Combative Anatomy revisited

This is a discussion on Combative Anatomy revisited within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Combative Anatomy is the study of how to stop a human from performing a violent action in the shortest amount of time using anatomy and ...

Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Combative Anatomy revisited

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,067

    Combative Anatomy revisited

    Combative Anatomy is the study of how to stop a human from performing a violent action in the shortest amount of time using anatomy and physiology. With Combative Anatomy, there is no consideration of pain or psychology, just mechanics.

    Combative Anatomy applies to all interpersonal combat including open hand combatives, impact weapons, edged weapons, and firearm. You notice that these are listed in the order in which man began to use them. At contact distance, the root of all interpersonal combat is the open hand, it just holds different tools.

    Law of Extension- in order for someone to attack at contact distance, they have no choice but to extend themselves to you. The arms, and legs, and then the head. It is their attack that allows us to defend.

    Structural System- comprised of bones, muscles, ligaments, and tendon. This is the frame of the body and what attaches it. The base of the structural system is the skeletal system. The skeletal system consists of two parts, the Axial Skeleton comprised of the skull, spine, and ribcage, and the Appendicular skeleton, comprised of the limbs, shoulders, and pelvis. The Appendicular skeleton is our focus, most specifically the elbows, and knees. Being hinge joints, they only bend one way. Targeting them is a priority in Combative Anatomy. Crushing the elbow will limit the attackers ability to hold a weapon or attack with that arm. Knees are the weak link in our base. Crushing the knee will limit the attackers ability to walk/stand, and uses their hips to generate force. The elbow is most efficiently attacked from the rear of the arm, just above the joint at the insertion point of the tricep. The knee, from the side, targeting the ACL. Even under stress, damage to the hinge joint is easily identified.

    Central Nervous System- comprised of the brain (computer) and spinal cord (power strip). The Central Nervous System is electricity. Because of ritualized combat, we usually fight attackers head on. In most cases, this puts the spinal cord out of reach. However, at contact distance, the head/skull/brain is an obvious target. The slightest bump to the head will at least cause the eyes to slam shut and disrupt the processing of information needed to fight. Striking the Frontal Lobe interrupts thinking, problem solving, planning, and some parts of movement. All very necessary to fight. Striking the Occipital Lobe (rear of brain) impairs vision. It is hard to fight what you cannot see. The best way to attack the CNS is with open hand strikes to the side of the head, or slamming your attacker backwards into a vertical surface.

    Circulatory System- comprised of the heart, arteries, and veins, the circulatory is the plumbing of the body. Causing trauma requires it to be punctured or cut which necessitates the use of a weapon. Although trauma to the circulatory system is more likely to cause eventual death than trauma to the structural or central nervous systems, it is often the slowest to have an effect on the ability of the attacker to keep going. Puncturing the circulatory system with en edged weapon or a bullet is just like punching holes in a drum filled with water. Depending on where the drum is hit makes all the difference in how long it takes to empty. Even in the best case scenario, this is very slow.

    Think of the human body as a house getting a roof put on. There are workers on the roof. The fastest way to stop the workers is by knocking one or more of the walls in (structural). The second fastest is the Central Nervous System (electric) all the power tools just stop. The slowest way is to turn off the plumbing (Circulatory System). Without plumbing, the work may continue for some time. With out a roof to stand on or electricity to power the tools, work cannot continue.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    7,862
    I have read this several times, and am at a little loss as to what point you are trying to make? Most of the info here is nothing new, except put forth with analogys and comparatives, so help me here.

  4. #3
    Ex Member Array Glocksin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in Georgia
    Posts
    362
    The law of extension is one of the best things anyone could be aware of.When the attacker is committed to making a move,its now a problem for them.You have a choice,and if properly trained can act upon that path of movement they are going to make.The first one to make a move has a slight disadvantage.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,067
    As it relates to firearms it is the understanding that humans are bullet sponges and counting on rounds, especially those from handguns, to drain the bad guy to the point where he cannot fight anymore takes a long time.

    As it relates to open hand combatives for those carrying firearms it is to show that open hand combatives and pistol work fit together well.

    As it relates to knife people, it is to illustrate that a pommel smash to the head will likely stop a fight faster than a stab through the heart. - George

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    7,862
    Sounds more like junk pseudo bastardized martial arts crap to me. You can apply science to whatever you want, but when it's time to get down to it, all the theory junk goes out the window.
    Mike Tyson said it best when he was asked about his opponents stategy against him he replied" Everybody got a plan, till they get hit in the mouth".

    Mercop, this in no way is meant as an insult to you or your post. It's just not something I believe in.

  7. #6
    Ex Member Array EB31's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    539
    I agree heavily with glockman on this.

    Training helps. Being skilled helps. Plans are nice. Nothing is absolute.

  8. #7
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,319
    We are taught that it is the attacker decides how they will die (not you) by the law of extension. While I train sometimes to be the aggressor, my style is mostly that of defense/response.

    Mike Tyson said it best when he was asked about his opponents stategy against him he replied" Everybody got a plan, till they get hit in the mouth".
    Also true. And the only way to really make a "plan" work is to train at it so often it becomes automatic so when the SDHTF you won't have to worry about screwing up the "plan"

    Learn principles, not plans.
    Glock 19
    Kahr PM9
    LMT-M4
    Mossberg 590
    Shodan, Jujutsu

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    7,862
    I can say with 100 percent conviction that training for a fight in a controled enviroment and fighting in real life are very, very different. I don't advertise it, but I hold a a ranking in a couple of martial arts, incloding tradional Chinese kenpo. I engage in several altercations every year, and it all comes down to heart, and extreme animal aggression. Techniques , principles and such give one a level of confidence, and that's a good thing.
    The problem begins, when it's for real, and a real threat to your physical well being is in progress. Can you take a slash to the arm or stab to the ribs from a shank or knife and still maintain that?
    It comes down to how much dog is in you, and how vicious you will get.
    Training is always a good thing, but when it fails you, or is not working like it did in the dojo, you had better have some intestinal fortitude to draw from.

    You can teach Harry Potter all the gung fooey crap in the world, but if he doesn't have the DOG in him, he's still just a four eyed geek with some fancy moves. He will be food.
    By the way, I wear glasses so don't take offense to the 4 eye thing:)

  10. #9
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,319
    Can you take a slash to the arm or stab to the ribs from a shank or knife and still maintain that?
    It comes down to how much dog is in you, and how vicious you will get.
    Training is always a good thing, but when it fails you, or is not working like it did in the dojo, you had better have some intestinal fortitude to draw from.
    I agree with you, there are some things you just can't train for, you have to experience.
    Glock 19
    Kahr PM9
    LMT-M4
    Mossberg 590
    Shodan, Jujutsu

  11. #10
    Senior Member Array stevem174's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    I have read this several times, and am at a little loss as to what point you are trying to make? Most of the info here is nothing new, except put forth with analogys and comparatives, so help me here.
    glockman, I don't disagree with you at all, however, this may not be anything new for you. There are people on the forum that hasn't been educated yet. Some of us have an idea how much dog we bring to a fight. Others hasn't been tested yet.
    Don't do things you don't want to explain to the Paramedics!

    Stupidity should be painful.

  12. #11
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    7,862
    I understand this. I'll stand down.

  13. #12
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,067
    I am far from fancy:)

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,319
    Quote Originally Posted by mercop View Post
    I am far from fancy:)
    ditto, nothing fancy about what I practice, we get down an dirty.... There hasn;t been one night without blood on the mat or someone's uniform, LOL.

    Not a class for the weak willed. We study it as combat like the samurai and not so much a sport.
    Glock 19
    Kahr PM9
    LMT-M4
    Mossberg 590
    Shodan, Jujutsu

  15. #14
    Member Array Threadbare's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42
    Good info. I don't have the benefit that a black belt or martial arts ranking affords, nor the experience that comes with multiple violent encounters annually, so, for me, this type of information could be very helpful in ending an assault on me or mine.

  16. #15
    Member Array plotdog99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    north carolina
    Posts
    40
    I have taken a combative handgun class also a level one knife and stick class just becouse i like those sort of classes. I also bear hunt with dogs and at times you had better have youre stuff together. I hope it never happens but if trouble happens i hope that some of the training and alot of common sense kicks in

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Gray's Anatomy Gun
    By heritage1865 in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: May 24th, 2010, 10:54 AM
  2. Combative Anatomy for pistol
    By mercop in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: January 6th, 2010, 03:27 PM
  3. Evolution of Combative Anatomy
    By mercop in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: November 28th, 2008, 12:16 PM
  4. Anatomy of an IDPA match.
    By Miggy in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: October 14th, 2005, 03:59 PM

Search tags for this page

cardiac anatomy revisited
,
combative anatimy
,

combative anatomy

,
combatives anatomy
,
knives that work fit mossberg 590
,
mike tyson everybody got a plan till they get hit wav file
,
tactical anatomy vs combative anatomy vs defensive anatomy
Click on a term to search for related topics.