Two Things I Learned This Week.

This is a discussion on Two Things I Learned This Week. within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; As I have detailed in a previous thread, I do almost all my shooting/training in the dark now, as I feel it is much more ...

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Thread: Two Things I Learned This Week.

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    Member Array ROFL SQUAD's Avatar
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    Two Things I Learned This Week.

    As I have detailed in a previous thread, I do almost all my shooting/training in the dark now, as I feel it is much more realistic in regards to when we might encounter trouble (or at least for me personally).

    I shoot between 100-200 rounds once a week, and this week I focused on malfunction drills by mixing in some dummy rounds and by setting up purposeful double feeds. I discovered that it takes more effort to recognize a malfunction or reload situation in the dark, as you are more reliant on your "feel" on how the gun is cycling, rather than your vision. Most people are used to seeing a malfunction in conjunction with perhaps feeling that FTF click, etc or seeing the slide lock back. Regardless, they tend to focus on the visual part to comprehend a problem, if they even see it at all!

    When its pitch black, you can mistake a slide lock for a FTF if you haven't been paying attention to how many rounds you have let loose, or the weight of the pistol in your hand decreasing. I found myself tap racking a empty chamber several times when I was indeed empty (mags purposefully loaded not to capacity w/ random round count).

    Going along with this thought, I also learned that it takes practice to do a brass check with no light. Especially if your hands are slippery. This includes recognizing a double feed, which is much easier to deal with in a lighted situation...

    Muscle memory is the key to deal with malfunctions under stress, as you go from a tunnel vision, etc condition to one that requires quite a bit of manual dexterity. Your body can't do precise things under stress, it will only default to your lowest level of training. So lots of dry draws and tap racks! I do roughly 50 or so before using live rounds as a warmup, minimum.

    Sparknotes: Learn how your gun "feels" when it malfunctions, don't rely on your sight to diagnose a condition, as it takes it your eyes off the suspect and could cause him to escape or kill you. Focus on clearing your pistol without looking at it.

    My 2 cents.

    J
    If you're going to carry one weapon, might as well carry two, because as the saying goes, "Two is one, and one is none."

    "Liberals can decline or whine, but I will still carry and conceal mine." - Cold Warrior. Excellent quote good sir!

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    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
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    Good information!
    Hiram25
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    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
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    Good points...will have to incorporate that.
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    Smart training...
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    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Rather than trying to figure out what my gun is doing in the dark, I prefer non-diagnostic malfunction clearence. If the gun doesn't fire, immeaditely do a tap-rack-bang. If you don't get the 'bang', go straight to rip-rack-reload. If you've practiced a lot, ddoing a TRB is really quick. Quicker than diagnosing the malfunction, particulary in low light. The key is to train this sequence enough that going to the rip-rack-reload is instinctive so you wont stand there TRBing an empty chamber.
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    Member Array ROFL SQUAD's Avatar
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    Blackeagle,

    I tap sweep rack bang almost every malfunction. I am very careful however, as I have been the victim of several squib rounds including one that I lost a Glock 17 to. Luckily I wasn't hurt, and it was during daylight shooting around an obstacle with someone else's progessive system loaded reloads. Fortunately, the other four or so I was able to catch the gun go out of battery that sneaky 1" inch or so during that class.

    I don't count on having this issue again as I only use my own [U]single stage loaded[U] ammo for night shooting. Regardless, the squib load situation can exist, and if it happens better hope you have a backup gun because your primary is out of the fight. And it'll make your very wary if you don't feel or see your slide go out of battery after a pop, you rack the slide, and you let go another round behind it! If you're letting off a string of rounds you can mistake the pop of a squib for a real shot that did go.

    J
    If you're going to carry one weapon, might as well carry two, because as the saying goes, "Two is one, and one is none."

    "Liberals can decline or whine, but I will still carry and conceal mine." - Cold Warrior. Excellent quote good sir!

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    Clarification Point: A squib is a round that has a live primer and bullet, but no gunpowder. The primer explosion is enough to discharge the bullet down into the barrel, causing it to stick and obstruct the next tip coming out. Bad times!
    If you're going to carry one weapon, might as well carry two, because as the saying goes, "Two is one, and one is none."

    "Liberals can decline or whine, but I will still carry and conceal mine." - Cold Warrior. Excellent quote good sir!

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