Training your mindset

This is a discussion on Training your mindset within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; It has been said by many that "One does not rise to the occasion, rather one falls back on their training." Not quoting anyone in ...

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Thread: Training your mindset

  1. #1
    Member Array tomtsr's Avatar
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    Training your mindset

    It has been said by many that "One does not rise to the occasion, rather one falls back on their training." Not quoting anyone in particular since I'm not sure who said it first. There are about 1.5 million hits on Google.

    Almost all trainers place mindset at the very top of the priority list, and no one should doubt that that is where it belongs.

    My question is: Above the training of the gun you use, how to load your gun and clear malfunctions, tactics, shooting skills and such, what measures do you take to obtain the necessary mindset to carry a gun and possibly use it to end the life of another individual?

    I am not bleeding for the BG who's DNA that is being revoked so this is not about whether they deserve dying or not. Nor am I seeking advice on how to "begin" building my own mindset. I have taken care of that already. I'll explain later.

    I am asking what were the training steps you used to gain the mindset that is required to:

    1. Sharpen your decision making skills to act within the 2 seconds before you are killed by an attacker.
    2. Prepare yourself to kill someone by your own hand. If you haven't done this then you should not be carrying a gun.
    3. Develop your awareness to your situation.

    Feel free to add to my list.

    Myself, I began building my mindset when I was in my pre-teens when my neighbor got gunned down in his home, and again when 16 and the elderly couple next door were robbed, shot and eventually died. I know firsthand what it is like to be shot.

    I have taken multiple tactical courses that dealt extensively with mindset, read many books, and talked with many military and LEO's that have experienced firsthand. I am over 50 but have not obtained all there is to know and am certainly still in the learning stages of life.

    The old adage "Train, train, train, and then get more training" is most valuable. I guess, I am looking to glean from my fellow CC family.
    Train like your life depends on it, because it does.

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    I consider only #2 as part of mindset, #1 & 3 are training/practice issues.

    Number 2 is obtained by acquiring and maintaining a mental attitude (mindset) that you will do whatever is necessary to protect you and yours and other actions dictated by your moral position. I am not sure how you do that, other than just do it. It is not a task that all can achieve.

    Number 1 comes from training from SD (gun or MA) schools and followup practice and, if possible experience.

    Number 3 comes from learning the elements of awareness and practcing them.

    A primary method of training and improvement of # 1 & 3 is experience, but that is hard to come by outside the military or LE.
    red13 likes this.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

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    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
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    Well, it all started in Vietnam! My mind has been kind of set ever since! LEO training honed it to a finer state.
    Hiram25
    You can educate ignorance, you can't fix stupid
    Retired DE Trooper, SA XD40 SC, S&W 2" Airweight
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    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    Once I accepted the fact that violence can occur anywhere there are people, then I had to determine what my actions would be in the event that violence affected myself or a family member. I began to think about what the outcome would be if I lost my encounter with that violence and myself or my family member was hurt or killed. I then began to ponder what the outcome would be WHEN I prevailed in counteracting the violence to myself or family member. I began to prepare myself for both outcomes, but concentrating primarily on a "I will survive" attitude. THAT was the beginning of the light bulb growing from dim to bright. In between came training to improve my knowledge and skill and tactics in the pursuit of surviving a violent encounter. Then came more thought on the responsibilities of personal defense, carrying a weapon, and the aftermath of surviving. The effect on my family if I were incarcerated, hurt, hospitilazied, rehab, court, financial, legal. All of these things built upon my mindset. The resulting of "I WILL NOT QUIT, I WILL NOT GIVE UP, I WILL SURVIVE AT ALL COSTS OR DIE TRYING IN DEFENSE OF MYSELF AND MY FAMILY"...Exactly when did all of this mindset begin???...Perhaps when I accepted the responsibility of manhood. JMO
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guantes View Post
    I consider only #2 as part of mindset, #1 & 3 are training/practice issues.

    Number 2 is obtained by acquiring and maintaining a mental attitude (mindset) that you will do whatever is necessary to protect you and yours and other actions dictated by your moral position. I am not sure how you do that, other than just do it. It is not a task that all can achieve.

    Number 1 comes from training from SD (gun or MA) schools and followup practice and, if possible experience.

    Number 3 comes from learning the elements of awareness and practcing them.

    A primary method of training and improvement of # 1 & 3 is experience, but that is hard to come by outside the military or LE.
    This is so right. #2. Some have and some think they have it. Its in your heart and soul, if you have what it takes to defend your life and the lives of your family. Its a personal decision that you and you alone must make. All the training in the world will do you no good, if you cannot do it. The taking of another life can be hard to overcome, even if you are just.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

  7. #6
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    2 generations ago the majority of young men were coming back from WW ll. what they saw and what they did was a part of them and they dealt with it. not alone: cause the trip home by train, boat and more train and bus took 2+ months. time in which they talked among them selves and the chaplains were among them--they 'worked' things out. not all, but the vast majority.
    fast forward to our more recent military actions where by many combatants fly from civilian life to battle in under 48 hours. they have not the time to decompress and thus a major factor of PTSD is created.
    as civilians how we can feel about what may happen; will you freeze or will you act appropriately?

    ever been in a serious auto accident? did you see it coming? did you act to mitigate damage to your self and occupants? after, were you pumped with adrenalin or able to as assist those about you?
    though no guarantee this is how a FOF will go down, it is a good indicator. as for 'are you willing to kill somebody..." it is rather; are you willing to do what is necessary to stop another from harming you and yours even to the point that it may mean their not surviving.

    as for being able to live with yourself after-- a ex-soldier would stop a BG with the same emotions as puttin down a rabid dog: it needed doing. today too many 'help' groups have most everyone thinking that they need the help. i believe most of us have it within ourselves ( and with our god as we believe) to be okay without being sheared at some feel good sewing circle.

    -------------------

    im getting more than a bit peaved going to my anger management classes...
    Be aware, be deliberate in your actions and be accurate.
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    Why do those elected to positions of power than work so hard
    to deny those same opportunities to the same people who empowered them

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    Mindset is very hard to determine until it is put to the real test, in my opinion. I think I have a mindset that will prevail but it has never been tested in real life. Therefore do I really know if I have it.

    The best way I know to train mindset and get experience as a law-abiding CCer is to do FOF with airsoft pistols. You are training your mind to actually shot another living human. While it is not the same as being in a live fire gunfight and shooting people for real it is as clsoe as we can get.

    A DVD that I think helped me is MIND SET - A Lecture On The Three Phases Of The Gunfight - DVD by Gabriel Suarez

    Hope this helps.
    It's gotta be who you are, not a hobby. reinman45

    "Is this persons bad behavior worth me having to kill them over?" Guantes

  9. #8
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    SI has many Great Classes and they are Close Range Gunfighting and Extreme Close Range Gun Fighting. I have taken both in the last year and they are Great. They have skills you need to have to take care of issues that may occur in your lifetime. Call or email SI to see what you are qualified to take. Site is listed above.

    Steve
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    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    Hi Y'all: Once again I agree with Guantes. No.2 is what it is all about; I would preempt the decision and the comment by saying in my case, I thought long and hard about this BEFORE I PURCHASED A FIREARM---does me no good to have spent several hundred dollars and then decide CC is not for me.

  11. #10
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
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    As Gabe pointed out in his book "The Combative Perspective" the term "mindset" is very vague and does not do justice to the necessary mental aspect of the fight. People think that mindset is just awareness and willingness. In my opinion that is less that 10% of the true combative perspective.

    Gabe sets out the combative perspective into four catagories. Inside of each of these four catagories are subcatagories.

    The mental aspect of the fight that people refer to as mindset is much more than just awareness and willingness. Gabes book is 97 pages. Over half of my "Point Shooting Progressions" book is about the mental aspect of the fight.


    Gabe's book is set up as;

    Desire for Victory

    Elimination of Uncertainty

    Situational Awareness

    Willingness to act

    While most of this is covered in Gabe's book we can also consider;

    Know yourself
    Know the adversary
    Know the dynamics of a fight
    Know the correct context of a fight
    Know avoidance, deterence, and de-escalation
    Know that the situation is the dictating factor
    Know the best strategies for your very personal mission
    Know when to apply your wide range of tactics
    Know which skill sets facilitate the best use of your tactics

    Your tactics are worthless without having your head straight.

    Your skill sets are worthless without having your head straight.

    Your equipment is worthless without having your head straight.

    It is the focus on the mental aspect of the fight that makes Suarez International what it is. It is what makes us stand out. It is what makes the student of the art understand that they are at the right place, at the right time.

    Mindset
    Tactics
    Skill sets
    Equipment

    The brain is the ultimate weapon....everything else is just a tool.

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