All the sudden Im deaf, but for good reason. - Page 2

All the sudden Im deaf, but for good reason.

This is a discussion on All the sudden Im deaf, but for good reason. within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Huh? what? say again. I can't hear a word you're sayin! speak up! I would hate to have to use those terms as a result ...

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  1. #16
    Member Array EPIC SCUMBAG's Avatar
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    Huh? what? say again. I can't hear a word you're sayin! speak up! I would hate to have to use those terms as a result of hearing loss. Did you just say "back the truck up?"


  2. #17
    Member Array Sgt Z Squad's Avatar
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    I would encourage you to get Dave Grossman's book "On Combat." He chronicles the physiological and psychological responses of the human body in critical incidents. One of these responses is auditory blunting reported by a large number of persons in gunfights for their life. The body does have defense mechanisms. Use the hearing protection.
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  3. #18
    Distinguished Member Array pinklady's Avatar
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    Well I have thought about this alot. My ears are highly sensative to noise, so I may have to have to tell the BG to wait while I put my ear protection on.

  4. #19
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    HotGuns beat me to it. Auditory exclusion will come into play in the event of a SD type shooting. When a hunter experiences buck fever the same thing happens, he does not hear the shot it is a natural body defense.
    As far as practicing without hearing protection just to get used to the noise it doesnt work like that. Exposure to gunfire may take a gradual toll on your hearing or do severe damange the first time around depending on the person.
    You may also end up with tinitis (sp) which is a constant or semi constant ringing in the ears due to prolonged exposure to gunfire or loud noises.
    As far as exposing yourself or others to the effects of muzzle blast and loud noise I would not do it more than once if that it may do more harm than good if it causes damage to your or their hearing or makes them afraid of the weapon.
    "A first rate man with a third rate gun is far better than the other way around". The gun is a tool, you are the craftsman that makes it work. There are those who say "if I had to do it, I could" yet they never go out and train to do it. Don't let stupid be your mindset. Harryball 2013

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    You shoot without hearing protection and you could very well lose enough hearing that you wouldn't hear a crook walking thru your house
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  6. #21
    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    When you get in the freakout mode, and you have to draw and fire, you will have an adrenaline rush. "auditory exclusion" is but one of many things that you will experience. In others words, you wont remember hearing much at all.

    Its the very reason that people that shoot in self defense may recall shooting only once or twice, when in fact that have dumped every shot in the magazine.

    It one of the ways that the body protects itself.

    You dont have that advantage when you are just out plinking or shooting at targets on the range. Hearing protection should always be worn. IF you have to shoot in self defense...then do what you gotta do...
    What he said.

    DO NOT practice without hearing protection...you don't want to damage something that can't be fixed.
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  7. #22
    Member Array TheoryRealm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacman605 View Post
    HotGuns beat me to it. Auditory exclusion will come into play in the event of a SD type shooting. When a hunter experiences buck fever the same thing happens, he does not hear the shot it is a natural body defense.
    As far as practicing without hearing protection just to get used to the noise it doesnt work like that. Exposure to gunfire may take a gradual toll on your hearing or do severe damange the first time around depending on the person.
    You may also end up with tinitis (sp) which is a constant or semi constant ringing in the ears due to prolonged exposure to gunfire or loud noises.
    As far as exposing yourself or others to the effects of muzzle blast and loud noise I would not do it more than once if that it may do more harm than good if it causes damage to your or their hearing or makes them afraid of the weapon.

    THAT was my point. Yep. Once.

    I want my family members to know (some have never fired a weapon, and want to now protect themselves) just how loud that thing is, and being in a room in a deadly defensive situation at home is not the first time I want them to face the reality of "what the heck that's louder than I thought it would be.... pauuuuuuuse..."

    Same goes for shooting at targets, and then shooting at humans the first time. It's a shock. (Can't really "practice" that too much, heh).
    Same goes for when I was a medic, I had to practice on a "dummy" with CPR or sucking chest wounds, suturing, et cetera, and then when it happens...(Can't really "practice" that too much, either).

    But, there ARE things we "can" do to help replicate combat/SD.
    Paintball/airsoft/rubber knife training, and such. I've practiced martial arts for 15 years (Goju Ryu black belt/Okinawan Kempo green) and it's nice to know what a fist feels like in the gut, or a very hard twist to the wrist in a flip. I regularly do this, as others do, and yes, pain is part of the training.
    I do understand fully, the hearing aspect on "gunfire", and I'm not comparing it to the above with the "pain is part of the training" statement. I suppose "reality is part of the training" is more sufficient for gunfire.

    The interesting thing about "auditory exclusion" is that: In David Grossman's book, 'On Killing' (Deadly Force Encounters),
    Artwhol and Christian reported that 88% of people had auditory exclusion, 17% reported intensified sounds.
    Also, just as a side note from this and other studies, auditory exclusion "starts" around 175 heartbeats a minute. Interesting stuff to study. I'm going to read more on this (love to read)

    I do it ONCE for them, so that they have a grasp on it a little more clearly.
    Last edited by TheoryRealm; June 15th, 2010 at 12:36 PM.
    Stop acting like we're fightin' for "freedom". We are ALREADY....free.

  8. #23
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    I've practiced martial arts for 15 years (Goju Ryu black belt/Okinawan Kempo green) and it's nice to know what a fist feels like in the gut, or a very hard twist to the wrist in a flip.
    I've been kicked in the ribs, punched in the face, kicked in the face, kneed in the abs...kneed in the groin....not fun at all :(
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  9. #24
    Member Array TheoryRealm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    I've been kicked in the ribs, punched in the face, kicked in the face, kneed in the abs...kneed in the groin....not fun at all :(
    hehe amen, and aaaaayaaaahmeeeen.....ugh...


    Stop acting like we're fightin' for "freedom". We are ALREADY....free.

  10. #25
    Distinguished Member Array bladenbullet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    I've been kicked in the ribs, punched in the face, kicked in the face, kneed in the abs...kneed in the groin....not fun at all :(
    yowser...i tend to experiment with defenses on myself also to experience their effects...pepper spray was a big mistake for me but i was fortunate enough to try it while in the pool for instant relief...

    i understand what you were doing and can tell you that as one who was privy to an accidentla/negligent discharge in a small hallway it is quite a loud and dibilitating feeling...

    its a good thing to know what a gunshot sounds like at close range as you may ot be the one firing it and therefore not have the advantage of auditory exclusion because the adrenal response is not there yet...and knowing the sound and its effects may be helpful if it comes from behind or was not intended for you...being able to react without hesitation could be a life saver...as opposed to wandering aimlessly while you sort things out...

    as a hunter i am very familiar with auditory exclusion and it is amazing that when multiple shots have been taken you really dont feel the effects of them...

    be careful with it...ive worked in shops all my life and have tinitus and a significant loss of hearing...it isnt pretty and there are things i would do much differently if i had to do it over again....

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by bladenbullet View Post
    as a hunter i am very familiar with auditory exclusion and it is amazing that when multiple shots have been taken you really dont feel the effects of them...
    Yeah a few years back I fired 3 rounds from my Michigan deer rifle, Marlin lever in .35 Remington, and my ears rang for about a half hour. But no lasting ill effects.
    "Be justified. Blood may be easily wiped from the sword.
    It cannot, however, be put back from where it came." --Quicksabre

  12. #27
    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
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    Don't do it! My hearing is not the greatest due to the fact that while in Vietnam we did not know the exact moment that Charlie would lob a 122mm rocket at us. We didn't wear our hearing protection 24/7. We could not help that, but don't ruin your hearing if you can avoid it.
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  13. #28
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    My hearing is not the greatest due to the fact that while in Vietnam we did not know the exact moment that Charlie would lob a 122mm rocket at us.
    Glad you are still with us!
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  14. #29
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    Keep your eye pro on too.

    Just because I'm not going digging for my shades in a SD shooting situation doesn't mean I want to go blind practicing without.

  15. #30
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    For those who own a gun larger than a pistol, I would suggest some kind of sonic hearing protection to have by your bedside and be able to don it if a shooting is inevitable. Not only are you able to protect your ears from gunfire noise, it also enables you to hear muffled sounds. Great not only for hunting and conversations at the range but also for home defense. A muzzle blast from a gun is louder in an enclosed space than it is outside. And if it is from an AR-15 rifle or a 12-ga. shotgun, it can be very deafening.

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