Question about combat cut

This is a discussion on Question about combat cut within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hi all, I have a Crossbreed Supertuck, and I have been VERY happy with the quality and comfort of this holster. Lately, though, I have ...

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Thread: Question about combat cut

  1. #1
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    Question about combat cut

    Hi all,

    I have a Crossbreed Supertuck, and I have been VERY happy with the quality and comfort of this holster.

    Lately, though, I have started to become more consistent and disciplined about draw/dry-fire practice. Now that I am really focusing on the mechanics of my draw and trying to fine-tune getting a proper grip, I'm starting to think that maybe I regret not getting the combat cut option. I can really see where the extra clearance for the thumb against the body might be to my advantage.

    Before I make an irreversible modification to a holster that I like so much, I was hoping I could get some reviews from some folks here that might have tried it both ways on an IWB holster of this style. What are the tradeoffs? Do you sacrifice comfort, stability or retention with a combat cut style mod? If so, was there enough improvement in your draw to make it worth the exchange?

    Looking for any and all opinions here that might help me decide whether to do this or not.

    Thanks!
    "Freedom and discipline have come to be regarded as mutually exclusive, when in fact freedom is not at all the opposite, but the final reward of discipline" - Elisabeth Elliot

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array Taurahe's Avatar
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    I have had both and I will only get a combat cut. I have found no issues with retention or stability in any way. My preference is to have the holster cut enough that it doesnt contact the webbing of my thumb when i grip my weapon. I have a few holsters that do this and it is annoying to me.
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    Member Array ConcealedinPA's Avatar
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    There is NO comfort difference. Crossbreed says there is but there is NOT. Combat Cut ONLY
    Taurahe and TJDN like this.
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    Member Array Ndpuckhead's Avatar
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    I had a Supertuck for my old .45, and by the time I stopped trimming leather to make it comfortable and easy to draw, I ended up with what was basically a combat cut minituck. If I had to do it again, I would still get the supertuck so I could modify it the way I want. The key is to just make small adjustments at a time.
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    Member Array TJDN's Avatar
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    I use a White Hat IWB Max Tuck (or is it Super Tuck? One of them "Tucks")) with the "Combat Cut".

    It is very comfortable. No obstruction wrapping your thumb around the grip. Nice.

  7. #6
    Member Array CicadaX's Avatar
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    I cut my own and didn't notice any difference in comfort. Mark it out and do a little at a time.I trimmed mine three times before I was satisfied. Easy job!
    U.S. Navy vet
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    There definitely seems to be some consensus here. You have not only helped me decide to experiment with this, but the specific comments here have gotten me thinking on a much more fundamental and technical level about what I want to do, rather than just hacking away at this.

    I appreciate the advice. Thank you, all!
    "Freedom and discipline have come to be regarded as mutually exclusive, when in fact freedom is not at all the opposite, but the final reward of discipline" - Elisabeth Elliot

    "While they are saying, “Peace and safety!” then destruction will come upon them suddenly" 1Thess 5:3

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    Distinguished Member Array AZJD1968's Avatar
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    Yep. About 3 years ago I ordered a CBST with a combat cut and really like it and wear it everyday.
    About a year and a half ago I ordered a kholster without, and I ended up cutting it like my CBST.

    In my opinion, the combat cut is more comfortable.

    Good Luck! Let us know how it turns out.
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  10. #9
    Member Array TKshooter's Avatar
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    Combat is the way to go. When I got my crossbreed I read so much about the standard cut being more comfortable. Then I took an advanced class where I spend hours drawing from holster and my thumb was so sore from rubbing against that leather. I did my own combat cut and have since gotten all of my holsters combat cut. Wouldn't have it any other way. And as far as comfort goes- didn't notice a bit of difference, if anything less leather was more comfortable.

  11. #10
    Senior Member Array Old_Dog's Avatar
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    Real simple. Combat cut allows you to grip your gun in the holster ready to fire so when you bring it onto target you do not have to waste time adjusting your grip, wasting time and ending up with a less than perfect grip that will affect your accuracy. Juts watch youtube and see how many people adjust their grips in between shots. Between not getting a proper grip on the gun when you draw and then not getting one even after you adjust it, no matter why so many shots are fired that miss during shootouts. In my day we had out trigger guard areas cut away so that we could put our fingers on the trigger as soon as possible. We would use holster that allows us to grip the gun and trigger in the holster so that when we brought it to bear done the bad guy we were ready to fire with no wasted time.

    There is a rule of threes that goes something like this, 3 seconds to draw and shoot three bullets at someone who can reach you at 3 yards during those 3 seconds. This has been proven in a court of law. A person only needs 3 seconds to plunge a knife into your heart from 3 yards away. So that means you have to draw you gun and get off 3 shots in 3 seconds. Most people I have tested cannot even draw their gun in 3 seconds when under time pressure because even if they practice, and most do not, it has to be under stressful conditions to mean anything.

    What I a driving at is that in real gun fights you need all the time you can get because the other guy is moving at quick speed to get to you before you get to him. If you draw your gun and then spend a second rearranging your grip, you are dead. In my class the air horn would go off to indicate you died. So when you are deciding whether to get the combat cut or full cut that is a little more comfortable, just think if you would rather have a little more comfort or an extra second to use to bring your gun to bear on the bad guy trying to kill you. I learned this in many years of high level shooting competition where fractions of a second could win or lose a competition over 5 stages. I learned to be efficient in my draw and shooting. There is so much so many do not know that they need to know besides shooting good. Shooting moving targets is fun to watch the first time as most do no hit them the same way they would not hit a moving bad guy who tend to not stand still with red target stripes on his chest. Engaging multiple targets is also a skill to be learned. You learn to move your eyes to the next target and then your gun. If you use your gun first as most do, you often will overshoot the target and miss or waste time to get back on target if you are still alive. So with so many other things that take time I would say that a holster that allows you to get a proper combat grip on your gun is important as it not only save you time but starts you off in a position to win. If you start behind from the draw you will be playing catch up and that is never good. As was drilled into me, first to hit, first to win. When adrenaline is coursing through your body like nothing you even could imagine, you want a firm grip on your gun as it leaves your holster. That sets you up for everything else. If you have to readjust your grip you are not wasting time not only doing it but also thinking about it and it will slow you down and may even screw up the rest of your steps to get on target fast and shoot. BTW, practice point shooting with one hand because despite what you practice at the range that is what most people will do in a real gun fight. Just watch some videos of store robberies about how it really goes. People hiding behind things and sticking their guns above their cover and shooting blindly or other crazy things. As I keep saying, you mental picture of your gun fight is nothing like it will really be. No one imagines that they will soil their pants and yet it happens more times than you think. Heck, many times guns jam from limpwristing due to the stress. or just cheap guns and ammo. Most do not practice the tap, rack, bang drill so that is automatic and instead stare at their guns to figure out how to clear it. Heaven forbid they have to drop they mag to clear the jab because do not carry spare mags thinking that they are only for when you need more bullets and never thinking about having to drop one to clear a jam or having one go bad. All competition shooters have boxes of bad mags that we only use for the range. Experience and training will count a lot more in a civilian encounter than just being a good range shooter. Yet 99% will never take a training lesson even though they are fun and give you confidence and new skills to use. You cannot train for every possibility but you can learn to understand which of the skills you do know are best applied to the situation at hand. The combatant that best figures out how to adapt their skills to the fight will win.

    So yes get a combat cut because every second counts and you do not want to take your first shot with a bad grip as it could be your last shot. :)
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  12. #11
    Member Array JoeyG's Avatar
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    I got mine with full coverage and wore it a few weeks to allow it to mold to my body shape. Then, I cut my holster by tracing around my gun as a guide. As others have stated, I made small cuts until I was satisfied. It's also nice to sand the cuts once you have your holster where you want it. A dremel works well if you have one. I am very satisfied with the finished product.

  13. #12
    Senior Member Array palmcoaster's Avatar
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    what is your edc? I opted for No combat cut due to the extended mag release on my G27,combat cut lets me feel it in my back.

  14. #13
    Member Array Tzed250's Avatar
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    I carry IWB with a combat cut. I like the feel of the grip against my body. It lets me know exactly where the pistol is at all times. If I'm ever bothered by it I think back to what Jeff Cooper said. Carrying a gun is to be comforting, not comfortable.


    ACE-1 by zweitakt250, on Flickr


    ACE-1 by zweitakt250, on Flickr

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    Thanks again, all.

    Good info there for me to chew on, old dog. I have considered many of these things, and am taking steps to give myself more advantage should the need arise.

    Palmcoaster, I am carrying a SA XD9SC. I think the mag release will not be a problem for carrying. It's just a little short button. I just have to make sure that whatever way I cut my holster doesn't guide my thumb to be on the mag release when I draw. That would be bad.

    Thanks for the pics, Tzed250.
    "Freedom and discipline have come to be regarded as mutually exclusive, when in fact freedom is not at all the opposite, but the final reward of discipline" - Elisabeth Elliot

    "While they are saying, “Peace and safety!” then destruction will come upon them suddenly" 1Thess 5:3

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