shooting/training question

shooting/training question

This is a discussion on shooting/training question within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am having a problem shooting my 9mm with both eyes open it takes me a long time to line up my front sight. I ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array russ1986's Avatar
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    shooting/training question

    I am having a problem shooting my 9mm with both eyes open it takes me a long time to line up my front sight. I know with practice i will be able to do with out thinking but does anyone have any pointers
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    JD
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    Which eye is your dominant eye? If you are cross dominant (your dominant eye does not correspond to your dominant hand) you can have issues shooting with two eyes open. If you don't know what your dominant eye is, find out

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    Member Array russ1986's Avatar
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    I am right eye dominate and i am right hand dominate
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    JD
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    Quote Originally Posted by russ1986 View Post
    I am right eye dominate and i am right hand dominate
    Well that's good, at least you don't have to worry about that. What kind of sights does your gun have? I've found that a wider rear notch helps out immensely.

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    Member Array russ1986's Avatar
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    I have a sig p250 with standard night sights they came with the firearm
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    OK, and are you right-handed?

    Back to basics. Rear sight, front sight and target - you've got three objects at different distances to line up. If you have young enough eyes, you might get two out of the three in focus. Us old f***ts deal with presbyopia (old age eyes) and we're happy to get one in sharp focus.

    In light of being a 25+ year mediocre handgunner, I can't emphasize enough FRONT SIGHT. Slow it down, don't worry about the double taps, just load one round, bring the gun up onto the target, and focus on the front sight! The target will be fuzzy, but clear enough so you'll know whether you're aiming for center of mass or the head. Fire your shot, and assess.

    Also, to get into the 'groove', start with your target at maybe 7 or 10 yards. Keep it there for as many practice sessions as it takes to hit where you're aiming (plus or minus a couple of inches) 85 to 90% of the time. Then push your target out another 5 yards and work to the same standard. When you can keep all your shots on a paper plate at 25 yards you're probably as good as you need to be with accuracy, so then push to work on speed next.
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    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    blank piece of cardboard notebook size at 25'
    draw a 8"circle and put two x's on the circle at 10 an 2 oclock.
    put a dark spot in the center, lower third--like a 'o' where the mouth would be on a face
    sight your gun on one of the x's and sweep it slowly through the O to the other X
    do this a few times and unloaded time the trigger/hammer to fall when the sight is crossing the O

    add ammo and continue this slowly for a box of ammo.
    slow is the key, each shot is a new event. forget how many in the mag.
    go to low ready between shots


    so--from low ready you are going to raise the gun and focusing on the x put the front sight
    on an X and than sweep down onto the O when the hammer falls and the
    front sight continues on to the far side x:
    10pm to O to 2 pm and vary it--
    2pm to O to 10pm

    concentrate on dominate eye on the x & the O &the x allowing the front sight to pass through
    these 3 points in space. and the hammer falls on the O.
    practice dry firing only enough to feel that the hammer is falling on the O, than go to the range with ammo.

    let me know how this aspect of your potential solution works out.

    key is you are focusing on the target, not the front sight--think about it; you already know what the sight looks like, you just need to get it in the area you want the bullet to go: look there.
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    Quote Originally Posted by claude clay View Post
    key is you are focusing on the target, not the front sight--think about it; you already know what the sight looks like, you just need to get it in the area you want the bullet to go: look there.
    good luck
    Not sure where you picked that technique up from. Sounds very interesting and a bit against conventional wisdom (not that that is necessarily bad.. just saying). Care to share where this technique originated?

    To the OP:

    Your question was specifically about lining up your sights quickly. Like almost everything else in the gun community there will be debate as to whether or not that's even necessary on a defensive firearm. There are those who claim point shooting is the only way to go, those who advocate a "muzzle on meat" kind of sighting system, those who say you should look at your target only and those who say you have to look at the front sight.

    I say you should try them all and adopt what works for you provided you are honest with yourself.

    I MOSTLY advocate front sight focus. I've heard all of the arguments for other types of shooting and practice and, for me, I get the best accuracy when I concentrate on the front sight. It allows the target to be fuzzy but distinguishable and the rear sights to be fuzzy but alignable.

    I, too, have experienced sighting difficulties on some guns especially (as JD said) if they have a very narrow rear notch. Those types of sights are great for extreme accuracy but not that great for fast acquisition of the front sight.

    One of the best methods I have been taught and learned and implemented in my own life that has helped with fast sight alignment is my draw.

    Draw the firearm to low ready in front of the chest and get a good, two-handed grip on it. As you push it straight out toward the target the first thing your eyes should pick up in your peripheral vision as your firearm comes forward is your front sight. Immediately shift focus to it as your push it out to your target and the rear will likely line up perfectly if your grip is as it should be. You will naturally adjust to keep that front sight in view. Start slow and work up speed and if your non-dominant eye gets in the way or fights for dominance (I am ambidextrously dominant in my eyes and sometimes my left eye will try to take over) try squinting it or closing it for a few draws to see if it makes a difference.

    If it does become exceptionally frustrating you can switch out your sights for something that gives the front sight more dominance such as your XS Big Dot sights or even something that has a wider rear notch in which to float your front sight.

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    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    JD, I am having that cross dominant problem, how do I overcome it?
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    JD
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    JD, I am having that cross dominant problem, how do I overcome it?
    PM inbound.

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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    ^ Actually, JD and INccwchris, would you guys mind sharing?

    I'm cross-dominant, too, and with pistols, two-handed or strong-hand, I simply shift my sighting plane over to my dominant eye.

    With my shotgun, I've actually had to go with an optic.

    I don't really have a problem with my AR, since I'm either using the optic (a red-dot/holographic at no-magnification), or closing one eye to align the irons for longer shots.

    I'd like to see if there are any techniques which I'm unaware of, and can make use of.

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    Member Array russ1986's Avatar
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    my shooting is decent. what i am trying to do is become good with both eyes open. i having a hard time finding my front sight with
    both eyes open quickly. I was wondering tips on that. I have been doing just practice pull and aim in my house. taking an empty mag throwing it in the firearm and then aiming at an object in my house like a light socket. I have just been wondering of any tips to be able to find my front sight faster with both eyes open. it takes me roughly 10seconds or more to find it
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    Okay.. I wrestled my husband into being a model for me. I have to give him credit. He is left eye dominant so I had to do some adjusting to get him to sight with his right eye but I think we got it..lol.

    Alright, hopefully this helps illustrate what I was trying to say:

    1. Draw the firearm to low ready in front of the chest and get a good, two-handed grip on it.





    As you can see the firearm is oriented toward the target and mostly flat. If you HAD to shoot from here it would be possible and you'd likely hit very close to where you were intending to shoot, especially at the close distances you'd be required to shoot from in this position.

    2. As you push it straight out toward the target the first thing your eyes should pick up in your peripheral vision as your firearm comes forward is your front sight.





    My husband has the front sight of his firearm painted red to catch his eye quickly. Having a different colored front sight can be helpful if you want quick sight pickup visually. Again, if forced to fire from this position you would still be "on target." Concentrate on the front sight and keep pressing straight out.

    3. As your push it out to your target, the rear sight will likely line up perfectly if your grip is as it should be and you are steadily concentrating on the front sight. The rear sight should kind of snap up behind and around the front as it's being pushed straight out. You will naturally adjust to keep that front sight in view. Start slow and work up speed and if your non-dominant eye gets in the way or fights for dominance (I am ambidextrously dominant in my eyes and sometimes my left eye will try to take over) try squinting it or closing it for a few draws to see if it makes a difference.





    Hope that helps.

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    JD
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSiWRX View Post
    ^ Actually, JD and INccwchris, would you guys mind sharing?

    I'm cross-dominant, too, and with pistols, two-handed or strong-hand, I simply shift my sighting plane over to my dominant eye.

    With my shotgun, I've actually had to go with an optic.

    I don't really have a problem with my AR, since I'm either using the optic (a red-dot/holographic at no-magnification), or closing one eye to align the irons for longer shots.

    I'd like to see if there are any techniques which I'm unaware of, and can make use of.
    Pm sent.
    Last edited by JD; June 22nd, 2011 at 03:15 PM.

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    VIP Member Array paaiyan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by russ1986 View Post
    I have just been wondering of any tips to be able to find my front sight faster with both eyes open. it takes me roughly 10seconds or more to find it
    10 seconds? That's a very long time indeed. If you quickly bring up the gun to sight, and do it repeatedly, have you noticed if the sights always tend to be off in a particular direction? As in, when sighting quickly do you always have to swing it to the right or always to the left to line it up?
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