Custom Made or Home Made?

This is a discussion on Custom Made or Home Made? within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; So a guy decides to make holsters. At what point does he graduate from "Home Made" to "Custom Made"? I've seen some pretty shoddy looking ...

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Thread: Custom Made or Home Made?

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
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    Custom Made or Home Made?

    So a guy decides to make holsters. At what point does he graduate from "Home Made" to "Custom Made"? I've seen some pretty shoddy looking holsters for sale on the forums that I'd hardly call "Custom".
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Array BruceGibson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Husker View Post
    So a guy decides to make holsters. At what point does he graduate from "Home Made" to "Custom Made"? I've seen some pretty shoddy looking holsters for sale on the forums that I'd hardly call "Custom".
    Great question! I'd venture to say that the commitment to investing a whole ton of money in materials and equipment, along with a huge investment of time--hopefully combined with continued improvement, quality, integrity, and customer satisfaction--would all come together at some point and result in a "custom" Maker.

    In reality, I don't have a clue.

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    Senior Member Array Pure Kustom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceGibson View Post
    Great question! I'd venture to say that the commitment to investing a whole ton of money in materials and equipment, along with a huge investment of time--hopefully combined with continued improvement, quality, integrity, and customer satisfaction--would all come together at some point and result in a "custom" Maker.

    In reality, I don't have a clue.
    What he said................I think

  5. #4
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    I have no idea, I'll venture a guess.

    I think a custom holster maker designation is determined by a lengthy proven track record of all aspects of the trade (see Milt Sparks below).

    That designation can only come from the many purchasers who prove the maker to be worthy. The expectations of a custom holster purchaser are high. They of course, value quality leather and the pride of ownership and are willing to spend money to get a quality product.

    I think some of the true custom high marks right now are;

    Brommeland's presentation grade liquid leather boning

    Pure Kustom's genius design of the Black Ops Pro

    Delfatti's craftsmanship

    Milt Spark's proven track record of the whole package deal of customer service, craftsmanship and quality.
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

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    Member Array hengst's Avatar
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    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder....but yes some folks sell bs and think it is the best..If the seller has a fast or non-existent turnaround time, no referells, none or an amateur, homemade website or crappy unprofessional photos then they are still homemade....I'll let them practice with someone elses hard earned money
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  7. #6
    Member Array Matt Del Fatti's Avatar
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    Custom Made : made to order, according to the customer's specifications.

    While the definition of doesn't specify "of high quality", I think most folks feel that it's implied.

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array Rugergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Del Fatti View Post
    Custom Made : made to order, according to the customer's specifications.

    While the definition doesn't specify "of high quality", I think most folks feel that it's implied.
    Agreed!
    If I am not happy enough with my own products, how can I expect a customer to be happy with it.
    If the maker of "custom" item, has high standards, their product will show it.
    Disclaimer: The posts made by this member are only the members opinion, not a reflection on anyone else, nor the group, and should not be cause for anyone to get their undergarments wedged in an uncomfortable position.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Array adaman04's Avatar
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    When you are producing quality products that are consistent in appearance, quality, etc.

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    VIP Member Array MNBurl's Avatar
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    I think Bruce hit the nail on the head.
    MNBurl

    "If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking" - George S. Patton.

  11. #10
    Senior Member Array Avenger's Avatar
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    Homemade, I can make a homemade holster! I have absolutely NO experience with leather, kydex, nylon, whatever. NONE! But I can make you a homemade holster fur your purtty gun!

    Custom made: That is where an experienced craftsman makes something unique for that one individual. Now, others might want the same thing. But this craftsman hand makes those orders using pride, time, attention to detail, and care.

    I am sure that every "custom maker" started out making "homemade" junk. But they learned from mistakes, honed their skills, and figured it out. I think you graduate from being a "homemade maker" to a "custom maker" when someone who bought one, buys another, and tells their friends.

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    Senior Member Array Ride4TheBrand's Avatar
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    It's like footwear. Some folks go for sneakers, while others like the anaconda cowboy boots, and I've seen people carry their Glocks in rags while others carry them in top of the line kydex.

    I will say this, though: I will not carry my Glock in a sock.
    "We must remember that one man is much
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    who is trained in the severest school."
    ~Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War

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    Senior Member Array bigo5552000's Avatar
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    well i would say something that is "custom made" only means it is made for one particular thing. there isn't another one. i dont think "custom made" refers to the quality. just that it is a one of a kind. it could be amazing or crap, but it is the only one. while "homemade" just means it was made in the home. and also does not refer to the quality of the item. it could be amazing or crap as well. just my .02
    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction."-Einstein

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    Member Array T. Kanaley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Husker View Post
    So a guy decides to make holsters. At what point does he graduate from "Home Made" to "Custom Made"? I've seen some pretty shoddy looking holsters for sale on the forums that I'd hardly call "Custom".
    Perhaps the question would be better phrased as at what point does the maker graduate from a hobbyist to a pro.

    Firstly, some hobbyist’s are capable of doing spectacular work that rivals even that of the seasoned pro. On the flip side of the coin, there are some so-called pros that habitually produce work that most serious hobbyists would cut up in pieces to be thrown out with the day’s garbage.

    Some pros never get beyond the hobbyist stage on how they run their business. One of the things I emphasize with our new hires is; “first you learn how to do the job right, however long that takes, and then you learn how to do it fast!”

    Most hobbyists can dwell in the first phase forever and never graduate to the second, because after all, they are hobbyists and only do stuff for themselves and maybe a few friends. Some pros bypass the “learn how to do it right” phase altogether and move right into the second, which is usually apparent by the workmanship of the product or lack thereof. Some pros never move beyond the first phase, which makes them more or less, nothing more than a glorified hobbyist. They build an exceptional holster, but they build them in the timeframe that would be more likened to the hobbyist building a holster for themselves where there are no worries about how long it takes, being efficient, servicing multiple customers, making money, etc. They never learn to do the same quality, quickly.

    Let me make it clear that there’s nothing wrong with treating each holster as if you were building it for yourself, in fact that is what the professional strives for. But if you’re truly a master at your trade, you learn to deal with all aspects of the job and not just one single phase of it. That is when you have graduated.

    Just my .02

    T
    Second Best is not an option

  15. #14
    Senior Member Array bigo5552000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Kanaley View Post
    Perhaps the question would be better phrased as at what point does the maker graduate from a hobbyist to a pro.

    Firstly, some hobbyist’s are capable of doing spectacular work that rivals even that of the seasoned pro. On the flip side of the coin, there are some so-called pros that habitually produce work that most serious hobbyists would cut up in pieces to be thrown out with the day’s garbage.

    Some pros never get beyond the hobbyist stage on how they run their business. One of the things I emphasize with our new hires is; “first you learn how to do the job right, however long that takes, and then you learn how to do it fast!”

    Most hobbyists can dwell in the first phase forever and never graduate to the second, because after all, they are hobbyists and only do stuff for themselves and maybe a few friends. Some pros bypass the “learn how to do it right” phase altogether and move right into the second, which is usually apparent by the workmanship of the product or lack thereof. Some pros never move beyond the first phase, which makes them more or less, nothing more than a glorified hobbyist. They build an exceptional holster, but they build them in the timeframe that would be more likened to the hobbyist building a holster for themselves where there are no worries about how long it takes, being efficient, servicing multiple customers, making money, etc. They never learn to do the same quality, quickly.

    Let me make it clear that there’s nothing wrong with treating each holster as if you were building it for yourself, in fact that is what the professional strives for. But if you’re truly a master at your trade, you learn to deal with all aspects of the job and not just one single phase of it. That is when you have graduated.

    Just my .02

    T


    agreed! +1
    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction."-Einstein

  16. #15
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Kanaley View Post
    But if you’re truly a master at your trade, you learn to deal with all aspects of the job and not just one single phase of it. That is when you have graduated.

    Just my .02

    T
    I think that is the most important principal mentioned to date not just for the holster trade.

    Tony - Your response goes to my proposition that Milt Sparks is the all around benchmark in the industry.
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

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