Shooting skills....real life practices

Shooting skills....real life practices

This is a discussion on Shooting skills....real life practices within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Today I spent most of the day in a "tactical shooting" class that was part of my re-qualification for the Sheriffs Dept that I am ...

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Thread: Shooting skills....real life practices

  1. #1
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    Array HotGuns's Avatar
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    Shooting skills....real life practices

    Today I spent most of the day in a "tactical shooting" class that was part of my re-qualification for the Sheriffs Dept that I am a member of. It was a great class and one that focused on skills the might be encountered while on duty as a police officer. Our training over the years has migrated from standing in front of a B-27 silhouette and punching holes in paper to a much more realistic and dynamic based training that sees lots of movement, lots of different positions and more focus on the use of cover. Things that can actually help you to survive a fire fight.

    As I watched everyone going through the course of fire in groups of 5 or 6 each, I wondered how many people do anything in the way of training that would actually help them to win a defensive encounter with an armed assailant.

    Some of our scenarios were as such...

    From a barricade, standing, shooting from the high, middle and low position...several shots each. Instructors calling out in random order the various positions.

    From a barricade, kneeling, shooting from the high. middle and low postion...several shots each, again Instructors calling the positions.

    From the barricade, prone, various shots. Running up to barricade, dropping to prone and engaging the target through slots in the barricade.

    Running up to the barricade, dropping to prone and shooting from the left side of the barricade.

    All of these fired shots while maintaining minimum exposure.

    Running from the 25 to the 5 and back to the 25. Running from the 25 to the 10 and back to the 25. Running 25 to the 15 and back to the 25. Running from the 25 back to the 5 dropping to a knee and firing several shots.

    Same thing again but this time dropping to prone and firing from the 15.

    An challenging drill that found us all drenched in sweat, and hearing our hearts beat in our ears while trying to maintain shots on target. Much easier said than done. All done to get the heart rate up. It worked.

    Shooting from behind the vehicle from various angles. Over the hood, behind the engine block, feet on the front or back wheel, prone, while shooting under the vehicle.

    Other drills which simulated walking up to a vehicle and drawing and shooting while moving, like when one does a traffic stop and walks up to a vehicle.
    Firing 3 shots, dropping back and moving to cover.

    Lots of reloads while engaging were done. Some drills would require 20 rounds, which meant shooting to slide lock and doing a reload.

    Lots of movement.Lots of rounds fired and most of it done from real world positions. Learning to shoot and move and take advantage of any cover.

    We each shot 250 rounds today and did it in a way that might actually help us should we get into something that no one really wants to, but we know could happen at any time.

    At times our heart rates would have our family doctors seriously concerned, our shirts were soaked through and our pants were filthy and muddy. Thank God for knee pads or they would have been dinged up too.Our hands were tired from working slides, our minds were tired from concentration. It was great and I enjoyed it thoroughly. We all felt like we had a good workout.

    When you train, or practice shooting, are you just punching holes in paper while standing still or are you training in a way that could be beneficial to you?

    Lets hear how you do it. Post it up so that we can see and maybe come up with something that might be of use to us all in the future...and don't be shy.
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  2. #2
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    Sounds like an awesome training set. I unfortunately have never gotten to do any pistol training like that, and most off mine is relegated to square range paper punching for the current time.

    For rifles/LMGs/grenade launchers, its a different story.

    But, lethal encounters don't occur in a comfortable situation. Mr. Murphy always seems to pop up, and ruin any chance of comfort in them. Nothing will be as clear cut as sight alignment, sight picture, and trigger squeeze on a static range. It will be much more chaotic, and dynamic, and your body will do what it has been taught to do, so hopefully it was taught the right thing. Training how you fight, is how you survive a lethal encounter. Sounds like your department is serious about their training, which is a great thing.
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  3. #3
    Member Array Cattus Vir's Avatar
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    Hotguns I have the same training for my job. a lot of them are just as you described and a few that are more thinking than physical. I like the 3 card flip (9 targets 9 cards flip 3 random cards and put 2 shots in each of the three and repeat twice) and about the same thing starting from a seated position with 6 targets but seated. The range master hits the buzzer and yells 3 numbers the you stand, turn and double tap each of the numbers he/she called out.
    We do 9 stations three times a year plus rapid deployment drills at least three times a year. They use some funky time versus accuracy scoring that I can't figure out..yet but we have to score 85% average over the all the drills. I really enjoy the rapid deployment drills since I my work is in a bio-defense lab setting.
    We have the ICE (swat team) local Police and fire Dept come in as well and drill mass casualty, bio-hazard and run and shoots/hostage situations as well. Watching the ICE team work is like watching a well oiled machine, those guys don't miss a beat.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    Today I spent most of the day in a "tactical shooting" class that was part of my re-qualification for the Sheriffs Dept that I am a member of. It was a great class and one that focused on skills the might be encountered while on duty as a police officer. Our training over the years has migrated from standing in front of a B-27 silhouette and punching holes in paper to a much more realistic and dynamic based training that sees lots of movement, lots of different positions and more focus on the use of cover. Things that can actually help you to survive a fire fight.

    As I watched everyone going through the course of fire in groups of 5 or 6 each, I wondered how many people do anything in the way of training that would actually help them to win a defensive encounter with an armed assailant.

    Some of our scenarios were as such...

    From a barricade, standing, shooting from the high, middle and low position...several shots each. Instructors calling out in random order the various positions.

    From a barricade, kneeling, shooting from the high. middle and low postion...several shots each, again Instructors calling the positions.

    From the barricade, prone, various shots. Running up to barricade, dropping to prone and engaging the target through slots in the barricade.

    Running up to the barricade, dropping to prone and shooting from the left side of the barricade.

    All of these fired shots while maintaining minimum exposure.

    Running from the 25 to the 5 and back to the 25. Running from the 25 to the 10 and back to the 25. Running 25 to the 15 and back to the 25. Running from the 25 back to the 5 dropping to a knee and firing several shots.

    Same thing again but this time dropping to prone and firing from the 15.

    An challenging drill that found us all drenched in sweat, and hearing our hearts beat in our ears while trying to maintain shots on target. Much easier said than done. All done to get the heart rate up. It worked.

    Shooting from behind the vehicle from various angles. Over the hood, behind the engine block, feet on the front or back wheel, prone, while shooting under the vehicle.

    Other drills which simulated walking up to a vehicle and drawing and shooting while moving, like when one does a traffic stop and walks up to a vehicle.
    Firing 3 shots, dropping back and moving to cover.

    Lots of reloads while engaging were done. Some drills would require 20 rounds, which meant shooting to slide lock and doing a reload.

    Lots of movement.Lots of rounds fired and most of it done from real world positions. Learning to shoot and move and take advantage of any cover.

    We each shot 250 rounds today and did it in a way that might actually help us should we get into something that no one really wants to, but we know could happen at any time.

    At times our heart rates would have our family doctors seriously concerned, our shirts were soaked through and our pants were filthy and muddy. Thank God for knee pads or they would have been dinged up too.Our hands were tired from working slides, our minds were tired from concentration. It was great and I enjoyed it thoroughly. We all felt like we had a good workout.

    When you train, or practice shooting, are you just punching holes in paper while standing still or are you training in a way that could be beneficial to you?

    Lets hear how you do it. Post it up so that we can see and maybe come up with something that might be of use to us all in the future...and don't be shy.
    Count me fortunate, I do this twice a year with our local PD. Everything you said we were doing, but this past April they put in an active shooter course. Talk about getting the heart rate up. Go from the 10 yard line sprinting to the 75 yard line, put your AR back together, hit the 50 yard line in one of the positions trained with, then to the 35 yard line, then the 25 yard line, then the 15 yard line, drop your primary for a shotgun, load and unload on the steals, then put together your pistol and start moving in again. Once is fun, but we did it about 10 times through out the day. It was as good as the magpul classes. I had bruises on my hips from my pistol, mags, and my knife. I will say this it WAS GREAT. With officer fatalities on the rise, they are taking it to heart. Im glad you brought this up. Thanks for sharing.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

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  5. #5
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    My favorites are the disarming techniques, in a situation where the perp has the drop on you. From the front and the rear. Even though there is no actual shooting live rounds, it does present a possible scenario and an option instead of just being at the total mercy of someone.

    We practice closing with and making physical contact with an armed subject who is going for a weapon. Sometimes it is quicker, within a certain distance to gain physical control of a person than attempt to draw and engage.
    I like training that you described mixed with these. It gives options, and options are always a good thing.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array ks kid's Avatar
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    I went thru a similar type of training yesterday also. We also did a lot shooting at bad breath distance, two person drills and ended the class with FOF. Longest shooting was done at 50 yds in prone. One thing we did that I had not before was walking backwards, tripping over a hazard then putting rounds on target from your back. Lots of realistic shooting positions and situations. I can feel it today, a little sore and stiff. We shot close to 400 rds, it was a good day. Getting the heart and breath rate up makes a big difference in your shooting ability.

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