Personal training as part of your defensive training?

Personal training as part of your defensive training?

This is a discussion on Personal training as part of your defensive training? within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; So how many of you do a personal physical training routine as part of your tactical self defense training? Maybe do a quick run down ...

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    Member Array hdsteve69's Avatar
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    Personal training as part of your defensive training?

    So how many of you do a personal physical training routine as part of your tactical self defense training? Maybe do a quick run down of your routine if you do.(I hope I put this in the right place)


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    I don't necessarily do it "as part of my tactical self defense training" but rather as part of my overall health and under the understanding that physical fitness (or at least tone and readiness) does have a huge advantage in ALL walks of life, including, of course, self defense.

    I'm a pretty regular Yoga practitioner. I took some time off for the remodeling of our house and being pregnant has sucked some of the motivation out of me but I'm eager to get back to it and am currently suffering some VERY sore muscles from my Saturday Yoga class. I also love to swim but the last year + has been nothing but Yoga. Right before I found out I was pregnant I started doing a core class twice a week in addition to my Yoga but stopped when the morning sickness got too bad.

    Yoga, three times a week, has given me a lot of tone and stability and tons of flexibility but I want more muscle mass. I want to start working especially on my upper body strength and, once this second baby is born, start working my core hard again.

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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Look at your training as a pyramid. At the bottom of the pyramid is what is called 'base training'. This is, unfortunately, the daily grind of getting out there and improving and maintaining your cardio-vascular system. Without some C-V training, you run the risk of 'gassing' and being unable to fight. In addition, the improved oxygen delivery and improved circulation powers all your other systems and gives you the 'urge' to train, and it gives you the ability to access your aggressiveness, even if that aggro is used to run away (and then, maybe turn and fight).

    On top of that, somewhere, a layer of skill and experience and appropriate training lies. The training has to be functional, or functionalize your moves. This means it has to be learned and made part of you under some stress. You fight like you train.

    So, I think a martial art, combined with some combat pistol craft, coupled with a layer of base training can be an effective vehicle from which to apply the right solution in a SHTF situation. Of course even an experienced person can 'gas' - you see it in the UFC - the guy actually forgets to breathe, and has an adrenaline dump which leaves him helpless. You don't want to have solved a SD situation, then have the 'end stage' jitters and feeling faint and turn and suddenly the 'rest of the story' is coming at you.

    So part of your combat pistolcraft has to be:
    1. Surveying the area after you double/triple tap by looking around, HG in defensive ready;
    2. Always reload after you shoot so you're not standing there with an empty gun;
    3. Make sure the threat is ended and stay alert;
    4. Have the physical conditioning and stress training to help survive the adrenaline dump.

    One way to do this which can augment your training and preparedness is to have a partner who also carries. This is why it is not only a good idea, but CRUCIAL for the husband and wife to train together and both carry. Two sets of eyes, ears and SA are far more effective, probably 10x as effective as a single person trying to handle a SD situation. You can assign tasks, you can cover each other, you can have redundancy in your equipment (two cell phone, two flashlights, two OC sprays, two HGs, and so forth). You will almost never be out and both of you forget a crucial element of gear (like a magazine, lol).

    I've been out to the range and somehow put a mag in my HG with just two bullets (and one in the chamber) and carried it around for several days. Same with charging your phone, batteries in your tac light dead (I had mine turned on in my pocket one time). Others have reported a HG which was inoperable due to a small mech problem. With a partner, as in my case, she had a HG and a BUG and was with me. It might even be a good idea for each member of the team to have one loaded mag for their partner's gun stashed somewhere (purse, pocket, backpack), which would work for the BUG (little Kel-Tec/LCP mag is a skinny nothing, for example. Curses on Ruger for not making their mags compatible, BTW).

    So a partner is better than a BUG by several orders of magnitude, IMO. (just work on not sweeping or shooting each other, and covering each other, rather than huddling together, form a crossfire deployment, learn to help each other get in the car while supplying cover and so forth).

    Just some random ideas. FWIW.

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    As part of overall health I'm running, 3 miles every other day. I'm also doing light dumbbell work combined with situps, push ups, bicycle, etc. on the running off days for tone. I'm also looking at starting Krav Maga training in the fall. In the winter I may join a gym to use the treadmills and may incorporate some weight training then.
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    I still do my Marine Corps PT- good for you, good for me, ooh rah!
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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    OK, here's me at age 60, the shape I'm in due to my regimen is pretty obvious by my biking bibs and jersey, lol.



    Having been a hobbyist bodybuilder I actually had to lose some muscle mass in my upper body.

    My partner, also 60:



    Good job on those realizing that staying in shape is a key factor. Obviously not everyone can be that physical at advanced ages, but you just find ways to work around your limitations as best you can.

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    Ex Member Array jtmoose's Avatar
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    Fitness training is more important than the gun you carry in my opinion. It is at the base of the personal/family safety and security pyramid.

    I still think calisthenics is very versatile and effective but I get bored with it. An olympic weight set and doing the olympic lifts is a top notch fitness regimen too. A little of both: I could see a kettlebell to do a little of everything and do it well. I stopped all running and lifting weights for over a year and only did kettlebell. When I started running and lifting weights again, everything was better than when I left off. My kettlebells are staples in my life because they can do everything well and take up so little space. LifelineUSA :: Kettlebells - Strength - Products or http://www.dragondoor.com/

    I'll +1 limatunes because my flexability sucks after a bunch of injuries and yoga helps a lot with everyday moving around.

    A lot of my buddies really like crossfit but I can't get into it. I do really like the randomness because it prevents boredom. A "fitdeck" can accomplish that too though. FitDeck Exercise Playing Cards

    Long story short, get a kettlebell and a couple fitdecks (i.e. yoga, bodyweight, kettlebell, etc.)

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    Member Array hdsteve69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastk9dad View Post
    As part of overall health I'm running, 3 miles every other day. I'm also doing light dumbbell work combined with situps, push ups, bicycle, etc. on the running off days for tone. I'm also looking at starting Krav Maga training in the fall. In the winter I may join a gym to use the treadmills and may incorporate some weight training then.
    I have been thinking about starting the krav maga training also ,my wife did some of it in the police academy and I went with her one day to a police gym to meet the guy that started that training with the police and watch cadets practice,it seems to be a very usefull tool in self defense, I mean it must be if leo is training and using it. I just started back up at the gym doing 20 min on the treadmill then doin alot of core stuff right now once I have my core strength back I will do some basic weight training to stay tone and strong but not get to big. I also do some bicycling and alot of walking around lakes while fishing.

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    Free weights for over 30 years now. It does wonders for conditioning explosive force, and doctors are still marveling at the health side-benefits.
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    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Free weights is really the 'king of exercises' but there is some potential for getting injuries. Next, imo, is road biking, fluid training (stationary biking), because there is a range of intensity available (hills, gearing), you can do it everyday, even twice a day, so high consistency and high session count. If you ride 2x a day for 7 days, that's 14 sessions (even if they're 20-30 minutes) in a week, 56 sessions a month, and potentially 500-600 sessions per year. Contrast that with 3x/week free weights (which is more intense and longer lasting post event), which only adds up to 144 sessions per year. Now, nobody is 7x /week consistent, we get colds, have appointments, but the point is cycling allows more sessions and quicker recovery than any other exercise regime and more people clock from 3500 to several thousand miles per year (the pros).

    To put a fine point on it, cycling and my base training has really reversed the effects of time - it keeps you young. (Paradoxically, at the Pro level, guys who ride the Tour de France are prematurely aged - they ask too much of their systems).

    Anyway, more random thoughts on base training.

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    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    I do mainly functional strength training with "8 to Hate" calisthenics, barbells, sandbags, kettlebells, and the Bowflex machine. I also run about 4-6 miles (sometimes w/ a weight vest or on hilly areas) and also do drills on the heavybag, double-end bag, and Muay Thai pads. I also jump rope and occasionally use the elliptical machine.

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    Member Array Ishmael's Avatar
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    This article has me interested in trying a routine of the basic free weights again: Everything You Know About Fitness is a Lie*|*Men’s Journal

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    fm2
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    The Starting Strength book, by Rippetoe is very good. I have been working with an Olympic lifting coach and that has helped a great deal. I've learned how to better balance and move quicker under load. I am also doing some road work once a week for 1.5 hrs. Next, I am going to up my cardio work.

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    Senior Member Array Cold Shot's Avatar
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    Lift heavy weights. Deads, Squats, Presses, Pullups, Rows.

    Boxing for cardio. If you can find a decent gym, I would highly recommend it. I would argue that boxers are the most highly conditioned athletes in the world. I was an all-American swimmer back in the day, and boxing is tougher cardio.

    It will also teach you self defense like nothing else in my opinion. Boxing rules the street. Other stuff can be incorporated into a system, like some martial arts, but boxing is a great foundation.

    I'm not talking about some chromed up health club with "boxing" classes, either. You have to find one of those old school places that's dark and smelly and will let you spar.

    Unfortunately, most of the people on this site wouldn't be caught in those places with anything less than an AR-15.
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    New Member Array pipermac's Avatar
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    Freeweights - cardio - standard PT for over 20 years. As for running out of gas - if you use any of the training breathing techniques that are taught in various disciplines then you should be fine. Forgetting to breath during stress is natural. Remember, we have all trained to do things that are unnatural. Pathfinder Robinson always said it was totally "unnatural" to jump from a perfectly good airplane!

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