry fire, open the action, stick your finger in the chamber, look as many times as you need to in order to be sure there is no mag and nothing in the chamber. You didn't do any of that the second time around. If you had, the whole thing would have been avoided.

    If you study AD/ND stories, most of them happened after an interruption in what they were doing. Just like your story. A simple condition status check every time you pick up a weapon will avoid a lot of accidents and near accidents.
    This is very true, and thats what I have been trying to do every time is triple check when I dry fire, but this mental lapse could have cost me. I think I got too comfortable and didn't keep enough respect for the gun and what this instrument is truly made to do.

  9. #9
    Member Array mauser1959's Avatar
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    We all drill our safety precautions into our heads, and yet many firearms instructors tell of well trained people having accidental shootings. The weird thing about that in my mind is that most of them happened during "dry" firing. That tells me that no matter what you have been doing it is imperative to always check the chamber and pistol condition. I do not know if you have kids, but if you do , how many times have you drilled into your kids minds the very safety rule that you broke about checking chamber. As another poster said, you got your mulligan, think about it and move on; doubt it is a mistake you will make again. Just keep your head up, time to stop beating yourself up. Guns are like gasoline, if not used properly they can cause a lot of damage, used properly they do us a lot of good.

    One thing that might sound silly to you, but I always reload a fresh round into a chamber, that tells me that the gun is always loaded. Makes me perhaps a bit more cautious about how the gun is handled.

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array GWRedDragon's Avatar
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    Personally, in addition to checking the chamber anytime I pick up a gun, I have an additional system to separate loaded from unloaded: the holster.

    If the gun is loaded, it is in a holster. If I remove a gun from a holster, I always unload it. If I load a gun, I always immediately put it in a holster.

    To me this just seems like a good idea anyway. If you just leave your pistol loaded on a table, it's always possible you could reach for something else on the table and accidentally hit the trigger.

    I also have multiple of the same gun, so it functions as a failsafe against mixing up the loaded one and the unloaded one (I am still also careful to check).
    "Trust in God with hand on sword" -Inscription on my family's coat of arms from medieval England
    ---Carry options: G26/MTAC, PF9/MiniTuck, PPK/Pocket, USP40/OWB---
    ---NOTE: I am not an expert. If I ever start acting like a know-it-all, please call me on it immediately. ---

  11. #11
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    Not that there is any substitute for safe gun handling and checking the chamber every time you pick it up but to augment good safety habits maybe think about getting one of these training barrels for your dry fire exercises.

    511 Tactical Training Barrel

  12. #12
    Member Array ccwguy's Avatar
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    It's good that you are being a little hard on yourself, but don't let the experience keep you from doing what you want; defending yourself and family. Live and learn.

    You lived. Hopefully, you learned. Move on.

  13. #13
    Member Array TVille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Reading your post, I think you missed the biggest mistake you made. It isn't removing the ammo from your dry firing area (although that is a smart thing to do) and it isn't pointing in a safe direction. ( and that of course is the number 1 rule).
    The most glaring mistake you made is not checking the condition of the pistol when you picked it back up. Always, always always press check the gun when you pick it up. If you are going to dry fire, open the action, stick your finger in the chamber, look as many times as you need to in order to be sure there is no mag and nothing in the chamber. You didn't do any of that the second time around. If you had, the whole thing would have been avoided.

    If you study AD/ND stories, most of them happened after an interruption in what they were doing. Just like your story. A simple condition status check every time you pick up a weapon will avoid a lot of accidents and near accidents.
    One of my instructors related a story where he almost shot his cat - same thing - distracted, picked the gun back up, pulled the trigger and it went BOOM! Only damage was to his nerves and the wall. As SIXTO said, ALWAYS check when you pick the gun up. Always.

  14. #14
    Member Array CharlieP's Avatar
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    Think about it ...

    I try to avoid picking up a gun in a casual manner, or when I am distracted by something. Dry firing promotes being casual with a gun - in that sense it is a bad idea all by itself.

    But the same rules apply to a lot of other things we do every day - driving a car - operating power tools - crossing a busy street on foot. But when I make a driving mistake I do not consider giving up driving - I think about how to avoid that mistake in the future.

  15. #15
    Member Array merischino's Avatar
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    I'm a new person to guns as well. FWIW, here's what I've been doing to train myself: using an airsoft pellet gun at home for target practice, "dry firing", you name it. I've been insisting to myself that I must always treat this as though it were a "real" gun, so that every time I pick it up, I check the magazine, check the chamber, keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, etc. Every time I pick it up, my index finger is where it is supposed to be, not on the trigger. When I prepare to shoot, I practice the same 6 fundamentals that are necessary for proper shooting with my Glock 22.

    Since I'm more than a little wet behind the ears, I expect that I will be making mistakes on occasion. I'm just trying to remove the lethal error possibility by using the plastic firearm as much as possible. Once I'm truly comfortable with my gun handling, I'll start using the actual Glock for dry firing practice on a regular basis. Will probably also start using it with dummy and/or snap cap rounds at home for actual safe target practice at home. Will then also probably include dummy rounds in mags at the range for practice training for FTF/FTEs and the whole taprackbang thing.

    I have planned out a progression. For me, until I'm feeling really really comfortable with my own abilities, I'm not carrying around a loaded gun. That choice is up to every individual gun owner, when to carry and when not to.

    I like what Sixto said very much -- about developing the habit of checking the condition of the gun every time you touch it. That way, if something interrupts you, it doesn't matter whether you accurately remember the last known condition of the gun -- you'll always, always check it. I may be going a little overboard with the plastic hassle, but the basic premise is the same. there is no such thing as an unloaded gun.

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