Concealed Carry Methods

This is a discussion on Concealed Carry Methods within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Bumper, my experience with the Pager Pal was also notso-hotso. It looked like I had a tumor. I sold it to someone on Glock Talk ...

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 32

Thread: Concealed Carry Methods

  1. #16
    Member Array Erich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    6000' above sea level - Albuquerque NM USA
    Posts
    369
    Bumper, my experience with the Pager Pal was also notso-hotso. It looked like I had a tumor. I sold it to someone on Glock Talk for a steal.

    You know, when I was in college in the mid-\'80s, I just did IWB or a belt slide, and covered up with an overshirt. That doesn\'t work so well for me given my present life as a \"civilized\" human being. I\'ve been looking for something that worked for me for years, and I\'m just so happy to have found that SmartCarry does so well for me.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #17
    DC Founder
    Array Bumper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    20,045
    Someone recently posted that their wife didn\'t like them to wear the SmartCarry because waitresses checked them out a bit too closely. I think I might have to have one

    Seriously, it appears everyone here that has posted about them (SmartCarry) likes them.

  4. #18
    Member Array tminer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    27
    The post was a copy of what Clint Smith wrote in gun magazine publication from a few years ago. You can find it out on the web if you search for it.

    I found it very interesting but like some here I disagree with some of it. Everyone is different . Different body types and different life habits.

    I have found that my HBE tuckable pro (iwb) is the best for me. It conceals well and fits me very good. I have an rafterS (owb) holster and I have to wear a long shirt to cover it. To each his own. I say try all the options and get what works for you. Make sure you practice the draw to make it second nature to you. Don\'t just make the holster comfortable to you and then not practice.

  5. #19
    Member Array logistar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Louisville Ky
    Posts
    68
    From other posts here you might know I am a fan of the shoulder harness. There is something I didn\'t know about them that I found out rather recently.

    Someone on another board brought up the idea of weaing one under your shirt! I had never thought of that and assumed it would be a bad idea.

    One night I decided to try it. I was meeting a friend for dinner that knew I carried. I selected a good shirt for this and worn the rig between my T-shirt and this shirt.

    My friend kept looking at me and eventually had this comment. \"I never thought I\'d see you out when you weren\'t carrying.\" I was pleased.

    Since then I have occasionally carried that way. I do tend to buy shirts that don\'t print and that have snaps instead of buttons so that I can \"tear\" the shirt open with my left hand and draw with my right. If you haven\'t tried it......

    - FWIW
    Logistar

  6. #20
    Member Array clipse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    453
    I posted this on a couple of forums before. I thought I would add it here as it seemed to fit. Please don\'t take it the wrong way. I\'m not trying to distract from the original post, just adding to it.


    I\'m not going to discuss the kind of gun used. There are way too many opinions to spark up that kind of discussion. What I do want to talk about is the mode of concealing you weapon. There are many different ways to conceal a handgun and several different reasons why one should choose a certain way of carrying concealed. First lets talk about things to think about while deciding your preferred mode of carry.

    There are four main things to think of when considering your mode of CCW: Comfort, Security, Speed, and Concealability. Each one of this works again another and you will have to give up some of one to gain more of another.

    Comfort: You don\'t want carrying a handgun to be uncomfortable. You may find that wearing your handgun on your belt is the most comfortable but it may not be the most concealable. Comfort is still something that should be heavily considered because of that fact that if something you wear is uncomfortable then eventually you will not want to wear it, which defeats the purpose of CCW. What good is you gun going to do you when the stuff hits the fan if its in your sock drawer? Also consider what is more comforting that comfortable. I know a two shot .22 derringer would be very comfortable but I would feel alot better about have something a bit more substantial if the stuff really hits the fan.

    Security: Obviously you don\'t want your handgun to fall on the floor while your eating at a fancy restaurant. You also don\'t need for someone else(badguy) to have immediate access to it in a scuffle. Security, though works against speed. You can have your handgun secured so well on your body that you can\'t get to in the heat of the moment. Security can also work against comfort.

    Speed: You definitely need to be able to bring you handgun into play as quickly as you possibly can. Remember that the time that it takes you to draw your handgun may be your last moment. So make it as quickly as possible. Scary thought, I know, but you have to consider that as a factor. Any situation in which you will have to use a handgun in defense is a VERY VERY scary thought.

    Concealabitly: Obviously CCW(Concealed Carry Weapon) was designed for the weapon to be concealed. I don\'t think even printing is acceptable. All its going to do is draw unwanted attention and scare people. As much as I hate it, some people are afraid of firearms. Why frighten people if you don\'t need to?


    Now onto the different ways you can carry concealed.

    IWB: (Inside the Waist Band) Generally when carrying like this it will be in a holster that has loops the over the top of the waistband and around the belt holding it in place. When using an IWB I would suggest a reinforced opening so when you draw the pistol, you holster doesn\'t collapse. I won\'t lie, some people don\'t use a holster and just shove the handgun own their pants and call it good. While it may work for them, I don\'t recommend this as it looks like the trigger could catch on something on the way in and discharge. This is called \'Mexican Carry\'. I don\'t know why, it just is,

    OWB: (Outside the Waist Band) This is generally how you see cops/detectives carrying on TV. There are several different holster for OWB.(pancake, slide, paddle, etc.) I have a pancake holster that has three belt loops for different cants. I like this way of carrying during the winter as it is hard(almost impossible) to conceal an OWB holstered handgun in just a t-shirt.

    SOB: (Small of Back) This requires a holster that holds the gun almost horizontal and it is to be worn right int he small of you back. This is argued at times whether or not it is very smart to carry like this. If you get in a fight and get knocked flat on your back it is not ideal for you to have a chunk of steel right up against your spine. Also if you drive much this is not recommended. Getting rearended is a common occurance and a firearm in the small of your back is no ideal in a rearend collision. Still, it works for many folks.

    Shoulder Holster: (Bond, James Bond) This is pretty self explanatory. If you have ever seen any James Bond movie you know where his gun is. This does require a jacket of some sort to be worn constantly. Unless you get one of the types that goes under a shirt. I don\'t really like the ones that go under a shirt because not only do you have to go across you body to get to the handgun but also lifting up you shirt. It takes to long for me. But, many people find themselves in situations that call for \'deep concealment\'. These kinds of holster work great for that.

    Ankle Holster: This one is also pretty self explanatory. Alot of companies make holsters that go around you ankle an hold a very compact handgun. These look awkward to get too. Conversely this would work really well while driving a car where most holster wouldn\'t.

    Pocket Carry: Many holster makers make holster that fit into a pocket and hold the gun upright for easier draw and to keep things for getting to the trigger until you want them to. Pocket Carry should not be done without a holster. There are also holsters for spare magazines that fit into pockets as well. Pocket holster have up swept points that grab on the pocket while drawing you gun an keeps the holster in the pocket. If you have big enough pockets I think pocket carry can be great for smaller handguns. Another thing that I will consider \'Pocket Carry'is secret compartments in some vests and jackets. Places like Royal Robbins and the like make vests that have a specail pocket with velcro to hold a holster. I would think the jacket versions of these would be better than vests because, like fanny packs, vests generally \'scream'gun.

    Smart Carry: Smart carry is probably the most interesting carry method. It is a holster that from the front looks like underwear. In fact the other company that makes the smart carry type rig calls it \'Thunderwear\'. I get a really big kick out of this one. It doesn\'t work for me but really does for alot of people. Basically is is a band that you wrap around your waist that has two pocket in the front to accommodate a handgun and mag or speed loader. It amazes me but it does really work for alot of people.

    Belly Band: The belly band is just that. It is a band that goes around your belly and has a holster area that holds the gun. This works really well for certain types of people. It may not but the quickest to get to but it does conceal very very well.

    Fanny pack holster: Many companies have quick access fanny pack holsters that look alot like regular fanny packs. This would by far be a very comfortable way to carry. Some will argue that a fanny pack \'screams'gun. I have to disagree to a point. While to you and I it may \'scream'gun, I highly doubt the average citizen even realizes that this is a possible or even popular method of concealed carry. We are not worried about the average citizen as much as we are badguys, though. Remember bad guys are always as dumb as we think and they will look for tell tell signs of people packing. Fanny packs are one of those signs.

    Off body carry: This would include purses, briefcases, fake day-planners, etc. This is a convenient way to carry, but I feel like someone who carries this way is more likely to leave the gun unattended. It is much more difficult for me to leave my gun somewhere if it were IWB. Also if you have kids this would not be the best idea. Think about this, you drive your kids to preschool. They are in the backseat. Where do you put your purse? Most women that I have seen put it between the two front seats. And kid could very easily access it without your knowledge. Besides that, how many times have your kids gotten into your stuff be it purse, briefcase, gym bag, or otherwise.


    A couple of other things to consider

    Wardrobe: You will need to be prepared to possibly change some of your wardrobe. For IWB holsters, pants will need to be and inch or two bigger than you usually wear. Also the type of shirt you wear is a consideration. I generally wear a short sleeved button up plaid shirt untucked and unbuttoned. I have since I was in High School so no big change for me. This though is a great setup to conceal a handgun. Some wish to wear a photographers/safari/fishermans vest to cover a handgun. While this does work to conceal it, it is like the fanny pack. It is one of those things that gun people and badguys alike may(most likely will) associate with carrying a concealed weapon.

    Your daily life: Think about the things you do on an average day. Do you spend alot of time in a car/truck/semi or do you bend over much in public? If so then a SOB holster may not be best for you. If you spend alot of time a car/truck/semi then a shoulder or cross draw holster would be great or like I mentioned above an ankle holster seems ideal for this as well.

    Other things to carry: A couple of things you might consider carrying in addition to a firearm is either an extra magazine or a speed loader. Remember you can never have too much ammo. For a semi-auto handgun, it has been said that the magazine is the weakest part of the pistol. 95% of all malfunctions with a semi-auto handgun can be quickly fixed with a fresh magazine. As for a revolver, generally they are only 5 or 6 shots. You never know when you will need more. Also consider carrying a flashlight. High intensity flashlights that take lithium camera batteries are great. I usually carry a couple of flashlights because batteries can go dead without you knowing it. Besides the fact that you are more likely to be in a self defense situation in the dark that you will if you were in daylight or under a street light.


    I had alot of questions when I started looking at how I was going to carry my handgun for defense. I hope this helps some of the people like me that had a hard time finding answers.

    For a list of holster makers follow the link. http://www.missouricarry.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3270


    [I got the comfort, security, speed, concealability part from and article written by Clint Smith. Its not word for word. I just took the four parts and put my own words with it as I don\'t have the article on hand]

    A special thanks also to Raytacer, 54JNoll, Greg_Sackett, TomZ, and John Ross for helping me get more ideas to add.

  7. #21
    New Member Array urquell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    5
    I was in my CCW class Thursday night and I wanted to get a similar discussion going during one of the breaks. The instuctor stands up and asks, how big a gun do you think I\'m carrying?\" After a few guesses were thrown out, and I couldn\'t tell that he was carrying anything, he pulls a 4\" S&W 500 from his pants! He had it in a smartcarry belt. That demonstration made me rethink the idea that my beloved Glock 21 is too large. I am now determined to figure out a way to make carrying it work for me.

  8. #22
    Member Array Hitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    34
    One correction to that article posted. The HK briefcases are considered a Class 3 AOW not a DD as mentioned. They can be purchased with a $5.00 transfer fee or can be home built for other weapons on a Form 1 with a $200 tax.

  9. #23
    Member Array Erich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    6000' above sea level - Albuquerque NM USA
    Posts
    369
    clipse, good post. urquell, good story! :O

  10. #24
    Member Array scbair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    97
    Well, a number of folks have taken the post to task regarding the practicality of CCWm of full-sized service arms. I\'ll agree that casual wear poses no problem. I\'m 5'11\", 200 lbs, and have no problem concealing (comfortably) my M1911, P35, or 4\" M19 IWB under an untucked t-shirt.

    Remember, though, the comments re: professional/office/business attire. That\'s my situation. An untucked shirt would be a fashion faux pas! If I remove my jacket in the office (a common and accepted practice), a belt-holstered sidearm would be worse! This situation requires \"deeper\" concealment than does normal \"street\" carry.

    My own solution (to balance speed, power & accuracy: two handguns! A S&W M642, loaded with +P Nyclads, rides in a pocket holster in my front trouser pocket. Completely concealed, fast, and acceptable accuracy & power. One Speed Strip of spare ammo rides in another pocket.

    A Kimber Ultra CDP in .45 ACP is in a fanny pack (with 2 spare mags). While seated in my vehicle, it provides easier access than the pocketed .38, with increased accuracy, power, and firepower. If I can get to it in time, great! If not, I\'ll have the .38 snubbie.

    Everyone has to evaluate his or her own circumstances, and eqip themselves the best way possible.

  11. #25
    New Member Array GCLA Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1
    I was in my CCW class Thursday night and I wanted to get a similar discussion going during one of the breaks. The instuctor stands up and asks, how big a gun do you think I\'m carrying?\" After a few guesses were thrown out, and I couldn\'t tell that he was carrying anything, he pulls a 4\" S&W 500 from his pants! He had it in a smartcarry belt. That demonstration made me rethink the idea that my beloved Glock 21 is too large. I am now determined to figure out a way to make carrying it work for me.

    There\'s only one person I know who would even attempt to carry a S&W 500 like that.... (JR) :kay:

    Actually I have been carrying my Glock 21 lately with no problems. Uncle Mike\'s paddle holster strong side.

  12. #26
    New Member Array urquell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    5
    Originally posted by GCLA Terry

    There\'s only one person I know who would even attempt to carry a S&W 500 like that.... (JR) :kay:
    That\'s the guy! A big fan of big revolvers. He also owns, in his vast collection, a S&W AirLite Sc .44 magnum. It only weighs 26 ozs and would seem like a comfortable full-size carry option. I fired a cylinder full and the experience was just as painful as I thought it would be (but fun).

    While waiting for my permits (MO and FL) I am currently wearing the G21 in a smartcarry around the house. I still wish it was a little thinner. I also have a Glaco paddle holster for this gun which I like, but I\'m a tucked in shirt sort of guy. Still working on it.

  13. #27
    Member Array Gary Brommeland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,424
    Howdy!
    There is one thing to consider regarding the smartcarry/thunderwear type carry system: Under the high degree of stress associated with a real lethal force encounter, fine motor skills go out the window. Gross motor skills become almost involuntary in the hands as they clench into fists without any thought (and minimal control ) of the person in question. The result is that a rather sizeable number of people will actually discharge their firearm as soon as it clears the holster and their finger can come in contact with the trigger.
    With the muzzle of the firearm pointed at (or near ) the family jewels, you can see the potential for a catastrophic self inflicted end to the gunfight. Even if the muzzle does not actually point directly at your \"goods\", the muzzle blast from any serious caliber will still turn you into a eunoch.:O
    With a strong side, FBI cant (muzzle rear angle) holster, the worst you\'ll do is shoot a hole thru a butt cheek - definately a step up from the above scenario! :kay:
    \'Just a little something for ya\'ll to think about!

  14. #28
    DC Founder
    Array Bumper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    20,045
    Originally posted by Gary Brommeland
    Even if the muzzle does not actually point directly at your \"goods\", the muzzle blast from any serious caliber will still turn you into a eunoch.:O
    Ouch, I might as well stop carrying if that happened :O

  15. #29
    Member Array AZG23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surprise, Az
    Posts
    340
    Dry fire practice can solve these types of problems..practice, practice, practice...and then go live fire slowly/safely. It comes down to carrying in what is applicable to your specific needs...for how ever many situations you find you are in need of. And training with all of them to bocome proficient.

    I am not a big proponent of many different styles of carry and carrying many different guns. For the longest time I\'ve carried only .40 Glocks in IWB Kydex (Sidearmor/CTAC). I trained and practiced it. Situations and life changes and must be adapted to (IE: Work/Play/Home/etc). Now I only carry .40 Glocks in a CTAC or Smartcarry, and on a very rare occasion a Gould & Goodrich ankle holster. But I still practice all 3 forms of carry. And do dry fire/live fire from them as well on a regular basis...I know the limitations of each one...but Id rather carry in one of the less preferred methods than NOT CARRY AT ALL.

  16. #30
    Lead Moderator
    Array rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    15,906
    I guess smartcarry would be decent to carry, but I don\'t have room in the front to carry that way . My pistol is too large or perhaps it the type of pants I wear(jeans) don\'t have enough room . I like my 5.11 vest and IWB holsters best, followed by my pancake. No problems with fall weather and full size auto carry.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. M&P 40c methods and holsters for concealed carry
    By FeelGood in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: October 10th, 2011, 09:12 PM
  2. Different carry methods described?
    By Dean407 in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: July 17th, 2007, 02:17 PM
  3. Attn: Northern Virginia CCWs Tom Marx's Methods of Concealed Carry Presentation
    By Scott in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: September 27th, 2006, 09:24 AM
  4. concealed carry methods
    By kleinds in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: March 31st, 2006, 07:50 AM
  5. Vehicle Carry methods?
    By AKsrule in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: February 6th, 2006, 03:17 AM

Search tags for this page

conceal carry methods
,
conceal carry techniques
,

concealed carry methods

,

concealed carry techniques

,

concealed carry techniques and secrets of the pros

,
concealed carry ways
,
derringer sleeve holster
,
lowe pro. made of cordura
,
methods of concealed carry
,
naa-bb-lr
,
unconventional concealed carry
,
women concealed carry methods
Click on a term to search for related topics.