Kydex Repair

This is a discussion on Kydex Repair within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Have any of you had success in repairing cracked Kydex? I had previously brought up about how my Crossbreed Supertuck had started to crack down ...

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Thread: Kydex Repair

  1. #1
    Member Array Biomortis's Avatar
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    Kydex Repair

    Have any of you had success in repairing cracked Kydex? I had previously brought up about how my Crossbreed Supertuck had started to crack down one side and I will be returning it for service. The crack has run almost the whole length of the side now. Unfortuantely, it is my only holster and I have a Don Hume coming for my S&W 686 but its going to be quite a while and I can't afford to not carry at my store. (The Don Hume is on back order)

    I have a moldable low temp melt plastic/ceramic that is primarily used in the jewelry industry that might do the trick but was wondering if anyone else has had any success?
    Glock 22 (G2) & 27 (G3)
    S&W 686 .357 4" Stainless Pre-lock
    Ruger 10/22
    Marlin Model 65 .22LR - 1968
    Remington Model 31 16ga - 1932
    Remington 1900 12ga - 1904

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  3. #2
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    Honestly...KYDEX is really solvent resistant. I would say don't even waste your time or your $$$.
    I even tried the exact KYDEX Corp formula mixed with dissolved Kydex shavings and it was still a sub-standard crappy bond.
    I've tried Super Glue - Special Epoxy for Plastics - Model Cement - Duro Plastic Welder - Plexi-Glass cement. etc..........

    Use a piece of Duct Tape on it or order a cheapie on Ebay from a seller that can ship next day.

    Or try drilling small holes on each side of the crack and running thin, soft, brass or copper wire through the holes to hold the two sides together.

  4. #3
    Member Array Biomortis's Avatar
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    Ahhh, thanks QK. I'll probably do the binging method with wire. I'm still going to see if the stuff I have will bond to the Kydex though. I have to wait until I close though before I can get to work on it.
    Glock 22 (G2) & 27 (G3)
    S&W 686 .357 4" Stainless Pre-lock
    Ruger 10/22
    Marlin Model 65 .22LR - 1968
    Remington Model 31 16ga - 1932
    Remington 1900 12ga - 1904

  5. #4
    Member Array Biomortis's Avatar
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    It looks like I had success with my repair using the fixturing compound. Because it bonds to PVC, ABS and other polymers, I had an idea it would probably bond to the Kydex, especially since the Kydex softened when heated. The compound is called Jett Sett and its made by Contenti. Now, while its not practical for the average person to buy a can since its about $30 for a pound of it, it does have all kinds of applications for tools and crafts.

    I cleaned the crack and surrounding area in the Kydex with ethanol and then slowly heated beads of the compound on the crack and then worked it in with my fingers and metal probe. For my heat source I used the heat shrink attachment on my small Bernzomatic torch. This helped confine the heat to a dime sized area. The bond feels pretty permanent. I tried to pry an edge off with my fingernail and it held fast. It melts at about 140 degrees so its pretty easy to work with. Unfortunately its white when cool so its a little ugly but its a Supertuck so nobody sees it anyways. When hot its clear so you know exactly when to stop applying heat. Pretty cool stuff. The recommended use is to heat it in water until it melts but when using it for larger applications I just use my Wagner heat gun.

    The best part is that you can remelt it over and over again so if you don't like the way it looks you can redo the surface.
    Glock 22 (G2) & 27 (G3)
    S&W 686 .357 4" Stainless Pre-lock
    Ruger 10/22
    Marlin Model 65 .22LR - 1968
    Remington Model 31 16ga - 1932
    Remington 1900 12ga - 1904

  6. #5
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    Interesting. The white color would "X" it for most holster or knife sheath applications. Wonder if it's available in BLACK?
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    Member Array Biomortis's Avatar
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    I just did an experiment with dye and it seems successful. I have a small jar of black dye I use to color a white epoxy black when repairing clarinet bodies. A tiny dab of it folded into the melted Jett Sett turned it dark black and does not seem to have effected the structural integrity. So, I don't think the Jett Sett is white at all, its like the polar bear effect with the way it captures light and is in fact clear, it just doesn't look that way until it is molten. I have all kinds of ideas all of a sudden.....
    Glock 22 (G2) & 27 (G3)
    S&W 686 .357 4" Stainless Pre-lock
    Ruger 10/22
    Marlin Model 65 .22LR - 1968
    Remington Model 31 16ga - 1932
    Remington 1900 12ga - 1904

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    I'm going to buy some Jett Sett & play around with it. I carry the "Mad Scientist" gene in me.
    I have all sorts of dyes and colorants.
    Pure powdered Lamp Black might do the trick and would contain no possible conflicting chemicals or solvents.




    Quote Originally Posted by Biomortis View Post
    I just did an experiment with dye and it seems successful. I have a small jar of black dye I use to color a white epoxy black when repairing clarinet bodies. A tiny dab of it folded into the melted Jett Sett turned it dark black and does not seem to have effected the structural integrity. So, I don't think the Jett Sett is white at all, its like the polar bear effect with the way it captures light and is in fact clear, it just doesn't look that way until it is molten. I have all kinds of ideas all of a sudden.....
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    Member Array gigamortis's Avatar
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    I once noticed the kydex part of my SuperTuck for my 1911 starting to form a crack at the top corner. I picked up a Bondo fiberglass repair kit from Wally World and put two layers of fiberglass cloth over the outside of the whole kydex part, and one layer just inside the top opening down about 1/2". After the resin set, I trimmed the edges with a carbide burr in a die grinder for a nice, neat edge. Now, it is much stronger than it ever was. It kind of looks like carbon fiber weave on the outside now.

    Keep in mind that the strength of fiberglass comes from the fibers, not the resin. I used just enough resin to saturate the cloth and bond to the kydex. The two layers of cloth I put on the outside don't really add any noticeable thickness or weight to the kydex at all.

  10. #9
    Member Array ev239's Avatar
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    You guys do know that Crossbreed holsters have a lifetime warranty. Just send it back to them and they'll repair it or make you a new one.

    Warranty/Guarantee
    Mine: Glock 36............Wife's: Ruger SP101 3"
    -------Ruger SR9....................Ruger SR9c
    -------S&W SW99 .45.............Charter Arms Undercover

    Hidden Defense - Personal gun & holster designs/reviews.

  11. #10
    Member Array Biomortis's Avatar
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    ev239, see original message
    Glock 22 (G2) & 27 (G3)
    S&W 686 .357 4" Stainless Pre-lock
    Ruger 10/22
    Marlin Model 65 .22LR - 1968
    Remington Model 31 16ga - 1932
    Remington 1900 12ga - 1904

  12. #11
    Member Array Biomortis's Avatar
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    QKShooter, thanks for the suggestion on the lamp black, I will try that. So far, the Jett Sett is holding. No separation or cracking. This could wind up being a great solution to easily reinforce problem areas.
    Glock 22 (G2) & 27 (G3)
    S&W 686 .357 4" Stainless Pre-lock
    Ruger 10/22
    Marlin Model 65 .22LR - 1968
    Remington Model 31 16ga - 1932
    Remington 1900 12ga - 1904

  13. #12
    Member Array kaboomkaboom's Avatar
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    one could just buy a chunk of kydex off e-bay and form their own...it's very easy with a couple of pieces of foam and an oven....I've made untold kydex/leather holsters...

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