Ten Elements of Threat Focused Shooting

Ten Elements of Threat Focused Shooting

This is a discussion on Ten Elements of Threat Focused Shooting within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Threat focus shooting is something that is best done without thinking about it. It is a technique that is best shown, then done. That is ...

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Thread: Ten Elements of Threat Focused Shooting

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Ten Elements of Threat Focused Shooting

    Threat focus shooting is something that is best done without thinking about it. It is a technique that is best shown, then done. That is the truth of the matter, but because of this it is often seen as some sort of parlor trick or worse, something that is not accurate or dependable. I would like to take an approach to this that I have not seen before. That approach being, to try to break down why threat focus shooting actually works. By breaking it down to it's "bare bones" we could take some of the mystique away.

    There are many elements that go into accurate threat focused shooting and by knowing exactly what those elements are we will see that we are actually using a very well developed aiming system. By knowing that it is a well developed aiming system, the confidence in the technique will soar and when the time comes that you need it, it will be there like a trusted friend.

    First lets look at the elements of sighted fire.

    (1)Kinesthetic alignment

    (2)Sight alignment

    (3)Sight picture

    This is a very simple and highly effective form of sighting in. But it is also something that is, in the most part, done on a conscious level.


    Now let us look at the elements of threat focus shooting.

    (1) Understanding and ability to square up.

    (2) Understanding and ability to use the centerline.

    (3) Understanding and ability to draw "Parallel to the ground."

    (4) Understanding and ability to use your true visual centerline or as 7677 calls it, the nose index.

    (6) Understanding and ability to use a body index.

    (5) Kinesthetic alignment.

    (7) Use of peripheral vision verification.

    (8) Use of ones natural ability to point your finger at an object.

    (9) Use of ones natural hand/eye coordination.

    (10) Absolute confidence, knowing this all adds up to a very accurate system.

    When broken down into it's elements it hardly looks mystical anymore. It seems to be a highly developed aiming system. Another thing to take into consideration is that almost all of this is done on a subconscious level. These are elements that you do not have to think about. That is why threat focused shooting is best done without thinking about it. Once you know the elements, trained with the elements, it all comes together in a micro second with zero conscious thought. This is why threat focused shooting excels in dynamic confrontations. It is a natural human response.
    ____________________________________________

    There is a lot of misconception out there that threat focused shooting and especially FAS, is stance or position dependent. This is just not the case. "Shooting to Live" and "Bullseyes don't Shoot Back" cover the basics of threat focus shooting, nothing more.

    The basics elements are as follows,

    (1) Understanding and ability to square up.

    (2) Understanding and ability to use the centerline.

    (3) Understanding and ability to draw "Parallel to the ground."

    (4) Understanding and ability to use a body index.

    (5) Kinesthetic alignment.

    (6) Use of ones natural ability to point your finger at an object.

    The advanced elements take threat focus shooting to a whole other level, this is where you begin to make hits from any position, from any angle, with no conscious thought.

    (1) Understanding and ability to use your true visual centerline, or what 7677 calls, your nose index.

    (2) Use of peripheral vision verification.

    (3) Use of ones natural hand/eye coordination.

    (4) Absolute confidence, knowing this all adds up to a very accurate system.

    The tenth element (absolute confidence) is the key and the ultimate goal. You can never reach your full potential until you a firm grasps of the basic elements and an absolute understanding of the advanced elements.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array KC135's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Variables

    Way too many.

    Requires almost daily practice to stay proficient.

    Works well only one plane.

    Does not work well during movement.

    Try it in different situations and the problems can be seen.

    Distance is your friend, and standing still and shooting may get you dead.

    If you like it, use it, but I'll pass.
    Keep the shotgun handy!!

  3. #3
    Member Array DaveT's Avatar
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    Just my opinion, but all that is way too deep and very confusing for the average person.

    As one who has been involved in a shooting and ending the life of a person who took a shot at me, I can tell you from my own experience that things happen way too fast to consider all that stuff.

    The key to living through a situation is a lot simpler..... practice to the point where everything that happens from the neck down is accomplished by instinctive reflex when all that training takes over.

    I still use the phrase that I used to teach in motorcycle safety classes: SIPDE. It works well for concealed carry as well:

    S - scan
    I - Identify
    P - Predict
    D - Decide
    E - Execute

    SIPDE is a constant mental process, used for everything from riding a motorcycle to driving a car, and looking for potential threats in the concealed carry environment.

    Once the SIPDE process becomes a part of one's thought process, the brain, eyes and ears do the work. Once a threat is identified and a course of action is decided, the execution is where constant practice comes into play and why I used the phrase above: "everything that happens from the neck down is accomplished by instinctive reflex when all that training takes over."

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array dimmak's Avatar
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    good food for thought....

    Another useful tool in honing skills is repetitive use of Airsoft guns in various drills...
    "Ray Nagin is a colossal disappointment" - NRA/ILA Executive Director Chris W. Cox.


    "...be water, my friend."

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array AirForceShooter's Avatar
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    if you can't do it in 4 steps it's not worth a damn.
    Took me 20 years to figure that out.

    AFS
    Gun control is hitting what you aim at

  6. #6
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    If Bob Munden can toss aspirin tablets up into the air and "powder" them 9 times out of 10 (the width of the moving "target" being LESS than the diameter of the fired projectile) and do it without using his handgun sights - then the average "Joe Person" can easily learn to consistently hit COM on a man size target at realistic self~defense distances by shooting at it instinctively.
    Just my personal opinion on that.

    It is really not much different than being able to quickly and instinctively hit EVERYTHING when you were a kid with your Slingshot or a Bean shooter - neither of which have sights.
    I started early instinctively popping bottles, tin cans, frogs, (name it and whatever) with a .22 rifle.
    It's the same thing...only with a handgun & not a rifle.
    It's just making use of our natural ability to put something where we want it to go.

    I have a decided advantage in that I don't have to teach it - and I don't have to promote it...and I don't even have to care who wants to learn it and who does not want to learn it ~ I only have to do it for myself. It works for me.

    That being said...when I was a little boy my Mother always told me...she said:

    "QKShooter...My Dear, Dear, Son...Some Day...You are either going to grow up to become President Of The United States...or a great Moderator on CombatCarry.com ~ There are three things NEVER to argue on any Internet Firearm Forum...those three things would be; Religion, Politics, & The Merits Of Instinctive Shooting."

    I hear you Mom...I'm staying out of this one too!

  7. #7
    Member Array Pickpocket's Avatar
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    Eh - either way, I think you got the more rewarding job out of your two options.

  8. #8
    Member Array Glock35's Avatar
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    The problem is we all learned how to shoot the wrong way, imo.
    We should have started by using our middle fingers to pull the trigger and pointing with our index (just like quick-draw shooting). Reminds me of how we use a computer mouse today, points like 2nd nature.
    My uncle did this over 10yrs ago and was one hell of a quick shot and was shooting empty soda cans for 7/10 at the min.
    He stopped once a 357 went through his calf though

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC135
    Way too many.

    Requires almost daily practice to stay proficient.

    Works well only one plane.

    Does not work well during movement.

    Try it in different situations and the problems can be seen.

    Distance is your friend, and standing still and shooting may get you dead.

    If you like it, use it, but I'll pass.
    There is nothing that you have said that my experience agrees with.

    I can...... and have, taught the ten elements to anyone in less than five minutes. This is all done at a subconscious level in a micro second. Once you own the knowledge and the skills, maintenance is minimal......much less than sighted fire! What is so hard about that?

    This is a very versatile system and covers the ability to make hits through your entire drawstroke, one handed and two. You can also hit anything from any position and any angle at logical distances.

    This absolutely excels with movement out to around seven yards. Dynamic movement is the one key area that makes threat focused skills absolutely necessary.

    Could you please tell me the situatons, besides outside of logical distances or precision shots. Those of course, would require that you use your sights. Getting to the sights is my default, but I will not die trying to get to something that may be impossible for me to get to.

    Did you read my post? The second half let's you know that this is not a stance dependent technique. Distance is not always a luxury that you will have and standing still has nothing to do with my first post.

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array Old Chief's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveT
    I still use the phrase that I used to teach in motorcycle safety classes: SIPDE. It works well for concealed carry as well:

    S - scan
    I - Identify
    P - Predict
    D - Decide
    E - Execute

    SIPDE is a constant mental process, used for everything from riding a motorcycle to driving a car, and looking for potential threats in the concealed carry environment. "
    Here is a concept that i can get my head around.

  11. #11
    Member Array Pickpocket's Avatar
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    The OODA Loop - for you military guys out there :)

    O - observe
    O - orient
    D - decide
    A - act

  12. #12
    Member Array spud's Avatar
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    SIPDE will now be part of daily life, never heard it like that

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array Tubby45's Avatar
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    My reaction plan involves one step: make it out alive.
    07/02 FFL/SOT since 2006

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array KC135's Avatar
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    Question Stance, movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Sweatnbullets
    There is nothing that you have said that my experience agrees with.

    I can...... and have, taught the ten elements to anyone in less than five minutes. This is all done at a subconscious level in a micro second. Once you own the knowledge and the skills, maintenance is minimal......much less than sighted fire! What is so hard about that?

    This is a very versatile system and covers the ability to make hits through your entire drawstroke, one handed and two. You can also hit anything from any position and any angle at logical distances.

    This absolutely excels with movement out to around seven yards. Dynamic movement is the one key area that makes threat focused skills absolutely necessary.

    Could you please tell me the situatons, besides outside of logical distances or precision shots. Those of course, would require that you use your sights. Getting to the sights is my default, but I will not die trying to get to something that may be impossible for me to get to.

    Did you read my post? The second half let's you know that this is not a stance dependent technique. Distance is not always a luxury that you will have and standing still has nothing to do with my first post.
    Yes I read your complete post twice before I replied. I just reread it again.

    Distance--you grab distance, stance--I never mentioned stance--

    Target is moving and so am I. I need my front sight--if you don't OK--And you must not have read my post--"If you like it , use it, But I'll pass."

    Last I'll quote you: "There is nothing you have said that my experience agrees with." Same here. Will have to agree to disagree on this training.

    Last, remember any decision that must be made takes time--and time that can be better spent catching up and getting ahead of the other guy's OODA loop.
    Keep the shotgun handy!!

  15. #15
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveT
    Just my opinion, but all that is way too deep and very confusing for the average person.

    As one who has been involved in a shooting and ending the life of a person who took a shot at me, I can tell you from my own experience that things happen way too fast to consider all that stuff.

    The key to living through a situation is a lot simpler..... practice to the point where everything that happens from the neck down is accomplished by instinctive reflex when all that training takes over.

    I still use the phrase that I used to teach in motorcycle safety classes: SIPDE. It works well for concealed carry as well:

    S - scan
    I - Identify
    P - Predict
    D - Decide
    E - Execute

    SIPDE is a constant mental process, used for everything from riding a motorcycle to driving a car, and looking for potential threats in the concealed carry environment.

    Once the SIPDE process becomes a part of one's thought process, the brain, eyes and ears do the work. Once a threat is identified and a course of action is decided, the execution is where constant practice comes into play and why I used the phrase above: "everything that happens from the neck down is accomplished by instinctive reflex when all that training takes over."
    Very nice! This analogy is becoming more and more popular. The first time I heard it, it was actually from an anti-pointshooter. Boy did he make my point for me about being able to hit whatever you see at logical distances.

    The last time I heard the analogy was just yesterday in my last students AAR of the course I ran him through here in Vegas.

    Here is an attachment to that AAR.
    Attached Files

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