Martial arts for self defense. - Page 4

Martial arts for self defense.

This is a discussion on Martial arts for self defense. within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Think I'll stick to BJJ....

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  1. #46
    Member Array redstgunnut's Avatar
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    Think I'll stick to BJJ.


  2. #47
    Member Array gruntingfrog's Avatar
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    I found this YouTube channel for Gary Boaz and watching these videos is really cementing my decision. I will be seeking Aikido classes soon. Watching him progress through the moves showing how the uke's balance is affected along the way really helps me see how affective this really can be.

    YouTube - kyushoaikiguy's Channel

    Thanks everybody for your input, and thanks for letting me hijack your thread, Adric22!

    Edit:
    I just watched the video on Katate Tori Sankyo and when he said, "cross the pinky behind the ring finger," I decided to see what that felt like so I tried it on myself. HOLY $%#! THAT HURTS!

    I will never doubt the demonstrations where it looks like they're just leading them around by the hand again.
    Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face.
    - Mike Tyson

  3. #48
    Member Array ranburr's Avatar
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    I have taken a number of classes that dealt specifically with disarm tactics. Never learned what I saw in the video and don't believe that those shown here would work anywhere in the real world.

  4. #49
    Ex Member Array G19inLV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redstgunnut View Post
    Think I'll stick to BJJ.
    BJJ is good, it has it's limitations like any art, but it serves a purpose.

  5. #50
    Ex Member Array G19inLV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gruntingfrog View Post
    I found this YouTube channel for Gary Boaz and watching these videos is really cementing my decision. I will be seeking Aikido classes soon. Watching him progress through the moves showing how the uke's balance is affected along the way really helps me see how affective this really can be.

    YouTube - kyushoaikiguy's Channel

    Thanks everybody for your input, and thanks for letting me hijack your thread, Adric22!

    Edit:
    I just watched the video on Katate Tori Sankyo and when he said, "cross the pinky behind the ring finger," I decided to see what that felt like so I tried it on myself. HOLY $%#! THAT HURTS!

    I will never doubt the demonstrations where it looks like they're just leading them around by the hand again.
    Gary Boaz is great, very fluid and good movement. Keep in mind, it will take a long time to look anything like Gary Boaz. You have to stick with it and practice, practice, practice. For the first year of Aikido, I wanted to quit every other second. But I have a cousin who is a Nidan (2nd degree), and I have seen him use Aikido in a real situation. That is what kept me going. Aikido can be very frustrating for a beginner, you just have to stick with it.

  6. #51
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    Keep all things in perspective :

    Shaolin Pepsi - Video
    I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. --- Will Rogers ---
    Chief Justice John Roberts : "I don't see how you can read Heller and not take away from it the notion that the Second Amendment...was extremely important to the framers in their view of what liberty meant."

  7. #52
    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    Think I'll stick to BJJ.
    It's probably not a good idea to "stick" with any particular style or system. Most people I know have a base or foundation they build upon.

    For example, a striker might focus mostly on boxing or karate, but add a weapons style, a grappling art, on top of that to fill in gaps. Because just like CCW handguns, all arts have their strengths and weaknesses.

    Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) proved itself quite effective in UFC fighting. It's a great grappling style and matches well with the observation that most fights, if they go on long enough, will eventually go "to the ground." Expert groundfighters have an advantage there.

    On the other hand, if you're, say, in a bar and a fight breaks out, you might not want to be rolling around on the floor at all. A striking art might have a better chance of handling a multiple-attacker scenario. All that said, Krav Maga is a very well-rounded system that has few weak areas in this regard.

    Where Krav is a bit lacking is in its ability to scale depth of attack and defense. It's very much a full-on, go 100-percent all-out kind of thing. If you're at a party or such, and your friend is getting drunk and belligerent, you might want to put him in a joint lock and ease him outside. That's where a soft style like Aikido or similar will really shine.

    In the short run, it's a good idea to start with something - anything - and get comfortable fighting, shoving, throwing people and being thrown. Good to learn how to strike and kick. If you're up close with someone, good to be able to gain enough distance to bring your gun into play if needed.

    Later, you can think about rounding out your technique.
    Hopyard, limatunes and atctimmy like this.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  8. #53
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    It is imperative for any able bodied gun owner to cross train in some reality based unarmed self-defense, including use of improvised weapons, in case using a gun may not be practical. And there may be some places you may not be allowed to carry a gun.

  9. #54
    Senior Member Array Cold Shot's Avatar
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    Boxing rules the street. Slipping and weaving and staying on your feet are all important in a fight. Being able to throw good hard punches is even more important.

    I am much less inclined to pull my gun on somebody if I am confident I can handle it with my fists. That means I probably don't have to deal with cops, judges, lawyers, and juries.

    Also, lift heavy weights.

  10. #55
    Ex Member Array JDlewis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Shot View Post
    Boxing rules the street. Slipping and weaving and staying on your feet are all important in a fight. Being able to throw good hard punches is even more important.

    I am much less inclined to pull my gun on somebody if I am confident I can handle it with my fists. That means I probably don't have to deal with cops, judges, lawyers, and juries.

    Also, lift heavy weights.
    True but boxers are only good at throw there hands and if you get a boxers agains aikido. Boxer may not do so good. Were if you know a few different styles it help out in many different ways were I know tea kwon do. And I'm going to start taking aikido it will help in many way being able to be good with your hands and feet.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #56
    Member Array redstgunnut's Avatar
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    When I said I'd stick with BJJ, I meant as opposed to Aikido.

    I do cross train in other disciplines, including stand up fighting.

  12. #57
    Distinguished Member Array AZJD1968's Avatar
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    Since 2005, I have been training in Kenpo karate, Muy Thai Kickboxing and Jiu Jitsu. Integrating them into MMA. Makes for well rounded training and I highly recommend Martial Arts for self defense. Just as important as them teaching you how to handle yourself in a self defense (hand to hand) confrontations, they also teach you the mindset, awareness and life techniques that will keep you from getting into unwanted situations.

    I feel that my MA as well as my firearm training has become an invaluable part of my daily routine. Again, I highly recommend it.
    Stop whining and go do something that makes a difference!
    If you think that I may be talking to you, then I am.

  13. #58
    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    I have a background in Tae Kwon Do, and Karate. A boxer wouldn't have much chance against a master in either of those arts since they use four striking tools instead of two. Don't limit yourself to hands or feet. MMA classes are starting up in my area and Army Combatives is the new big thing. Kind thinking about taking it
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

  14. #59
    Member Array ranburr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    I have a background in Tae Kwon Do, and Karate. A boxer wouldn't have much chance against a master in either of those arts since they use four striking tools instead of two. Don't limit yourself to hands or feet. MMA classes are starting up in my area and Army Combatives is the new big thing. Kind thinking about taking it
    I would have to disagree with you here. We used to train against the S.Korean special forces and we literally beat the crap out of them. It was so bad that they eventually refused to go hand to hand with us. These guys were all serious blackbelts in tae kwon do.

  15. #60
    VIP Member Array gottabkiddin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPro.40 View Post
    My son is traditional Taekwando for the last 12 years now. He is now acheived a second degree Edon black belt. I'm grateful for the teaching and the wisdom generated by Master Belvins to teach him he cannot stop bullets with his teeth. Wisdom is also a part of the teachings.
    Isn't that the truth.... How'd the old sayin go... Karate is neat, but not at ten feet.
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." Luke 22:36

    "If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so." Thomas Jefferson

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