anke holster review and pics

This is a discussion on anke holster review and pics within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I purchased a Desantis Die Hard ankle holster withg the optional calf strap to use with my Glock 27 when it rides along as BUG. ...

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Thread: anke holster review and pics

  1. #1
    Member Array maddy345's Avatar
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    anke holster review and pics

    I purchased a Desantis Die Hard ankle holster withg the optional calf strap to use with my Glock 27 when it rides along as BUG.

    There isn't much to say about the holster in review other than it is very comfortable as far as ankle holsters go and holds the gun very securely. Good snap on the thumb break. The neoprene is very thick and it has some nice padding on the holster side of it.

    Not how I want to carry a primary gun but for BUG duty it will do in a pinch.





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  3. #2
    Senior Member Array highvoltage's Avatar
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    Nice. I like the way you camouflaged the left leg by pulling the material out. I would have guessed it was on that side. Unless that's how the material naturally drapes.

  4. #3
    VIP Member Array Thunder71's Avatar
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    Nice, looks a lot like my Galco from what I can see... I love ankle carry, so unobtrusive and comfortable with my Kahr's.

  5. #4
    Member Array maddy345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highvoltage View Post
    Nice. I like the way you camouflaged the left leg by pulling the material out. I would have guessed it was on that side. Unless that's how the material naturally drapes.
    That's the way it drapes. I buy my jeans slightly longer and buy the boot cut to help facilitate ankle carry.


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    Southpaw carry. Ankle holsters are comfortable. Let us know how you like it after a few weeks.

  7. #6
    Member Array maddy345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctr View Post
    Southpaw carry. Ankle holsters are comfortable. Let us know how you like it after a few weeks.
    I actually took that picture in a mirror


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  8. #7
    Member Array jasgo's Avatar
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    Have extensive experience with ankle carry (with S&W J-frames and Walther PPK/S). Looks like the holster is riding high. Does really help concealment, especially when you sit down but can impede speed of draw if you really have to pull your pant leg up a lot. I preferred my gun to ride low on the ankle as it concealed better in the hollow below the calf muscle and was faster to draw out with just one tug of the pant leg. I would wear looser pants altered a little on the longer side (but not too long) to aid concealment when sitting. Whenever preparing to sit, I'd pull down on my pants to keep it from riding up too high. Practice drawing (unloaded) with different pants (widths/lengths) until you find the easiest to draw from. I also wanted a gun/attire combo that was the fastest to draw and get on target from ankle carry so I traded off stopping power for a faster first shot. I felt it faster to deploy a slimmer/smaller gun as I could pull my pant leg up easier on a smaller gun. Just feel that speed is critical from ankle draw as you will be in a compromised position when drawing (can't move, bending down, both arms occupied) and at a time you most need to. Also might try practice drawing (unloaded) as if you got knocked down to the ground. If you have a shooting practice place that allows this, safely practice shooting from kneeling, sitting, and lying down (and also one handed). Things a lot of us ordinary CCW holders never practice. I have not for quite awhile. One other thing, try running, sprinting, and jumping with it on (unchambered, need mag full for actual weight) to really test how secure it is and how much you can do without loosing your gun.

    Just some suggestions and food for thought. Must be comforting to have that firepower on your ankle.

  9. #8
    Member Array maddy345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasgo View Post
    Have extensive experience with ankle carry (with S&W J-frames and Walther PPK/S). Looks like the holster is riding high. Does really help concealment, especially when you sit down but can impede speed of draw if you really have to pull your pant leg up a lot. I preferred my gun to ride low on the ankle as it concealed better in the hollow below the calf muscle and was faster to draw out with just one tug of the pant leg. I would wear looser pants altered a little on the longer side (but not too long) to aid concealment when sitting. Whenever preparing to sit, I'd pull down on my pants to keep it from riding up too high. Practice drawing (unloaded) with different pants (widths/lengths) until you find the easiest to draw from. I also wanted a gun/attire combo that was the fastest to draw and get on target from ankle carry so I traded off stopping power for a faster first shot. I felt it faster to deploy a slimmer/smaller gun as I could pull my pant leg up easier on a smaller gun. Just feel that speed is critical from ankle draw as you will be in a compromised position when drawing (can't move, bending down, both arms occupied) and at a time you most need to. Also might try practice drawing (unloaded) as if you got knocked down to the ground. If you have a shooting practice place that allows this, safely practice shooting from kneeling, sitting, and lying down (and also one handed). Things a lot of us ordinary CCW holders never practice. I have not for quite awhile. One other thing, try running, sprinting, and jumping with it on (unchambered, need mag full for actual weight) to really test how secure it is and how much you can do without loosing your gun.Just some suggestions and food for thought. Must be comforting to have that firepower on your ankle.
    Very good points! I do practice drawing a lot. I shoot outdoors on the "back 40" so I don't have to worry about a RO yelling at me. This isn't my primary but is a BUG for me. I practice re-holstering, dropping to one knee and drawing the BUG.


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  10. #9
    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
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    At least riding high like that keeps from bumping it on everything, as said a tad too high JMO ; )
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  11. #10
    Member Array jasgo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddy345 View Post
    Very good points! I do practice drawing a lot. I shoot outdoors on the "back 40" so I don't have to worry about a RO yelling at me. This isn't my primary but is a BUG for me. I practice re-holstering, dropping to one knee and drawing the BUG.
    Thanks. I'm jealous cause you have a private place to shoot without an RO.

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