Are thumb breaks OK? new shooter

Are thumb breaks OK? new shooter

This is a discussion on Are thumb breaks OK? new shooter within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm new to all this and was just wondering if I should get a holster with some sort of thumb break/retention or not? Thanks...

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Thread: Are thumb breaks OK? new shooter

  1. #1
    Member Array MikeyF's Avatar
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    Are thumb breaks OK? new shooter

    I'm new to all this and was just wondering if I should get a holster with some sort of thumb break/retention or not?

    Thanks


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
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    I won't say they are bad, but are totally unnecessary if carrying concealed. (with any holster of even reasonable quality)
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Array kb2wji's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum! Thats a really loaded question. I'll try to keep it short and sweet. In my opinion, yes. If you wear a holster that is outside the waistband, having some sort of active security is a good idea. A thumb break, middle finger break, snap etc... are good to have. If you carry in the waistband I dont feel it is needed. Holsters that rely strictly on friction (like a Fobus paddle for example) are far too easily compromised. I use them, but only when extremely well concealed, and on rare instances.

    Holster choice also depends very heavily on how you want to carry, and what type of gun you carry. I think the most well rounded and versatile solution for conceal carry is a simple leather pancake holster with a thumb break snap. They conceal very well and allow quick access. There are tons of them out there from the $20 eBay special up to well over $100.

    There will probably be a few mall-ninja types out there who say they can open carry with a level 1 holster all day long. Some guys think their situational awareness is so keen that they can sense a gun-grabber before the grabber even wakes up that morning. Dont be that guy. The best of us are not 100% aware 100% of the time. Some sort of level 2 holster (thumb break, finger break etc...) is not a bad idea.

    What type of gun are you looking to carry, and how do you want to carry it? Also, give us some specifics...do you need to carry while wearing a shirt and tie? In gym shorts and flip flops? I'll put it this way...my primary carry gun lives in one of 4 different holsters. No one holster is good in all situations.
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    Distinguished Member Array Elk Hunter's Avatar
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    I will not repeat all of "kb2wji" good advise, the only thing I have to add is practice. What ever you decide practice with your setup. Empty you gun and practice until it becomes natural.
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  5. #5
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    VIP Member Array sgb's Avatar
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    Thumb breaks are unnecessary on a quality made holster
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  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elk Hunter View Post
    ...the only thing I have to add is practice. What ever you decide practice with your setup. Empty you gun and practice until it becomes natural.
    I'd like to second this.

    What's more, I'd like to point out that a good instructor/school will *make* you snap and un-snap that thumb-break every time you holster/draw the weapon during training.

    There's a multitude of reasons why people choose the gear they do. I'm not you - I can't say whether what you do is right or wrong. All that I can recommend is that you choose gear based on being able to fulfill your specific needs, and that you invest in gear that's good enough to stand up to rigorous use.

    And the only thing that I can say for-sure is that you'd better know how to run your gear, when it counts.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array Kimberpackn's Avatar
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    Practice indeed. Just remember, the thumb break adds one more hurdle to clear as you try to draw your weapon under the stress of a life and death event.

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  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    my primary carry gun lives in one of 4 different holsters. No one holster is good in all situations.

    --good words and how about the other 2 or 3 guns which serve as secondary's or used when having to dress
    for different occassions?
    snap retention for a gun carried outside of a secure pocket is rather a must.
    as a bit of added security against a grab and more importantly it keeps the gun where you put it all day.
    small movements, getting in & out the car or a chair may move the gun slightly. enough slightlies and the gun may be pushed up & out of the holster.
    or you miss a step on the stairs and that jar is a big movement. or you slip and make all those funny recovery motions.
    run for the elevator or bus?

    if you can shake a gun out of a formed holster with less than 3 tries, it needs additional retention.
    sure you can tighten it more. but than the draw may be comprimised.
    thumb break snap retention costs no time in unholstering if it is made properly.
    that oval piece of metal on the inside snap acts as a stiffiner and is a must have.
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    Member Array luke213's Avatar
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    I'm personally not a fan of thumb breaks, I prefer a standard open top tightly boned holster. I wear one of that style for around 12-14 hours a day doing everything from cutting and splitting firewood, working on holsters, climbing into engine compartments, riding four wheelers etc. Lots out outdoor activity, never had an issue with retention or even a thought of loosing the gun out of the holster and I've been doing this for quite a few years without any issue. So in my opinion it's a non-issue for me and my lifestyle, there may be guys out there who do something that would require it(gymnastics maybe;) but I don't see it as an issue for most guys.

    Take care!

    Luke

  10. #10
    Member Array MikeyF's Avatar
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    Hey thanks everyone. I have a Glock30 but fell in love with my new S&W 327 snubbie. I ordered the thumb break 327 holster from Performance Center but they also had an open holster(my new gun belt hasn't arrived yet). I'll mostly need to carry with casual clothes and I'm thinking just a large button up shirt with gun on strong side hip. I'm realizing now the 327 is a fat beast and my wife's Sig238 is looking better and better

  11. #11
    Member Array luke213's Avatar
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    With a good belt/holster it really shouldn't be too much trouble to conceal that 327, though of course the P238 will be allot easier;) Generally though I've found most guys can get away with a fairly large gun comfortably with the right rig. Years ago before I got into building holsters and hadn't found the right rig for me I nearly sold my 5in. 1911 because I couldn't imagine carrying it comfortably let alone concealing it. Tried a bunch of holsters and never had any luck, now not a problem at all. It's my normal carry gun, seeing 12+ hours a day carry most days and it's still my favorite handgun to shoot and now to carry too;)

    So depending on the holster and belt you might be surprised how well it can be carried;)

    Take care!

    Luke

  12. #12
    Member Array old guy 2's Avatar
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    I too have used thumb breaks for years, when I reach for the weapon the first thing I touch is that thumb break, it is automatic.

    John
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  13. #13
    Senior Member Array kb2wji's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberpackn View Post
    Practice indeed. Just remember, the thumb break adds one more hurdle to clear as you try to draw your weapon under the stress of a life and death event.

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    If you arent used to a thumb break, yes. Once you practice with it, the hurdle is about as time and dexterity consuming as drawing a 1911 and clicking the safety off. It's one movement. If done properly (practiced), your thumb break will break as your hand is being wrapped around the grip. But yeah, if you dont practice with it, that little snap can cost you your life

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    Senior Member Array rednichols's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupcake View Post
    I won't say they are bad, but are totally unnecessary if carrying concealed. (with any holster of even reasonable quality)
    Thumbreaks have their place if you're carrying cocked-n-locked, because the outer strap crosses between the hammer and the firing pin. Sears, especially on a finely-tuned 1911, can and do slip. Wouldn't advise carrying this way without something like a thumbreak.

    Also, the thumb portion of the thumbreak forms a shield between your torso and the pistol (and even its rear sight).

    But if you've a DA pistol, then you can have the best of both worlds by selecting a holster with a slide guard (essentially the rear thumbtab but wlthout a snap in it, and the holster has no front strap). Plenty of pics/examples on this forum.
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  15. #15
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I would spend more time practicing weapon retention,a strap may slow down a grab attempt,but is not fail safe,you need to look into a course or some videos on weapon retention,and practice them with a friend/partner .
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