how many of us practice....? reloading technique

how many of us practice....? reloading technique

This is a discussion on how many of us practice....? reloading technique within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; just a couple of quick questions.... how many of us practice reloading skills regularly? there are three types: 1 Administrative reload , initial loading, often ...

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Thread: how many of us practice....? reloading technique

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array MR D's Avatar
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    how many of us practice....? reloading technique

    just a couple of quick questions....

    how many of us practice reloading skills regularly?

    there are three types:
    1 Administrative reload, initial loading, often happens at kitchen table or in bedroom

    2 Tactical reload during a lull hopefully while BG is down or you are behind cover, topping off

    3 Emergency reload slide locks back in mid fight, or revolver goes click twice in succession (or if you are old school and you counted to six)


    How many of us practice reloading one handed?

    You are injured or become injured in the fight and need to reload, how do you do it?

    how many practice shooting while injured?

    your left arm is in a cast and you break you trigger finger while diving for cover.....

    (Just curious, this is all stuff we used to train for back in the days of cheap gasoline and cheaper ammo...)(okay lots of the ammo was free...thanks Uncle)



  2. #2
    Member Array djturnz's Avatar
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    If your left is in a cast and you break your right trigger finger diving for cover you are one un-lucky, accident prone SOB. I guess you could turn the gun upside down and shoot it with your pinky?

    Kidding aside, no I don't practice most of that, and what I do practice doesn't happen nearly enough. I am often wondering how I would continue to fight with my HD shotgun if I had only one good arm. There was a discussion on it at shotgunworld.com. The only consensus reached was that grabbing the pump and "jerking the gun off" like in terminator wasn't a good idea.

    I guess I do practice the kitchen table reload quite abit.

  3. #3
    Member Array Whirlwind06's Avatar
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    I have been practicing reloading my revolver with a speed loader lately.
    I have been using snap caps at home.

    It is not going very well. Trying to do it without looking is not easy.
    Switching the firearm from one hand to another. Trying to index the cylinder.

    It is kind of making me rethink my choice of carry. I know if I keep practicing I'll get better. But with limited time maybe I should stick to autos.

  4. #4
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    I practice but never enough - often have to use dummy rounds and include reload practice in dry fire drills tho that is never as good as live fire work.

    This is particularly true with revo's - where in an ideal situation you want to have to dump the empties first (potential trouble stage!) and then stuff in the reload fast.

    Bottom line - reload drills of all sorts cannot IMO ever be practiced too much. Losing and avoiding that ''fumble'' factor is needy of much practice.
    Chris - P95
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    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


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  5. #5
    Member Array zxd9's Avatar
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    Get involved in some IPSC or IDPA matches and you'll get lots of practice. Between matches and my own weekly range practice I get to load an empty gun from a table, load from slide lock, reload on the run, etc. I haven't yet seen a stage where you have a broken strong arm and a broken finger on the other hand.

    I think it is probably a good idea to try and see how capable you are under extreme circumstances.

  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array SixBravo's Avatar
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    I can admit that I probably don't practice tactical reloads as often as I should. I gotta be honest. Admin reloads are pretty standard stuff, or should be, if you own a handgun. I would say I practice emergency reloads more often than anything. Probably not the most ideal thing for all situations, but that's just my experience.

    I can imagine some people would freeze, even momentarily, if they were in a 2- or 3-on-1. In those situations it is unlikely most of us would be able to place every round into a BG, so you are going to have to reload. So... I tend to practice for Emergency Situations more than anything.
    "Train for the worst" kind of mentality I guess.

  7. #7
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    I used to practice a lot. Reloads, simulated malfunctions, off hand shooting, shooting moving left/right and advancing/retreating. One handed drills. I did some combat courses with pop up targets and all. I got pretty good too!

    Now the temptation is to feel prepaired because of my past abilities and not practice at all! SHEESH!
    ALWAYS carry! - NEVER tell!

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  8. #8
    Member Array paknheat's Avatar
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    I have dummy rounds and empty brass i use for reload training. I usually just limit it to simulated running the gun dry.I have'nt been training much lately due to injuries and recent surgery. Or maybe i should . After all i would'nt have to simulate my physical limitations.
    A armed person is a citizen-An unarmed person is a future victim.

  9. #9
    Member Array djturnz's Avatar
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    At my club they teach that if there is a break in the fighting you should put in a fresh magazine (tactical reload?). How would you do that with a revolver? Do you let live rounds drop?

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR D
    how many of us practice reloading skills regularly?
    Yes: initial, tactical and emergency. Not as often as I should, but enough to know how under a variety of circumstances. Enough to be relatively competent. Better prepared than rudely awakened.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
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  11. #11
    Member Array Blackhawk6's Avatar
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    I practice reloads at every range session except the "administrative reload." My administrative loading procedures are identical to my out of battery reload.

    I practice one-handed shooting and reloading at every range session as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by djturnz
    At my club they teach that if there is a break in the fighting you should put in a fresh magazine (tactical reload?). How would you do that with a revolver? Do you let live rounds drop?
    You basically have two options.

    1. Dump whatever is in the cylinder, reload and if time allows, recover unfired rounds from the ground.

    2. Open the cylinder while keeping the muzzle pointed at the ground, gently apply pressure to the ejector rod and slightly lift the rounds out of the chambers, pluck out any expended rounds and place fresh rounds in the empty chambers.

    Option #1 works with any reloading device but is slow and I am not a fan of searching for unfired rounds on the ground during a "lull in the fight." Option #2 requires a loading device that allows individual loading of chambers (i.e speed strip, speed slide, dump pouch). On the infrequent occasions that I carry a revolver, I make sure that I have at least one speed strip for just this purpose.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array MR D's Avatar
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    yeah, for revolvers I never change hands to reload under any normal conditions...

    S&W I push the cylinder release with my right thumb, open cylinder by flipping to left or pushing with first two fingers, tilt gun back as I pull speed loader with left hand....mash extractor rod with left hand, dumping empties on floor....
    tilt gun forward line up speed loader and drop in rounds by twisting (HKS) close cylinder...

    (people keep talking about changing hands to reload... confuses me, seems like it would slow the process too much to be effective)

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
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    your left arm is in a cast and you break you trigger finger while diving for cover.....
    Umm nope , i dont practice " duck and cover " anymore either tho so i may well be just quite the oblivious daredevel .
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  14. #14
    Member Array djturnz's Avatar
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    In the class I took, quick revolver loading was discribed as follows:

    Right hand is strong side

    1.With right thumb, activate cylinder release
    2. with the left hand grab under the frame and bring your index and middle finger around to push cylinder out of frame.
    3. use left thumb to press extractor while the right hand reaches for a speedloader.
    4. Install speedloader and close the cylinder. I forget if you transfer the empty speed loader to left hand to put it away or not.

  15. #15
    Member Array Blackhawk6's Avatar
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    That is a technique used for an emergency/speed reload of the revolver. The other, is the one MR. D described earlier.

    Both have their proponents. Neither is wrong. Pick the one you prefer and practice.

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