Benefits of IDPA

Benefits of IDPA

This is a discussion on Benefits of IDPA within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I recently joined IDPA at my local range and am curious how many of you are also members. If so, what do you feel are ...

View Poll Results: Are you an IDPA member?

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  • Yes, it's OK.

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Thread: Benefits of IDPA

  1. #1
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    Benefits of IDPA

    I recently joined IDPA at my local range and am curious how many of you are also members. If so, what do you feel are the biggest benefits of IDPA? Do you feel it has made you a better shooter?

    Please vote.


  2. #2
    Member Array Azchief's Avatar
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    I definately can see the benefits versus just standing still and shooting at a target on a regular range. I hope to find some IDPA matches or steel challenges to try in my area throughout this next year. Really would like to work on draw and shooting on the move/at targets that move as well as reloads while inder pressure.

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    Senior Member Array GentlemanJim's Avatar
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    Voted other.

    It's fun and for those who take it seriously it adds a little stress to the shooting experience. I see people who are there primarily for the competition ingraining bad habits though.

    Jim
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    A regular IDPA shooter is better than a once every blue moon defensive shooting school attendee.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

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    Member Array rick21's Avatar
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    Other. I'm guessing that by benefits you mean developing self defense skills. IDPA is ok for familiarization and building stance, sighting, grip and trigger press skills. How those skills apply to a gunfight depends on the gunfight.

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    Senior Member Array bbqgrill's Avatar
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    IDPA is a good opportunity to practice presenting a firearm from your holster, it is also a lot of fun.
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    Cool! Sounds like we have a consensus, worth a shot (no pun intended). Thanks :)

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    Senior Member Array Bubbiesdad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azchief View Post
    I definately can see the benefits versus just standing still and shooting at a target on a regular range. I hope to find some IDPA matches or steel challenges to try in my area throughout this next year. Really would like to work on draw and shooting on the move/at targets that move as well as reloads while inder pressure.
    This^

    This, I shoot IDPA and USPSA. It is a chance for trigger time and working on drawing skills. But defensive training is completely different.
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    Anything that makes you move, shoot, reload and think under pressure is a good thing.

    Skills learned here can certainly be transferred over to a SD type setting. Just dont get so caught up in the rules/procedures you forget why you are there, not to win the match but to learn.
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  10. #10
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    Senior Member Array MJK's Avatar
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    I am an IDPA safety officer and have had a lot of match experience, both as an SO and a participant. IMO IDPA offers a great opportunity to learn fundamental SD skills. BUT it is not SD training. For example, rarely do you shoot a CoF (course of fire) where you have to worry about an assault from the rear. Often the courses are excessively complicated or unrealistic. Still, if supplemented with a good force-on-force course IDPA offers a lot.

    Just my $0.02

  11. #11
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    Lightbulb IDPA is good, defensive trigger time…

    Tactics & Strategies aside, I always looked at it as a test bed for shooting techniques. Shooting techniques are quite measurable, that’s why we have scoring rings on the target and electronic (impulse) timers.

    Further, if there is anything wrong with you, your gun, holster, mags, magazine pouches or even your cover garment, you’ll find out at the match. And the best part is that you get to go home after wards (as opposed to the hospital or morgue ).

    It may not be Force on Force with Resisting Opponents and Simunitions, but for many, it’s the ONLY training they will ever get.

    So, don’t go there to win, go there to learn something about yourself and your gear. It'll be a lot more fun and you'll get to meet some good, like minded folks.
    Last edited by DRM; December 13th, 2011 at 08:46 AM.
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    It's great to help with your shooting skills,but, be careful not to let some of its tactics become "muscle memory",i've seen seasoned shooters get caught up in the double tap and not even realize they are doing it.
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    It's a good time regardless...I sure as heck don't go there to "win" anything (I'm just not that good or fast anymore) but it does give one some range time shooting while doing something other than just stand there and shoot at a bullseye. I still work on stationary stuff as well as I feel the need to have a good base to begin from and build upon.
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    In IDPA you are limited to 18 rounds max, plus a maximum of 2 no shoot targets per course of fire with limitations on when to reload and why. When you go take a Gun Fighting Course (like the 2-3 day courses out on the web) you will be on a 360 degree range and the old firing limitations do not apply and you are not be limited to a 10+1 bullets in the gun issue which IDPA has. I also shoot IPSC and carry as much ammo when needed on my belt to compete with and when I CCW I have a minimum of 36 rounds of ammo on me. The 10+1 issue is no longer valid except in states that I will not live in. Both of these gun games are good to do, but I prefer to have a fully loaded gun to shoot with and fully loaded mags to reload and no issues when the reload occurs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tts View Post
    I recently joined IDPA at my local range and am curious how many of you are also members. If so, what do you feel are the biggest benefits of IDPA? Do you feel it has made you a better shooter?
    Have been shooting IDPA fairly regularly for a couple of years and have shot 1/2 dozen USPSA matches as well. The biggest benefits FOR ME are as follows, and I'll explain more after I list 'em:

    1) Shooting under stress,
    2) Shooting when you have to vs when you please,
    3) Shooting while moving and while paying attention to cover
    4) You learn your weapon

    1. I experience quite a bit of adrenaline, nerves and some anxiety. So I'm learning to retain focus under this stress--where's the threat, where am I, use the sights, take the shot, be quick about it. None of this is experienced at the range.

    2. You're on the clock, there's a threat, and to do well you have no time to reflect on stuff--not the sights, the grip, the stance, the trigger press. You take the shot. You have to be calling your shots on distant targets, too, or you'll be wasting time. That's good experience--you can't hit a button to pull that target up to see if you hit it. You can and should call your shots at the range and of course you can use a timer. But it's not the same.

    3. Maybe the most important experience I get: shooting on the move. Likewise, having to consider your exposure to a threat and reduce or eliminate that exposure adds at least some element of thinking you don't get at the range. When I learned in training then at IDPA matches that yes, you CAN get good hits while moving, it was a whole new universe of shooting. Quite a thrill, actually.

    4. Like the difference between practicing exercises on your guitar at home and playing live with 4 other folks, 'live' definitely is where you learn your instrument. It's just astonishing how much that weapon's handling and performance means when you don't have time to think about it--AT ALL. Clearing a malfunction at a match doesn't mean your life, but it will hone your ability to not dik around and get it done.

    To sum it all up: LOTS more external stuff to think about--all simultaneously. Not just 'hit that target', but where's the target, and where's the next one? Not just find the next target and shoot it, but move to position without tripping over something. Not just shoot everything sight, but DON'T SHOOT stuff that's maybe NOT in sight. And...do it fast.

    It's not tactical training, it's not force-on-force and it has several goofy rules that we could argue forever about.
    I believe it is FAR better than simply squaring off against a piece of non-moving paper and plinking away.
    Combined with defensive pistol training it makes for about as prepared a shooter as the average person can be, I think.

    I'm no whiz at this--I shoot CDP division as 'Marksman' and ESP division as 'Sharpshooter', so, lots to learn. OTOH, I've drawn and fired my weapon under stress and have consistently gotten hits a few hundred times more than had I never bothered to do IDPA. I've fired weak hand and strong hand only when I really needed to make the hits, from behind cover, in very uncomfortable positions many dozens of times more than otherwise. And have proven to myself it can be done.

    Quote Originally Posted by glockrocker View Post
    It's great to help with your shooting skills,but, be careful not to let some of its tactics become "muscle memory",i've seen seasoned shooters get caught up in the double tap and not even realize they are doing it.
    Agree, and this is a completely valid point. Most shooters, IMO, have so much to learn that this is a small risk to their overall preparedness, however. A far bigger risk is not knowing their weapons won't fire the ammo they have loaded in them. The sting of dramatic (and eternally long) malfunctions on the clock really helps with getting the message.
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