Mental vs Physical Training

Mental vs Physical Training

This is a discussion on Mental vs Physical Training within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Let me start off by clearing up front, that I am not advocating that Mental training is a suitable replacement for Physical training, having gotten ...

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Thread: Mental vs Physical Training

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
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    Mental vs Physical Training

    Let me start off by clearing up front, that I am not advocating that Mental training is a suitable replacement for Physical training, having gotten that out of the way.

    I did some looking around on the net about something I remember hearing a little about years ago. Some studies were done to show that Mentally imprinting planned action, can help improve ones ability to perform that action in real life. IT DID take learning that action in real life first, and then while continually practicing it physically, some "mostly athletes" were able to duplicate their "developing muscle memory" to a specific action, by mentally duplicating that action in great detail.


    Again, I'm not advocating that anyone give up, or replace quality range/training time to sit at home on the couch and imagine they are training, and consider it the same. But is anyone here familiar with this, and is it limited to only "muscle memory" per say.

    It also seems very likely, should this work, that it would just as easily be able to develop bad skills and habits as well.

    I believe one study was done with a couple of sprinters on treadmills, after having been monitored running 100 yards, they sat down and mentally ran the same race, giving almost exactly the same brain wave patterns as when they were physically running.

    Just wondering about how counterproductive it might be to put in hours of good quality practice on the range, and then blow it by mentally shooting it out at the OK corral while sitting at work. Probably a poor example, but hopefully you get the point.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
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    I believe one study was done with a couple of sprinters on treadmills, after having been monitored running 100 yards, they sat down and mentally ran the same race, giving almost exactly the same brain wave patterns as when they were physically running.

    Just wondering about how counterproductive it might be to put in hours of good quality practice on the range, and then blow it by mentally shooting it out at the OK corral while sitting at work. Probably a poor example, but hopefully you get the point.
    I see how it could work with an athlete that does exactly the same thing everytime...such as sprinter in the 100 yard dash. Nothing is going to change for that sprinter except the amount of time that he completes the race in. Im sure that one could sit and visualize every step of the race.

    On the other hand, visualizing the shootout at OK Corral has a few problems with it. One is, that you already know how it took place. Sure you could visualize that, but to be effective, it would have to literally reconstruct every single step exactly the way it happened. Two, is that any change in the pattern could screw up the future response.

    The thing is, is real life, one never knows how events are going to turn out, so visualizing a particular response to a violent altercation has a very limited value. In could be counterproductive in the fact that if you visualize a particular response to a particular action how are you going to react if that particular action in some way changes ? Are you going to immediatley respond with the correct solution or are you going to be thinking about it while be shot, stabbed, beaten or whatever ?

    Visualization only works for a planned pattern with no deviation. I've done it myself many times when shooting steel plates for speed. I mentally draw,fire and duplicate each precise action that it going to take place and I do beleive that it helps to focus and concentrate.

    Using t for anything else like a real time event just has too many variables in it.
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    4myson, sorry but I think we should call and orient this thread Mental AND Physical Training. Both are equally necessary.
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
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    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    Visualization only works for a planned pattern with no deviation. I've done it myself many times when shooting steel plates for speed. I mentally draw,fire and duplicate each precise action that it going to take place and I do beleive that it helps to focus and concentrate.

    Using t for anything else like a real time event just has too many variables in it.
    That's what I was thinking about, obtaining grip, draw, to low ready position, arm to defensive position, etc.

    But then playing in your mind off beat scenarios that don't follow any practical methods, would seem to be counterproductive. I guess the number of times you do that, would determine if it would effect you or not. The OK corral shootout was just an example of an off beat scenario, not intended to be a reinactment.

    Maybe I am overanalyzing this idea, but I guess I just wanted to see how non training time activities may effect our performance as well.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
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    I agree with Hotguns. Also , for me the best way to train to senarios is force on force. You don't know what the other guy is gonna do, you just react.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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    i am a BIG proponent of "mental imprinting" ... but it can only take you so far. of course there's also the flip side of possibly imprinting a bad habit.

    to each their own, but for me, i used mental imprinting on my draw and was impressed with the results. no matter how many times i mentally drew, i never got tired

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