Defending against the low line power stab - Page 5

Defending against the low line power stab

This is a discussion on Defending against the low line power stab within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I have seen full speed practice 'work' where the defender grabs the knife wielder's forearm with both hands and then works from that position. But ...

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 83

Thread: Defending against the low line power stab

  1. #61
    Member Array HerbM's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    42
    I have seen full speed practice 'work' where the defender grabs the knife wielder's forearm with both hands and then works from that position.

    But against a knowledgeable attacker one must be extremely vigilant against the attacker just switching the knife to the other hand.

    And a strong attacker will start flailing that arm around unless you are able to control it and advance the position -- just hanging one works for a limited time at best and psychologically once you have that "hold" it is so tempting to just hang on.

    And you are correct: The issue with the BJJ stuff is both the knife and multiple attackers.

    Almost by definition "your mugger" (who picks you) will KNOW in his heart that he not only will beat you but will do so WITHOUT injury. While a mugger can be wrong, they MUST be correct a very high percentage of the time or they will end up dead, in jail, or injurred -- at best they go home without their drugs, dinner, etc if they don't "win".

    So if "your mugger" is easy to beat then chances are he is about to produce a weapon or his friends are about to land on your back.

    He arranges the odds to be vastly in his favor and no matter how armed or how skillful we are we must prepare for those overwhelming odds.

    --
    HerbM
    Keep fighting -- God will tell you when you are dead.
    Last edited by HerbM; June 2nd, 2010 at 08:46 AM.


  2. #62
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas, in the RGV
    Posts
    747
    One thing that the BJJ does have going for it, however, is that base disruption is FTW. I don't care how good you are with a knife, if I jam your strike, step outside and back and dump you flat on your back as I start my runner, you ain't getting me with that knife. Yes, you can fairly easily get caught up in task fixation if you grab someone's arm, but if you train to block, grab, dump, and go you'll end up doing just fine much more often than not.

    Also, don't forget that BJJ has strikes in it. Everyone seems to think that it's 100% about rolling with someone on the ground and going for chokes/submissions. Not the case, my friends. In the words of Rickson Gracie, "Attain your base, remove their base, finish them off." He doesn't say anywhere that it has to be by choke or submission.

  3. #63
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,319
    But against a knowledgeable attacker one must be extremely vigilant against the attacker just switching the knife to the other hand.
    The issue is most people do not know "What do I do next" the grabbing of the knife hand should at the most be a transitional move, you should not give them time to register or even switch knife hands, once you have control of that knife hand do SOMETHING with it, and do it FAST, otherwise you are now in a knife struggle...which is not a nice place to me. keep that right hand away from the left hand, and keep your body away from that left hand as well (you don't want to be hit while struggling)

    Pull that knife arm away from their body and keep them of balance, try and force their grip to open by bending their wrist inward.
    Glock 19
    Kahr PM9
    LMT-M4
    Mossberg 590
    Shodan, Jujutsu

  4. #64
    Member Array HerbM's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post
    One thing that the BJJ does have going for it, however, is that base disruption is FTW. I don't care how good you are with a knife, if I jam your strike, step outside and back and dump you flat on your back as I start my runner, you ain't getting me with that knife. Yes, you can fairly easily get caught up in task fixation if you grab someone's arm, but if you train to block, grab, dump, and go you'll end up doing just fine much more often than not.

    Also, don't forget that BJJ has strikes in it. Everyone seems to think that it's 100% about rolling with someone on the ground and going for chokes/submissions. Not the case, my friends. In the words of Rickson Gracie, "Attain your base, remove their base, finish them off." He doesn't say anywhere that it has to be by choke or submission.
    I like BJJ, I do BJJ, and I use BJJ with knife defense and attack where appropriate, but BJJ alone is highly deficient against a typical street knife attack -- and partially for many of the same reasons that BJJ is so good at one on one street defense against an unarmed assailant:

    BJJ doesn't practice (very often) defense against (or using) a knife, especially against a fully committed and fully resisting partner/opponent at full speed.

    A big part of the value of BJJ is that it practice against (an unarmed single) opponent at full speed during EVERY SINGLE practice. This is why BJJ typically far exceeds the traditional jiu-jutsu, judo, or most arts when applied in the street againt a typical (single, unarmed attacker.)

    Of course, IF you can block and throw the attacker (using BJJ or anything else) and then run you are good.

    But that is like saying, "If my technique XYZ works, then it works." Duh!

    Try it against someone who WANTS to 'cut' you using a safe knife like the Nok trainer. You are almost certainly going to be VERY DISAPPOINTED in your defense whether it is BJJ or almost any art or technique unless you have specifically been practicing it at full speed against fully resisting opponents.

    Sorry, we see this over and over when martial artists come to AMOK! (or other knife based full speed) training.

    I saw it myself when first exposed to AMOK! -- almost nothing we were taught actually works under those conditions UNTIL you learn to deal with that stupid knife which is all over the place when you attacker is not cooperating and you cannot specify either the type nor even the TIME of the attack.

    [For BJJ folks who doubt this, merely recall how shocked the world was at when a normal size BJJ -- Royce Gracie -- player kept defeating MUCH bigger people with pretty much any single art training you care to name. Why? He had been going full speed against uncooperative opponents using techniques the MA world just didn't understand.]

    In knife defense, it is NOT enough to "win" -- you want to go home safe, not the the ER or to the morgue.

    Really, this is not a challenge (in the sense of 'mine is better') but the experience of a lot of really smart people with a lot of MA (including BJJ) people.

    Anyone who can do better reliably with simple techniques PLEASE SHOW ME HOW -- because I want to learn.

    The best single technique (set) that I have seen remains the "Pekiti Fence* to the Dog Catcher" developed by Marc Denny (and Gabe Suarez) -- and which I tried to describe earlier.

    *I omitted the Pekiti Fence from the description since it is NOT essential to the Dog Catcher even though it is very helpful IF you have the time and space to do it as well.

    There is also the simple fact that if you have time & space to start with the Fence then likely you can draw your own weapon or run without engaging.

    Really -- go try everything against uncooperative opponents at full speed.


    --
    HerbM

  5. #65
    Member Array HerbM's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    The issue is most people do not know "What do I do next" the grabbing of the knife hand should at the most be a transitional move, you should not give them time to register or even switch knife hands, once you have control of that knife hand do SOMETHING with it, and do it FAST, otherwise you are now in a knife struggle...which is not a nice place to me. keep that right hand away from the left hand, and keep your body away from that left hand as well (you don't want to be hit while struggling)

    Pull that knife arm away from their body and keep them of balance, try and force their grip to open by bending their wrist inward.
    Yes, that is precisely correct.

    Much of the time, when we do grab the arm (and work correctly but don't succeed in advancing the position) we end up having to let go and returning to that original position:

    He's got a knife and I am a few feet away trying to defend against his attack.

    Which sucks!

    I already ran the gauntlet to get control of that arm and knife and now I have to do it AGAIN.

    And in case no one has mentioned it yet: Most disarms DO NOT WORK!

    (And yes, we both practice and teach disarms.)

    Disarms typically don't work reliably when you "reach for them" but can be useful additions when you know them well enough to "see them go by" -- you do them when the opportunity presents, not on command or from a set attack which depends partly on a cooperative partner.

    You can learn to make disarms work, but it isn't like most of the martial arts taught us.

  6. #66
    Member Array HerbM's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    42
    I forgot to mention relative to BJJ:

    BJJ does indeed have strikes.

    BJJ teaches strikes as part of the street fighting, combatives, or no rules types of practice.

    However, empty hand strikes are ALMOST WORTHLESS against a minimally knowledgeable knife attacker.

    You are already cut pretty severely if you don't stop that knife attack first.

    Strikes have their place in knife defense (I box almost every day), but it isn't while that knife is all over the place in your face & body & arms.

    You must stop the initial attack, get position and/or control, then move (rapidly) to locking, throwing, striking or whatever other martial skills you have.

    Criminals don't usually announce their attack -- they work to get close with social engineering (e.g., "Can you spare some change?" or "Can you tell me how to get to the Interstate?") or by ambush, and then they UNLEASH surprise attacks.

    You can, of course, avoid many attacks (probably most) with situational awareness (and even de-escalation techniques) but the martial side of our training is about what to do when we MISS those cues and the attack is RIGHT THERE, RIGHT NOW despite our best efforts.

    After all, that's why most people on this forum (DefensiveCARRY) go to the trouble of carrying a firearm, knife, or other defensive tools.

    IF you cannot ACCESS those tools when the attack is ALREADY underway then you are likely giving up the vast majority of benefit from those tools.

    Accessing (which includes deflecting initial surprise attacks) is the most important (physical) skill.

    If you survive the initial attack, then successfully ACCESS, and DEPLOY a weapon (or other tool) many/most criminals will break off their attack -- suddenly remembering they need to be somewhere else....

    Practically no criminal wants a fair fight (e.g., your knife against his from an even start) and none of them want to face you if your pistol or other tool gives you significant advantage.

  7. #67
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,319
    you're going to get cut and stabbed more than once more than likely...but the goal in defending against a knife is to LIVE, not to try and come out clean
    Glock 19
    Kahr PM9
    LMT-M4
    Mossberg 590
    Shodan, Jujutsu

  8. #68
    Member Array HerbM's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    you're going to get cut and stabbed more than once more than likely...but the goal in defending against a knife is to LIVE, not to try and come out clean
    True to a certain extent: The most important goal is to LIVE. To go home with your loved ones.

    But very important secondary goals are to avoid severe injury and ideally to avoid any significant injury at all.

    My goals include NOT having an extensive hospital stay nor having to undergo major surgery, while avoiding loss of function (e.g., losing fingers, a kidney, part of my liver, an eye, disfiguring scars on my face.)

    All are better than death, but avoiding injury if possible IS PART of my overall goal right behind LIVING.

    There also tactical reasons for avoiding even superficial damage to your hands or arms -- once you are debilitated the likelihood of your survival goes down with each such wound.

    Given a severe enough wound or enough of them you go on a clock for bleeding out -- you must get to medical treatment before you DIE.

    Once wounded even if you run, your wounds are going to leave a blood trail which may be tracked by the predator(s) which originated the attack....

    So, it is true that living is the ULTIMATE most important goal, but it is insufficient as a plan and especially as a training goal.

  9. #69
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas, in the RGV
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by HerbM View Post
    However, empty hand strikes are ALMOST WORTHLESS against a minimally knowledgeable knife attacker.

    You are already cut pretty severely if you don't stop that knife attack first.

    Strikes have their place in knife defense (I box almost every day), but it isn't while that knife is all over the place in your face & body & arms.

    You must stop the initial attack, get position and/or control, then move (rapidly) to locking, throwing, striking or whatever other martial skills you have.

    Criminals don't usually announce their attack -- they work to get close with social engineering (e.g., "Can you spare some change?" or "Can you tell me how to get to the Interstate?") or by ambush, and then they UNLEASH surprise attacks.

    IF you cannot ACCESS those tools when the attack is ALREADY underway then you are likely giving up the vast majority of benefit from those tools.

    Accessing (which includes deflecting initial surprise attacks) is the most important (physical) skill.

    If you survive the initial attack, then successfully ACCESS, and DEPLOY a weapon (or other tool) many/most criminals will break off their attack -- suddenly remembering they need to be somewhere else....
    #1: Complete disagreement here. Having a knife changes nothing about the effectiveness of an unarmed attack the same as a sword, axe, or other weapon doesn't change the effectiveness of an unarmed attack. If you can get in and get a good hit, it doesn't matter what weapon they have in their hand.

    #2: Every knife attack isn't automatically a fight winner, just as every punch, kick, choke, or submission attempt is a fight winner. Too many variables to even come close to reasonably making a blanket statement such as this.

    #3: Evade or deflect and then strike. The same with a unarmed attack, a baseball bat, a katana, or a halberd.

    #4: Complete agreement here.

    #5: Agree here as well, but unnecessary capitalization doesn't make your point any more valid.

    #6: Agreement here as well.

    #7: I believe you're close to my opinion, but I feel that the initial deflection is much more important than accessing your tools. There are very few criminal assault situations that can be fixed with stopping your attacks to access a knife or gun that can't also be handled by an effective knee to the head. The focus should be on effective technique and reading of the situation as it is currently, not rote evasion/position/access at the expense of something that is already proving effective.

    #8: Complete agreement here. They picked you because you seemed easy prey, not because it was obvious that you'll be a handful.

  10. #70
    Member Array HerbM's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post
    #1: Complete disagreement here. Having a knife changes nothing about the effectiveness of an unarmed attack the same as a sword, axe, or other weapon doesn't change the effectiveness of an unarmed attack. If you can get in and get a good hit, it doesn't matter what weapon they have in their hand.
    That is either demonstrably wrong -- and trivially so -- or you have not clearly stated what you mean:

    Working against a knife frequently does change the effectiveness of an unarmed attack (defense?) against the holder of that knife.

    There are so many martial artists who think that "hitting" someone 'works' -- boxers prove this wrong every time they enter the ring. Generally many hits are required. Sure you might get lucky with a one hit knockout or find a critical point (e.g., throat, groin), but even those vulnerable points are MUCH HARDER to hit with enough force to STOP a determined opponent.

    If you merely brush a knife you may end up seriously injuring yourself of course, but even a slight wound can cause you to break off your 'technique' -- it is much like touching a hot stove to bring YOUR FLESH up against the working edge of the knife.

    Stabbing your own hand onto the point is a serious issue.

    In boxing, I can take a LOT of hits IF I can get inside and knock out my opponent -- I will likely recover fully within moments even if those hits do some damage less than a knockout to me.

    The same types of 'hits' by a knife can permanently damage or even kill me (some time later).

    For that matter when unarmed against an unarmed assailant we won't even count 'hits to my hands and arms' most of the time. You cannot do that when facing an edged weapon.

    This is one of the reasons that facing a knife CAN (sometimes, not always) be worse even than facing a firearm. Once I am within the "muzzle radius" of an assailants firearm I am at least temporarily 'safe' from that weapon -- not true of a knife where merely grabbing it to perform the disarm can give me a serious cut -- perhaps even debilitating or permanent.

    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post
    #2: Every knife attack isn't automatically a fight winner, just as every punch, kick, choke, or submission attempt is a fight winner. Too many variables to even come close to reasonably making a blanket statement such as this.
    No, of course not.

    But even small knife 'hits' can both lead to your assailant overcoming your defenses or permanent injury. (E.g., loss of fingers, loss of functionality, blindness, or even bleeding out eventually.)

    I do NOT want to get cut during a defense.


    Most people cannot even continue to press their defense if they are getting cut, and even those of us who have done so in the past cannot be sure we will be able to do so against some future (probably different) set of wounds being delivered by a knife wielder.

    Sure, I can train to do so -- and I even use a signature that reminds us to do this -- but even my past success doesn't mean it will work next time.

    Getting CUT during a fight changes your BRAIN -- and usually not for the better.

    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post

    #3: Evade or deflect and then strike. The same with a unarmed attack, a baseball bat, a katana, or a halberd.
    Ok, when it works (really.)

    But evading a knife wielder is HARD -- if you don't recognize how hard it is then I must ask how often you have worked against a young, strong, athletic, NON-COOPERATIVE knife opponent who is fully commited to the attack....

    We do this during every practice and it is HARD to do with the BEST techniques.

    And by the way, the "Best" is defined as those which first allow us to avoid killing strikes, then body/head strikes, then wounds of other types.


    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post



    #7: I believe you're close to my opinion, but I feel that the initial deflection is much more important than accessing your tools. There are very few criminal assault situations that can be fixed with stopping your attacks to access a knife or gun that can't also be handled by an effective knee to the head. The focus should be on effective technique and reading of the situation as it is currently, not rote evasion/position/access at the expense of something that is already proving effective.
    I must have been unclear: We consider STOPPING the initial attack to be part of the chain that is Accessing, not some separate idea.

    One the other hand, once I have STOPPED that attack I will generally prefer to draw my firearm than to continue to counter-attack with my empty hands.

    Not a firm rule, e.g., I might have disarmed the assailant and have his weapon now, but even then I will likely change to my known, tested, practice weapon rather than continue to use his.

    IF you have the distance, then a firearm is demonstrably a safer choice for defense.

    Most of my earlier comments about stopping the initial attack referred though to the issue that many people do think (incorrectly) that they can draw their firearm (knife etc) while under hard assault. Generally that doesn't work.



    Quote Originally Posted by psychophipps View Post

    #8: Complete agreement here. They picked you because you seemed easy prey, not because it was obvious that you'll be a handful.
    Right.

    The above is of course almost a truism, but I find it reminds people (who definitely need reminding) that defending against a criminal attack is going to be a lot harder (on average) than they were trained to believe.

    Heck, even firearms fail to stop determined attackers far more often than TV and movies would lead us to believe, all the way up to and including a center of mass through and through with a 12 gauge shotgun (there is at least one case of the criminal continuing to fight, escaping, and ultimately living.)

    On the other hand, another advantage of "Accessing" is however that many criminals will break off their attack as soon as you do this.

    If the criminal sees my knife or gun and "runs off" that is also a "win" for me --- I am required to neither arrest nor punish the criminal.

    My goal is to survive with the least amount of loss: physical, legal, monetary, psychological, time, etc.

    --
    HerbM
    Keep fighting -- God will tell you when you are dead.

  11. #71
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,319
    If you can get in and get a good hit, it doesn't matter what weapon they have in their hand.
    However, the reach and speed of the weapon will determine HOW you get in.
    Glock 19
    Kahr PM9
    LMT-M4
    Mossberg 590
    Shodan, Jujutsu

  12. #72
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas, in the RGV
    Posts
    747
    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    However, the reach and speed of the weapon will determine HOW you get in.
    So what about a 3-4 inch folder makes it so hard to get in?

  13. #73
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas, in the RGV
    Posts
    747
    I find boxing to be a horrible example, actually. Not because of the gloves, which are well known to be for the protection of the puncher much more than the punchee, but because you don't see a whole lot of all-out effort in boxing. If a boxer threw every single punch as hard as they possibly could then they wouldn't have any gas left in case the fight drags out passed the first couple of rounds. Then you add that boxing has some good stuff, but there are people from other systems that can certainly hit with better targeting and power let alone being able to do things much "dirtier".

    It has been my experience in training that it's not really all that hard to defend from a knife from an untrained user. They telegraph badly, have horrible footwork, don't know their ranges correctly, stab with a fully-extended stiff-arm, and hack with the knife like a lumberjack rather than using the short chopping motions they should use. Slashes are hammerfists and knife hands, thrusts are ridge-hands, jabs, and reverse punches, etc. Pretty simple if you can get passed the massive adrenaline and mindnumbing panic. I've been lucky, myself, but I don't see where your typical thug is going to be all that much better with a blade than the guy who's knife I kicked from his hand the one time I had to worry about it.

    SouthNarc recently put up a post on another forum about this. He mentioned (paraphrased) that in his research the vast majority of knife stops are psychological. He went on and mentioned that, in his opinion (paraphrased), a short-bladed knife is about the worst weapon he can think of for effectively stopping anyone who is really intent on doing the deed. He furthermore went on to say (paraphased) that he really doesn't suggest the folding knife as a primary weapon because a weapon that relies upon an adversary's willingness to quit (italicized not paraphrased) to be effective isn't much of a weapon when it comes right down to it.

    Martial artists are less than 5% of the population in the US, and that counts the people who did TKD for a month after they saw Ninja Turtles/Power Rangers on TV when they were kids. Combatives people are less than 1% of those people. FMA/Silat might be a combined 2-3% of the rest. When you see the real stats of knife attacks it quickly becomes apparent that they are typically between two untrained individuals (except for maybe a few bunk-side pointers while in various joints), one has surprise and a weapon, and the other is overcome by the raw shock of the situation and has no bloody clue at all about how to handle the extremely violent, armed individual that they now face.

    And the victims still survive much more often than not...
    Last edited by psychophipps; June 2nd, 2010 at 10:17 PM. Reason: clarification and corrections

  14. #74
    Member Array Cruel Hand Luke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    404
    This really picked up since the last time I checked in on this thread.....

    With regards to strikes not being effective....we need to make sure we are talking about the same thing here. A little "defining of terms" if you will.

    Are we talking about an adrenalized focused committed attacker whose only purpose in life is to kill you or die trying?

    Are we talking about someone who, within in the criminal assault paradigm, is just looking for a payday and not wanting to get hurt doing it?

    Are we talking about someone we will have to KILL to stop them or are we talking about someone who can be convinced (through force) that they will give up?

    You see these are DRASTICLY different opponenets to face. One is an attacking great white shark with its eyes rolled back in its head and the other is a bottom feeder who is looking to capitalize on someone who is not paying attention.

    The first guy? Well he may not get the hint even if you hit him as hard as you can . The second guy? He may get knocked out by a blow that wouldn't even register to the first guy.

    And WHERE you hit him may have as much an effect as how hard. I've never seen anyone in a boxing match fall victim to a chopping brachial stun. I HAVE however knocked a guy out with one in real life though. An edge of hand blow or a forearm swung like a metal pipe into the juncture between neck and shoulder is what I'm referring to if anyone is not familiar with what I'm talking about. So we cannot draw conclusions of what is possible from what we see or experience in a boxing match because it is not the same as the real thing.I'm not suggesting that is "THE TECHNIQUE" to use I'm merely saying you do not see it in boxing...but I know it works. While the match shows us some interesting things, it is not the same as the real world street confrontation.There are a couple of reasons for this. Rules of the match and the fact that you both know there is a fight about to happen in the match. On the street he may not expect any real resistance...and that can be a HUGE advantage for us.

    One reason things work in the real world that may not work in the cage or the ring is the attacker may not be expecting resistance. If he doesn't...and you do hit him by surprise you may completely change the dynamics of the interaction with one blow.

    Just like a finger in the eye, a head butt (though we do see that in boxing occasionally) or a shot to the testicles (either a punch or a knee) some things are illegal in boxing so we do not see what effect they really have. Also slamming someone to the ground or hyper extending/breaking their elbow normally gets pretty good results too. Think using Judo with extremely bad intent.

    These are all things that CAN stop a fight quickly....BUT it is all depending on the chemical, emotional and physical condition of the attacker. So there is no sure thing. No matter what you do you MAY get killed. But fortunately unless they hit an artery or jugular you will not likely die from a slash. So if you get cut you are probably not dead....but if you give up and they stab you a bunch in important places you will be.... so keep fighting! Don't give up.

    Now, OBVIOUSLY we have to use our hands to keep from getting skewered with the initial attack and then control the limb that is holding the knife and either make appropriate distance between us (use their momentum to shove them off or trip them to the ground and run away from them) so we can access our own weapon or maintain physical control of the knife bearing limb long enough to hit them with something that changes their channel or take them to the ground and start destroying elbow and shoulder joints.

    Standing there toe to toe with them exchanging punches for stabs like "Rock'em Sock'em Robots" is not going to go well for you, but once you gain control of the weapon bearing limb things suddenly get easier to deal with ....but ONLY IF you VIOLENTLY counterattack with no other thought than to destroy them. If you go into this worried about the outcome you will not fight the same as you will if YOU are the great white with its eyes rolled back in its head.

    Nothing is a sure thing....except that if you just stand there you'll get stabbed...and when you give up and stop fighting you will probably then get stabbed enough to kill you.
    Randy Harris
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor
    NRA Certified Instructor
    Master Class IDPA SSP

    TRAIN with me....http://www.suarezinternationalstore....px?find=harris

  15. #75
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    2,147
    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    you're going to get cut and stabbed more than once more than likely...but the goal in defending against a knife is to LIVE, not to try and come out clean
    In a knife fight winners bleed, losers gush.
    Chris Upchurch - Suarez International Staff Instructor
    Upcoming SI Classes in South Carolina:
    Close Range Gunfighting - March 17-18
    Zero to Five Feet Gunfighting - April 14-15

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. 1st 'Stab-Proof' Knife introduced in UK
    By tinkerinWstuff in forum Defensive Knives & Other Weapons
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: June 22nd, 2009, 08:45 AM
  2. MCS Video Clip...Principle Based Response for low line stab
    By mercop in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 27th, 2008, 05:48 PM
  3. [UGLY] Take A Shower or Stab Somebody To Death.
    By QKShooter in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: June 29th, 2008, 08:23 PM
  4. Stab Proof School Uniforms On Sale
    By Miggy in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: August 15th, 2007, 11:20 AM

Search tags for this page

janich southnarc
,
low line knife attack
,

mercop southnarc

,

michael janich x block against knife stab

,
nok training knife/fma
,

silat footwork balance disruption

,
southnarc carry techniques
,
southnarc hac
,
southnarc palm strike techniques
,
southnarc pistol flashlight
,
the dogcatcher knife technique disarm
,

tom sotis

Click on a term to search for related topics.