Emergency Reload

Emergency Reload

This is a discussion on Emergency Reload within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; BTW, when inserting the magazine into the handgun, sometimes I give it a very quick glance and sometimes I keep my eyes on the threat ...

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Thread: Emergency Reload

  1. #1
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Emergency Reload



    BTW, when inserting the magazine into the handgun, sometimes I give it a very quick glance and sometimes I keep my eyes on the threat (versatility is a bonus)...as follows:



    My wife edited the above video and insists that "Hell's Bells" is a good track for it. :)

    Will post engagements from concealment soon.
    Last edited by PhoenixTS; September 22nd, 2012 at 10:56 PM.


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    Sorry about the bad link...fixed.

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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    I really like the open-ended way you've presented the slide-lock/emergency reload. There's no dogma, instead flexibility (sometimes focusing on the threat - other times, focusing more on getting the gun back into the fight as fast as possible) and skills as based on the shooter's reality (i.e. using the slide-stop/release as based on the shooter's skill level and training) are emphasized.

  4. #4
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thanks for watching! Find out what works for you...and then evolve.

    Quote Originally Posted by TSiWRX View Post
    I really like the open-ended way you've presented the slide-lock/emergency reload. There's no dogma, instead flexibility (sometimes focusing on the threat - other times, focusing more on getting the gun back into the fight as fast as possible) and skills as based on the shooter's reality (i.e. using the slide-stop/release as based on the shooter's skill level and training) are emphasized.

  5. #5
    Member Array Steve261's Avatar
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    Nice to see the slide stop method. If you can manipulate the trigger, if you can hit the magazine release, if you can walk and chew bubble gum, there is no reason you cannot use the slide stop/release method.

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve261 View Post
    Nice to see the slide stop method. If you can manipulate the trigger, if you can hit the magazine release, if you can walk and chew bubble gum, there is no reason you cannot use the slide stop/release method.
    Except when your hands and finger loose all feeling because of blood lose.....If you do one thing all the time, you will be more consistent. Switching things around can cause uncertainty and can get you killed.....The OP brought up both ways of getting the weapon back into battery. I prefer over the top. Its can be done in almost all situations.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array Bad Bob's Avatar
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    I prefer the slide stop method, but I am proficient with both. That is what it is for.
    My rifle and pistol are tools, I am the weapon.

    “Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.”
    - H. G. Wells -

  8. #8
    Member Array Sgt45's Avatar
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    For me it depends on the gun. My HK .45c is much faster using the slide stop, the FN FNP 45 is a bear doing it that way and over the top is the only way to go, the 1911 is usually slide stop, Springfield XD 45 is over the top. I don't carry the FN or the XD so I'm used to the slide stop method.

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 40Bob View Post
    I prefer the slide stop method, but I am proficient with both. That is what it is for.
    You would LOL.....When I call you later I tell you what I really think....
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......

  10. #10
    Member Array Poseidon's Avatar
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    Nice video man only think i was taught differently is to back away at the angle and not straight back
    Last edited by Poseidon; September 27th, 2012 at 03:32 PM.

  11. #11
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thanks for watching.

    Here's another one:



    Your environment will dictate your movement...narrow alley or hallway, wall to immediate left or right...at contact distances you may have to grab the attackers weapon/arm hence moving forward/toward the threat...etc

    Quote Originally Posted by Poseidon View Post
    Nice video man only think i was taught differently it to back away at the angle and not straight back
    Poseidon likes this.

  12. #12
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Although I don't want to oversimplify using the slide stop method as it requires good training, I do tend to agree with you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve261 View Post
    Nice to see the slide stop method. If you can manipulate the trigger, if you can hit the magazine release, if you can walk and chew bubble gum, there is no reason you cannot use the slide stop/release method.

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    Member Array Steve261's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryball View Post
    Except when your hands and finger loose all feeling because of blood lose.....If you do one thing all the time, you will be more consistent. Switching things around can cause uncertainty and can get you killed.....The OP brought up both ways of getting the weapon back into battery. I prefer over the top. Its can be done in almost all situations.
    And if your hands and fingers loose the feeling from blood loss, you won't be able to pull the trigger either. I agree that all methods should be learned. When I instruct, I demonstrate all methods and tell the shooter to find the one that works best for them, but to KNOW all three. Too many people use the "oh, you won't be able to hit the slide stop/release under stress". But we want you to manipulate the trigger correctly, we want you to hit the teeny-tiny mag release, we want you to be able to hit the decocker, we want you to be able to do a tactical/retention/emergency reload, etc. Everything except the slide stop/release, that you won't be able to do!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array sensei2's Avatar
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    for myself, i prefer to slingshot the slide to release it, rather than pressing the slide stop/release lever.

    my reasons are two:

    1. it's a universal method. the operator needn't know exactly where the slide stop/release is located. more importantly, a few guns, such as the Walther PP family, and the Beretta Nano, don't have slide stop/release levers at all. i realize that this becomes a factor only when one is shooting an unfamiliar pistol.

    2. pulling the slide back to release it gains me perhaps an eighth of a inch more slide travel distance, which makes it slightly more likely that the slide will go fully into battery.

    people who have experimented with this (Mas Ayoob, Duane Thomas, and, i suspect, most IPSC competitors), have determined that hitting the slide stop/release lever is faster than slingshotting the slide.

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve261 View Post
    And if your hands and fingers loose the feeling from blood loss, you won't be able to pull the trigger either. I agree that all methods should be learned. When I instruct, I demonstrate all methods and tell the shooter to find the one that works best for them, but to KNOW all three. Too many people use the "oh, you won't be able to hit the slide stop/release under stress". But we want you to manipulate the trigger correctly, we want you to hit the teeny-tiny mag release, we want you to be able to hit the decocker, we want you to be able to do a tactical/retention/emergency reload, etc. Everything except the slide stop/release, that you won't be able to do!
    I teach the same way, then end up back at tap/rack. Ill leave the slide stop/release in the competition world for now. I teach this the same way Gomez does...

    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......

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