The Sight Continuum - Page 3

The Sight Continuum

This is a discussion on The Sight Continuum within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; If I may..... A simple, efffective self defense system ( I am partial to WW2 Combatives and the old Bruce Tegner books) have a handful ...

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  1. #31
    Senior Member Array Matthew Temkin's Avatar
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    If I may.....
    A simple, efffective self defense system ( I am partial to WW2 Combatives and the old Bruce Tegner books) have a handful of techniques that can be modified---even under stress-- to fit any situation.
    A classic example is the heel of hand/Tigers claw blow, which Fairbairn wrote, was the single most effective strike ever devised.
    This blow can break any front assualt/grab ( provided that one hand is free) and can also be used to intercept and prevent any grab attempt before it is completed or even attempted.
    I suppose the only other "martial art" which is similar to this ( as one one NYPD detective who I trained decades ago pointed out) is boxing.
    Naturally teaching such a system for a living ( as Applegate once joked) is impossible because either the student will realize that after three months or so he has it all and will drop out, or the instructor will begin to add so many other techniques ( to keep students returning) that he orginal purpose will be lost.
    The same can be said about shooting, stick fighting and, yes, knife fighting.
    The only complicated thing is for the instructor who wishes to make his living teaching self defense and turns to combatives.
    Which is one reason why I will never derive my total income from teaching any type of self defense.
    PS..looking forward to seeing some familar and not so familar faces here in NYC in two weeks.
    Last edited by Matthew Temkin; July 17th, 2006 at 10:50 PM.


  2. #32
    Member Array 7677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Temkin
    If I may.....
    A simple, efffective self defense system ( I am partial to WW2 Combatives and the old Bruce Tegner books) have a handful of techniques that can be modified---even under stress-- to fit any situation.
    A classic example is the heel of hand/Tigers claw blow, which Fairbairn wrote, was the single most effective strike ever devised.
    This blow can break any front assault/grab ( provided that one hand is free) and can also be used to intercept and prevent any grab attempt before it is completed or even attempted.
    I suppose the only other "martial art" which is similar to this ( as one NYPD detective who I trained decades ago pointed out) is boxing.
    Naturally teaching such a system for a living ( as Applegate once joked) is impossible because either the student will realize that after three months or so he has it all and will drop out, or the instructor will begin to add so many other techniques ( to keep students returning) that he original purpose will be lost.
    The same can be said about shooting, stick fighting and, yes, knife fighting.
    The only complicated thing is for the instructor who wishes to make his living teaching self defense and turns to combatives.
    Which is one reason why I will never derive my total income from teaching any type of self defense.
    PS..looking forward to seeing some familiar and not so familiar faces here in NYC in two weeks.
    Matt you are so correct with your above comments and I’ll add the following:

    The problem usually comes when one tries to explain what comes natural to a person on the range into the written medium. What I wrote is a guide to explain the options that point shooting adds to the toolbox and so they will understand what they will do naturally on the range. On the range, they do not have to think about it because the response a) is natural to them b) comes as second nature (no thought time) c) it is the right technique for the problem. This does not happen when someone that has never used point shooting reads Shooting To Live or Killed or Be Killed.

    With regards to giving people to many choices is concerned, a student can dine from the buffet of tactics and techniques until his heart is content but in reality, he/she is going to find what works form them. This is going to be their core techniques the amount will be different depending on the individual but it is going to be a low number. These are the techniques they are going to master and Matt’s tiger’s claw is the perfect example. Also as Matt pointed out, point shooting and combatives techniques are easy and simple to teach and learn and once the student has learn them it is up to the student to practice what they learned. There are no belts or levels just what is simple and works and it does not take years to learn or master it.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Matt and 7677, very good points on keeping things simple. I agree with both of you that the written word complicates these techniques much more than just doing it.

    It is no coincidence that the guy that writes about this stuff the most , just has the students do it, when he is training them in person.

    I bet the last thing that the people that know me from the forums expect to hear, is my students saying things such as this:

    I went through 1800 rounds in a nine hour period, on a day where the temperature went up to 114 degrees. You don't go through that much ammo by listening to lectures, and you don't hang around in that kind of heat if you're bored (I live at 6200ft altitude, 85 degrees is hot for me). This course wasn't about theories, legalities, or doctrines about where to put your feet or which geometric shapes to make with your arms. It was about zippering, hammering, and otherwise shooting targets "to the ground."
    If you train with Roger, be prepared to put some time in behind the gun. Almost all of the training is DOING, not listening. I thought I had some decent calouses, but not so! Bring some bandaids, or tape your fingers before they get too bad...
    I write to raise interest........ I train people to teach life saving skills....there is a big difference between the two!

    My students can spend one or two days with me and never need to come back. They have all the skills and knowledge they need for this particular piece of the puzzle. They have 30-40 new skills to work with and pick through.

    See my signature line.

  4. #34
    Member Array kilogulf59's Avatar
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    7677, Matt, and Roger are aces in my book...Even though it's only been in writing, I have learned a lot from you gents...Thanks.

    Though I don't know as I'd want to shoot 1800 rounds in a day...wow!
    Take Care and Stay Safe,
    Ken

    NRA Member
    Administrator Integrated Close Combat Forum

    REMEMBER – What works for you may not, necessarily, work for me. Keep an open mind!

  5. #35
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilogulf59
    7677, Matt, and Roger are aces in my book...Even though it's only been in writing, I have learned a lot from you gents...Thanks.

    Though I don't know as I'd want to shoot 1800 rounds in a day...wow!
    Thank you for the kind words Ken.

    My private students get to dictate how hard they want to work. This paticular student told me "I've never wanted to stop training before." So I broke out the quality band-aids and we went to work. This was one very hard core individual. We did two of three hours of airsoft in my garage on Friday night. Headed out to the desert at 4:30 in the morning and stayed out there in 114 degree temperatures till around 3:30 PM.

    I just deliver what my students want.

    7677's sight continuum was mentioned numerous times in that training session. BOT!

  6. #36
    Member Array kilogulf59's Avatar
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    Roger, I wouldn't have said it if it wasn't true...

    I might have trained like that years ago but not now. "Hardcore" in a gross understatement IMHO...
    Take Care and Stay Safe,
    Ken

    NRA Member
    Administrator Integrated Close Combat Forum

    REMEMBER – What works for you may not, necessarily, work for me. Keep an open mind!

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