Old Faithful Holster -- Setting t-nuts

This is a discussion on Old Faithful Holster -- Setting t-nuts within the Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I recently acquired an Old Faithful holster, but I've run into a dead end. No matter what I do I can't get the t-nuts properly ...

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Thread: Old Faithful Holster -- Setting t-nuts

  1. #1
    New Member Array a333's Avatar
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    Old Faithful Holster -- Setting t-nuts

    I recently acquired an Old Faithful holster, but I've run into a dead end. No matter what I do I can't get the t-nuts properly set into the leather. I've followed the video instructions, keeping the extra piece of leather underneath and hitting it as hard as I can with a hammer, but it's just not happening. I've even tried pushing them down under the weight of my bed frame and still nothing. The t-nuts will embed only about halfway and fall out easily -- it's like playing whack-a-mole, I get one in and as soon as I try hammering in another one, the first one pops out.

    Does anyone else have experience with this problem? The leather around the holes is perforated now from the spikes and I'm starting to worry that it will be impossible to get them to stick even if I do figure out how to get them in all the way.
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    Senior Member Array rednichols's Avatar
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    Get a steel hex nut, large enough to match the diameter of the teenut (not the barrel of the teenut; the flange itself). Put the nut on the concrete floor of your garage, put the holster over the nut with the teenut inserted into the leather so that the barrel of it can come through into the hole in the steel nut. Hit the back of the teenut with a steel hammer, hard. The teenut barbs, if you haven't bent them sideways already, will pierce the leather and bend over against the hex nut. If indeed you already have bent the teenut barbs over to one side, use a pair of pliers to straighten them before using the steel hex nut method.
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    Member Array Enzo411's Avatar
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    I've bought all four of my Old Faithful holsters already assembled but if you did bend or break a piece call Old Fsithful and I'm sure they'll send you replacements. IMO, a great company.
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    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    I ran into the same issue but they accidentally sent me a second holster fully assembled (they let me keep it ) so i haven't assembled the other one. I've been avoiding it because it was so frustrating. lol I like Red's tip, though. I'll have to give that a try.
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    I had the same problem, but when I put the screws in, the torque I put on the screws seated the t nuts pretty well.
    Mike1956 likes this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by StripesDude View Post
    I had the same problem, but when I put the screws in, the torque I put on the screws seated the t nuts pretty well.
    That is how I seat barbed T-nuts, and have never had a problem.
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    Member Array Compa49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StripesDude View Post
    I had the same problem, but when I put the screws in, the torque I put on the screws seated the t nuts pretty well.
    I too had some difficulty setting the t-nuts. But once I put on the screws and tightened them down the t-nuts sank into the leather. Never had a problem after. Just make sure you put a little loctite on the screws to keep them from backing out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Compa49 View Post
    I too had some difficulty setting the t-nuts. But once I put on the screws and tightened them down the t-nuts sank into the leather. Never had a problem after. Just make sure you put a little loctite on the screws to keep them from backing out.
    But make sure you have it set exactly as you want it before applying the loctite.
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    That is a common problem with T-nuts on hybrid holsters. Some leather is dense enough that it is almost impossible to set a T-nut without bending the prongs. That is why we didn't use them for the first 2 years of operation. We started using them when we built the equipment to cut the T-nut slits for all of the holes. This allows for adjustment without any tools in just a few seconds, and also ensures that the leather doesn't get damaged around the hole.
    uploadfromtaptalk1397573457350.jpg

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    I prefer stitched leather holsters. No Chicago screws or tee-nuts for me!
    Just old school preference here.
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  12. #11
    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
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    Use the screws and clips to pull them in. The T nuts are designed for wood, which is tough and not too flexible. The leather is flexible and wants to bounce back unless you apply constant pressure. Trying to set both and then put the clips on is most likely and excursus in frustration. I seat mine by hand and finish with the screw and clip. One at a time.
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  13. #12
    Member Array Rabbit212's Avatar
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    Chicago screws replaced all the t nuts. No hammering no fuss and on the clips I dont have to install all of the t nuts when making ride/cant adjustments just move them from hole to hole.
    Those are my principles, and if you don't like them.....well, I have others.

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