Tactical Reload

This is a discussion on Tactical Reload within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Here's a video we put together on "tactical reload"....

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Thread: Tactical Reload

  1. #1
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Tactical Reload

    Here's a video we put together on "tactical reload".


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    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    I appreciate you posting the video on Tactical Reloads. Many shooters have never been trained nor experienced practicing a tactical reload. I however have a question and a comment...

    Question...A "tac reload" is done after you've been in a fight, to insure that your weapon has a full magazine loaded to continue the fight if necessary...Am I correct?

    I have been taught, in MY training, the acronym of F.A.S.T.... Fight...Assess...Scan...Topoff..... You've had the FIGHT...you ASSESS the situation to see if you need to fight anymore...you SCAN (I was taught a 360 scan)....then you TOPOFF (tactical reload)...

    The scan I was taught was a FULL 360 scan...I notice you just did a 180...What happens if you have more FIGHT coming at you from the rear? Only doing a 180, aren't you leaving yourself open?

    I also was taught, when I topoff, let the mag in the weapon fall free, while accessing the new mag and slamming home. I have small hands and it's a bit difficult to hold both mags between fingers, etc. It might be feasible for me with a single stack mag, however my EDC is a G19, double stack mag...I drop the mag while accessing the new mag, slam it home, squat while keeping my Situational Awareness working, and pick up the mag I dropped. Thoughts?

    Again, thanks for posting, because ALL of us need to be reminded to practice things like this and incorporate scanning into the procedure...
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by First Sgt View Post
    I appreciate you posting the video on Tactical Reloads. Many shooters have never been trained nor experienced practicing a tactical reload. I however have a question and a comment...

    Question...A "tac reload" is done after you've been in a fight, to insure that your weapon has a full magazine loaded to continue the fight if necessary...Am I correct?

    I have been taught, in MY training, the acronym of F.A.S.T.... Fight...Assess...Scan...Topoff..... You've had the FIGHT...you ASSESS the situation to see if you need to fight anymore...you SCAN (I was taught a 360 scan)....then you TOPOFF (tactical reload)...

    The scan I was taught was a FULL 360 scan...I notice you just did a 180...What happens if you have more FIGHT coming at you from the rear? Only doing a 180, aren't you leaving yourself open?

    I also was taught, when I topoff, let the mag in the weapon fall free, while accessing the new mag and slamming home. I have small hands and it's a bit difficult to hold both mags between fingers, etc. It might be feasible for me with a single stack mag, however my EDC is a G19, double stack mag...I drop the mag while accessing the new mag, slam it home, squat while keeping my Situational Awareness working, and pick up the mag I dropped. Thoughts?

    Again, thanks for posting, because ALL of us need to be reminded to practice things like this and incorporate scanning into the procedure...
    Like you Sgt, I have trained the F.A.S.T. way as well. The 180 Degree is for range safety, and we both know its not very realistic. As for the actual reload, I work mine the same as Phoenix demonstrated.

    You hit the nail on the head with your last statement, folks should practice these things.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

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    Thanks for posting the vid.

    In my personal opinion, a tactical reload is rarely necessary in the civilian SD setting, but it doesn't hurt to know how to do it properly.

    Just like holstering your handgun, it does not need to be done at high speed. It should certainly be done efficiently, but it does not need to be like lightening. You are "topping off" AFTER you have assesed the situation to be at least relatively safe. If it isn't safe, there is absolutly NO reason to do it.

    First Sgt, how about this method. Rather than dropping the partial mag on the deck, pull it from the gun with your support hand on the way back for the fresh mag. You can tuck it in a pocket or behind your belt. I have found this method almost as smooth as juggling two mags and it prevents that partial mag from impacting a hard surface or getting dirt in a mag that MAY be reused in the fight.

    OP, this is just a civilian Joe off the street saying this, but if I am still scanning and looking for active threats, ain't no way I am holstering my handgun. If I have assesed the situation and have determined that it is safe to reholster, I will always "look" the gun back in. It is all well and good for the arm and hand to know how to do it, but I usually like to give them a little supervision - just to be safe.
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    Member Array urkrypt0nite's Avatar
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    I can see the logic behind letting the original magazine fall, but if I'm not under duress then I'd take the time to hold onto that mag and place it in my mag holster/pocket/whatever. Otherwise you'll have to look down and pick it up, ripe for a attack.

    Now, if I start taking fire I might let it drop because my concern is solely on putting more bullets in my gun to engage the threat.

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    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thanks much for watching. I mention that the tactical reload should be done when there is a definitive lull in the fight or if you're behind cover. There is definitely a full 360 scan to ascertain that there is in fact such a lull, otherwise, you can not execute a tactical reload as you may be engaged from different angles. Again, my video presupposes a scan, but I should have been more clear. I will definitely add a comment to this effect on the video.

    I really appreciate your comments. Waiting for someone to point out that I need a new camcorder (it has seen better days):)

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    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRunner71 View Post
    OP, this is just a civilian Joe off the street saying this, but if I am still scanning and looking for active threats, ain't no way I am holstering my handgun. If I have assesed the situation and have determined that it is safe to reholster, I will always "look" the gun back in. It is all well and good for the arm and hand to know how to do it, but I usually like to give them a little supervision - just to be safe.
    We teach re-holstering slowly, after all, no one won a gunfight re-holstering fast. Also, in the event there is an obstruction in the holster, I can feel it if I go slow. I see many videos of people slamming the gun into the holster.

    Obviously, if you are still on red alert, you will not re-holster your handgun...this is a given. I was merely making a point. Once you have ascertained that the fight is over, I still do not see the need to look at the holster during re-holstering (I want my senses focused on my environment). Again, it's a training issue. If you do it enough, you will not have to look. The operative word is slow...as such, you can always thread the cavernous holster with your handgun. Thank you for your comment and for watching.

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    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRunner71 View Post
    First Sgt, how about this method. Rather than dropping the partial mag on the deck, pull it from the gun with your support hand on the way back for the fresh mag. You can tuck it in a pocket or behind your belt. I have found this method almost as smooth as juggling two mags and it prevents that partial mag from impacting a hard surface or getting dirt in a mag that MAY be reused in the fight.
    You can definitely do a reload with retention. I suggest that once you've completed it, you take the magazine out of your pocket and put it back in the magazine pouch...easier to find in case you need it.

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    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by First Sgt View Post
    I also was taught, when I topoff, let the mag in the weapon fall free, while accessing the new mag and slamming home. I have small hands and it's a bit difficult to hold both mags between fingers, etc. It might be feasible for me with a single stack mag, however my EDC is a G19, double stack mag...I drop the mag while accessing the new mag, slam it home, squat while keeping my Situational Awareness working, and pick up the mag I dropped. Thoughts?

    Again, thanks for posting, because ALL of us need to be reminded to practice things like this and incorporate scanning into the procedure...
    As suggested in this thread, you may opt for a reload with retention. Squatting down and looking for a magazine is challenging enough during daylight (forces you to take your eyes off your surroundings), let alone at night. The knowledge that most people shoot low is not comforting when squatting unless the action is done for a tactical purpose other than locating a dropped magazine.

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    Senior Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    First Sgt., like the others, I am also in-favor of you going to a "reload with retention," especially if all you have on your person is one spare magazine - with more than one, I'd say that the retention becomes a luxury, but still, one never knows (hence "check-360"), right?

    With that said, I also have smaller hands. A pair of size 8 and 1/2 surgical gloves fits me literally skin-tight.

    I'm wondering exactly which portion of the tactical reload, with double-stackers, is giving you problems. For me, since I'm a newer shooter, it was a lack of understanding of the finer mechanics of the execution of the tactical reload that was actually what was causing me problems. For one, I was anticipating receiving the partially spent magazine from the pistol just a bit too much, and thus did not have a good high grip - with a lack of correspondingly deep seating of the magazine's base in my palm - in indexing the incoming full magazine. This caused the incoming magazine to bobble, which then leads to further insecurity in gripping the outgoing magazine....

    Getting a full purchase on the incoming magazine, properly indexing it as with any other reload, is critical, and it literally took me a year and a half - until this summer's 6 days that I spent with Chris Costa - for me to realize this fundamental error.

    Also, something else that really helped was DRM's advice to "drop the gun on the full magazine," instead of trying to raise the magazine up into the magwell.

    Not sure that will help you, but it's worked for me, and I just thought that I'd pass it along.

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    VIP Member Array 40Bob's Avatar
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    A tactical reload can be a real life saver. I would only do it from cover, not just a lull in the fighting. Back in the revolver days we were taught "continuity of fire" Fire 2 reload 2 etc. I carried loops and speed loaders.

    The only question I have is why do you press your non gun hand to your chest? I have always trained to keep it lower nearer to the gunbelt.
    My rifle and pistol are tools, I am the weapon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 40Bob View Post
    A tactical reload can be a real life saver. I would only do it from cover, not just a lull in the fighting. Back in the revolver days we were taught "continuity of fire" Fire 2 reload 2 etc. I carried loops and speed loaders.

    The only question I have is why do you press your non gun hand to your chest? I have always trained to keep it lower nearer to the gunbelt.
    Our count 2 of the draw is high, therefore placing my support hand high on the chest/sternum allows for my firing hand and support hand to be in line making for an easy melting of the support hand on the gun prior to extension towards the target. I don't want to chase the gun with my support hand. Also, having a high starting point allows me to acquire my sights much earlier as I extend straight to the target (assuming one doesn't bowl or fish). Just one way of doing...there are many. Thanks for watching.

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    Thanks for posting.
    Have Fun and Shoot Straight !!

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    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWO GUNS View Post
    Thanks for posting.
    Thank you!

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    VIP Member Array 40Bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixTS View Post
    Our count 2 of the draw is high, therefore placing my support hand high on the chest/sternum allows for my firing hand and support hand to be in line making for an easy melting of the support hand on the gun prior to extension towards the target. I don't want to chase the gun with my support hand. Also, having a high starting point allows me to acquire my sights much earlier as I extend straight to the target (assuming one doesn't bowl or fish). Just one way of doing...there are many. Thanks for watching.
    Ok that makes sense. The draw I use is; As soon as I clear leather, the gun is pivoted to horizontal, this allows for quick shots from retention. The gun is then puncher forward, much the same as you describe, I just start lower.
    My rifle and pistol are tools, I am the weapon.

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