Looking At Holster When Reholstering - Mistake or Advantage?

Looking At Holster When Reholstering - Mistake or Advantage?

This is a discussion on Looking At Holster When Reholstering - Mistake or Advantage? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Ok....get ready to kill another cow. The issue is looking at the holster on the reholstering. I know....I know...we are told its bad, its wrong, ...

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Thread: Looking At Holster When Reholstering - Mistake or Advantage?

  1. #1
    Member Array Gabe Suarez's Avatar
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    Looking At Holster When Reholstering - Mistake or Advantage?

    Ok....get ready to kill another cow. The issue is looking at the holster on the reholstering. I know....I know...we are told its bad, its wrong, it will lead to all manner of bad things (to include disapproval by gun gurus), ect. But why is it wrong? Or is it?

    Let me lay my case out.

    1). According to our research, half of all unintended discharges resulting in shooter injury occur during the holstering process. Sure...sometimes it is due to trigger fingers not being properly indexed, but there have been as many times when it has happened due to some sort of obstruction in the holster, or misplacement of the pistol into the holster. The currently "popular" handgun instructor’s penchant for violently slamming their handguns back into their kydex holsters immediately comes to mind.

    2). If the threat was still a threat, only a stupid idiot would be holstering his pistol. Read that again guys. If the threat was still a threat, why are you holstering?

    3). Often the police guys (I was once one) will say they have to holster in order to handcuff someone. That changes nothing. You do not point a gun at someone and then holster to handcuff. You hold them there at gun point until your back up arrives and he points his gun at the bad. Then you holster and go handcuff. Even if you were in a position to do it alone sans back-up ( a very bad tactic but sometimes things may happen ), the bad guy would not be standing around combatively doing as he pleases. He would be proned out in a position of disadvantage otherwise you would not be trying to handcuff him alone. So the ability to keep eyes on target before holstering is of dubious necessity.

    So, is it a big deal if a shooter looks at his holster briefly prior to holstering his piece? Me? I don't think so.

    Now to shut the all-or-nothing crowd that will invariably think I am telling people to walk around gazing at the kydexial splendor of their holsters for hours as they replace the handgun, let me point out this.

    What I am saying is that a quick glance to verify everything is as it should be before introducing the pistol into the holster is a good idea in most cases regardless of the pistol, the carry mode or the holster.

    I spent 15 years in LE service and I saw many many guys who had been drilled to NOT LOOK at the holster, still do so very briefly when holstering. It is the same principal we see in other actions under duress. The eyes want to see what the hands are doing . And maybe trying to untrain a natural tendency is a waste of time…specially if it is unnecessary.

    So are we being foolish to tell the students that there is no threat in the holster? That they should keep their eyes downrange while they holster the pistol?

    In my not so humble (and always opinionated) opinion, yes we are. There is nothing wrong with looking at the holster when replacing the pistol. If there was a threat, your pistol would remain in action. If there is no threat, your safety is better served by holstering safely.

    Give Us Your Opinion On This


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Old School's Avatar
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    "If there was a threat, your pistol would remain in action. If there is no threat, your safety is better served by holstering safely".

    That about says it all.
    "Violence is seldom the answer, but when it is the answer it is the only answer".

    "A nation of sheep breeds a government of wolves".

    http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array Luis50's Avatar
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    Personally, I always peek. Most of my range time is from concealment wearing everyday clothes so it's not an option for me. In my opinion speed is only important when drawing. Holstering is slow and deliberate.

    Good observations. Thanks for posting.
    Luis

    "Everybody's got a plan, 'til they get hit".

    Mike Tyson

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luis50 View Post
    In my opinion speed is only important when drawing. Holstering is slow and deliberate.

    Good observations. Thanks for posting.
    I'm with you on this.

    Anytime there is an increased risk of an ND then you need to be paying attention. Clearing, holstering, unholstering, rehostering, cleaning, whatever.

    Great read.
    I prefer to live dangerously free than safely caged!

    "Our houses are protected by the good Lord and a gun. And you might meet 'em both if you show up here not welcome son." Josh Thompson "Way Out Here"

  5. #5
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    I don't see a problem with looking at the holster to reholster.
    Then again, I think that the necessity of it is circumstance dependent. I do not mean the circumstances of a situation, but personal ones. I do not look when I reholster and I do not use kydex, just don't like it. I carry/shoot a 92FS and when I reholster my thumb rides the slide and hammer. It is just about impossible to fire the pistol when gripped in this manner, I have tried it. Aside from the near impossibility of firing, I can feel any movement by the slide or hammer while reholstering, alerting me to stop and see what is going on. Were I to carry a striker fired pistol, I would be more concerned with a possible ND and look while reholstering.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
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    I look. I pretty much have to look. I carry IWB in a hybrid and sometimes the top edge of my jeans, just maybe 1/8", will fold over the opening after my gun has been drawn. When I wore leather OWB I never looked. Safety first. And that means looking now.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    I'm a "looker," since during the reholster process you are pointing the muzzle at yourself, and you want to be careful about that. Also, you might want to practice a speed draw, but I don't see any need for "speed re-holstering." It's something to do in a calm, deliberate fashion. Until Gabe brought this up, I wasn't aware that there were people who made a point of not looking.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I don't look, holster is in same place everytime no thumb break to get in the way etc. on my OWB leather holster as I slide my 1911 in I push the body shield away from the thumb safety
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  9. #9
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    I see nothing wrong with a quick look. I know that you should keep your attention on the threat, but if there is still a threat, as a civilian, I am not going to holster my weapon.

    Just think of how much of your attention is going to be diverted from the threat if you "reholster", and either put a hole in your leg, or miss your holster, or do something else stupid.

    I think if I quick peek gives helps and takes time off the re-holstering process, and gives the user more confidence, then it should be done.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
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    It doesn't hurt to look, do what makes you feel safe.
    Hiram25
    You can educate ignorance, you can't fix stupid
    Retired DE Trooper, SA XD40 SC, S&W 2" Airweight
    dukalmighty & Pure Kustom Black Ops Pro "Trooper" Holsters, DE CCDW and LEOSA Permits, Vietnam Vet 68-69 Pleiku

  11. #11
    Member Array TravisABQ's Avatar
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    I carry at appendix position.

    You bet I *LOOK*.

    Nobody ever won a gunfight by how fast and "cool" he reholsters.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array psychophipps's Avatar
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    There is a distinct difference between a quick glance down and looking like a two-year old trying to fit a square peg into a round hole.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array Tala's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luis50 View Post
    Personally, I always peek. Most of my range time is from concealment wearing everyday clothes so it's not an option for me. In my opinion speed is only important when drawing. Holstering is slow and deliberate.

    Good observations. Thanks for posting.
    I'm with you on this as well. I can take all the time and care in the world to re-holster, or else I wouldn't be reholstering! duh!
    I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them. -- John Wayne as John B. Books in "The Shootist"

  14. #14
    Member Array cerakoter's Avatar
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    "See what you need to see." Works for sights and holsters and all kinds of stuff related.

  15. #15
    Ex Member Array Kerby's Avatar
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    I have given a lot of effort in not looking //// to no avail I always look can not help it no matter what my eyes go down to the holster every time...???

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