Don't fall into the habit of the "Rapid Holstering", especially with IWB

This is a discussion on Don't fall into the habit of the "Rapid Holstering", especially with IWB within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've seen it so many times, I'm sure most of you have. In an attempt to show their skill at presenting a handgun, someone will ...

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Thread: Don't fall into the habit of the "Rapid Holstering", especially with IWB

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    Don't fall into the habit of the "Rapid Holstering", especially with IWB

    I've seen it so many times, I'm sure most of you have. In an attempt to show their skill at presenting a handgun, someone will draw rapidly, fire the weapon, and rapidly holster the weapon. If you haven't seen it in person (and I suspect many of you have), you only need to see a few youtube videos to see what I'm talking about.

    Appendix carry, draw and holster practice - YouTube

    G26 IWB Draw, Present, Fire, holster slow drill.MPG - YouTube

    (I don't know the people in these vids, I just searched for drawing and holstering, I'm not trying to say that these people aren't knowledgeable or skilled, but just to point out how common this problem is)

    When you holster a handgun in ANY concealed carry holster holster that provides trigger coverage (not talking about competition rigs here), you are moving a piece of leather/kydex/etc within 1/8" to 1/4" of the trigger, in the direction the trigger travels to fire the weapon. All it would take is a misplaced finger, a bundle of your shirt, or a worn out holster to get caught in the trigger guard and fire the weapon. And most of us do this every day without giving it a second thought!

    Now lets take a look at how that applies to us, as people carrying a concealed weapon. Many of us choose to carry IWB, others choose OWB. One thing that many of these have in common is some type of sweat shield to separate your body and the gun. The concern here is how people tend to holster. Generally they will tip the weapon toward the sweat shield to guide the gun into the holster. Yes, its pretty easy and can be done very quickly. But what have we just done? We just pointed a LOADED GUN at our body while letting an object pass within 1/4" of our trigger! Many people won't admit it, but most people will holster this way because it feels natural. See for yourself (with a gun replica, or at least a fully unloaded weapon that you have triple checked), you'll likely be surprised that you are holsteing this way.

    Notice in the first video, about appendix carry, when he turns to your left, his right you will clearly see the weapon pointed right at his groin as he drives the handgun into the holster.

    Why do we want to holster so fast?

    I suspect that it is caused by a few things, largely the influence we have from various forms of media, between Western movies, Call of Duty, and about any movie or tv show that has a seen where the weapon is holstered (its almost always done quickly).

    Its possible that its become engrained in us because a lot of CCW training is derived from military and police training. I've done my share of rapid holstering, but it was for the purpose of transitioning from an M9 to an M4 in a thigh holster that doesn't typically cause people to flag themselves with the muzzle when holstering.

    So yes, rapid holstering does have its place, but unless you are slinging your AR and need to transition, there is simply no need for it. It is a completely unnecessary risk.


    What should we do about it?


    Train properly and safely, determine if you are prone to this problem as MOST people who carry are if they haven't specifically practiced to avoid making the mistake. Take care in holstering your handgun. Realize that a holster is not an excuse for poor weapons handling.


    Once again, these are just my opinions,

    Thanks,
    Clay
    Last edited by SHTFGearLLC; February 27th, 2013 at 08:15 AM.

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    Member Array GunsAndViolince's Avatar
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    Once the last shot has been fired and the timer has stopped, you don't get extra points for reholstering quickly.

    This came up at a training session I was at not long ago. A student was reholstering her Glock and her shirt got snagged on something either in the holster or inside the trigger guard, I couldn't see which from where I was standing. Fortunately several people quickly brought it to her attention before anything came of it.

    It's good to watch out for each other, but if someone were alone, or showing off his or her handgun to people not well-versed in safe handling procedures, could something bad happen? Yeah. How many times have we heard about someone getting shot showing off how well the safety works (or is supposed to), or forgetting to drop the mag before clearing the chamber?

    This scenario is perhaps less-likely than some of the other problems that can arise from inattentive handling of a gun, but you are right to remind people to be careful. Thanks!

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    Senior Member Array rednichols's Avatar
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    Thank you for bringing this to forum member's attention. We do talk about a covered trigger being a "necessity" for "safety"; and it does offer protection from snagging the trigger on something (i.e., an s/a trigger) or an opponent shooting you with our own pistol while struggling for it. But it creates its own hazards, such as those you've described. A real gunman can choose either covered or uncovered trigger with aplomb, because he knows his tools.

    P.S. It's not "reholstering"; that would imply that only the first "pairing" of the pistol with the holster is called "holstering", and every subsequent "draw" undoes that pairing. Instead, the procedures are "drawing" and "holstering".

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    Good point. Also serves as a reminder to pocket carriers -- always remove the holster from your pocket when "reholstering"/holstering.

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    Senior Member Array palmcoaster's Avatar
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    Amen to that.Sometimes even quick draw can have devastating consequences

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    Senior Member Array Caertaker's Avatar
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    I put my thumb on the back of my Walther PPS (over the striker indicator) when reholstering. If the trigger gets caught on something the indicator will start to rise and poke against my thumb alerting me to the impending discharge.
    walther-pps-ccw-9mm-striker-fired-pistol-cocked-indicator.jpg
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    Member Array Naufragia's Avatar
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    I typically carry my G30 in a Bianchi Professional holster. The Bianchi flattens when the sidearm is drawn, and requires two hands to re-holster. So, no "speed re-holstering" for me in any case. Still, great care is required.

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    IWB under a concealment garment doesn't at all lend itself to a quick re-holster, so it has never been an issue for me. It's not even a possibility.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
    Tuco

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    Quote Originally Posted by rednichols View Post
    Thank you for bringing this to forum member's attention. We do talk about a covered trigger being a "necessity" for "safety"; and it does offer protection from snagging the trigger on something (i.e., an s/a trigger) or an opponent shooting you with our own pistol while struggling for it. But it creates its own hazards, such as those you've described. A real gunman can choose either covered or uncovered trigger with aplomb, because he knows his tools.

    P.S. It's not "reholstering"; that would imply that only the first "pairing" of the pistol with the holster is called "holstering", and every subsequent "draw" undoes that pairing. Instead, the procedures are "drawing" and "holstering".
    Red,

    Thanks! I changed to original post to offer the correct wording.

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    VIP Member Array Ksgunner's Avatar
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    It depends on the handgun I would say, if you re-engage the manual saftey prior to holstering isn't the weapon safe? Ruger sr40c and Remington 1911 both have manual safetys so I use them.

    I know there are those folks who don't believe in manual safetys but I do. Train to sweep the saftey on the draw and re-apply when replacing the weapon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHTFGearLLC View Post
    Red,

    Thanks! I changed to original post to offer the correct wording.
    I dunno. A Google search reveals 394,000 hits on the word "reholster", and 10,500,000 hits when it is hyphenated. Language evolves, and this particular usage seems to be commonly accepted. Tomato, tomahtoe.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    I don't understand the need for a rapid re-holster at all. When is a handgun being re-holstered? When everything is over and the the reason for the gun being out is over. What's the rush? Take your time and be sure of what you are doing.

    BTW, be extra careful when holstering, or re-holstering that tomato, because those stains are very hard to remove.
    Last edited by high pockets; February 27th, 2013 at 03:29 PM.
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    VIP Member Array frankmako's Avatar
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    after you shoot, you should cover the target/bad guy. you shoot how you train. cover your traget, slow down, then holster up if all is under control.
    An armed man is a citizen. An unarmed man is a subject.

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    Member Array Danjojo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ksgunner View Post
    It depends on the handgun I would say, if you re-engage the manual saftey prior to holstering isn't the weapon safe? Ruger sr40c and Remington 1911 both have manual safetys so I use them.

    I know there are those folks who don't believe in manual safetys but I do. Train to sweep the saftey on the draw and re-apply when replacing the weapon.
    A manual safety is extra insurance, but you should always treat handling as though the safety has failed mechanically and the pistol will go off if your finger or an object pulls the trigger - just in case it has failed or did not fully engage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ksgunner View Post
    It depends on the handgun I would say, if you re-engage the manual saftey prior to holstering isn't the weapon safe? Ruger sr40c and Remington 1911 both have manual safetys so I use them.

    I know there are those folks who don't believe in manual safetys but I do. Train to sweep the saftey on the draw and re-apply when replacing the weapon.
    I suppose I'm not quite sure what you are saying. Are you saying that you feel safe holstering a weapon rapidly with a safety engaged or that you feel its safe to point a weapon at your body provided that weapon has a safety?

    Maybe neither.

    Thanks!
    Clay

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