Drawing while moving - Page 2

Drawing while moving

This is a discussion on Drawing while moving within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Lateral movement:...

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  1. #16
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    Lateral movement:

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  2. #17
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    Years ago, prior to carrying and during the first couple years of carrying, I participated in numerous IPSC style competitions in which various shoot-while-moving and draw-while-moving elements were part of the course. It can be an eye-opener how different it is, particularly when dealing with cover. And on an IPSC style course there isn't even any FoF type threats to deal with.

    It can be a bit like walking, talking and chewing gum, as some suggest.
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    Earlier this year I had the chance to do a "Shoot with SWAT" at my local membership range. The first course was a square layout with 3 targets at the end. Walking toward the targets was two handed, left to right across the targets was weak hand, moving back from the targets was two handed, walking right to left across the targets was strong hand only. I watched the first couple of folks who barely moved so the RO pulled them thru the course. I got up and dragged the RO thru the course. BTW, the winner was who could get the most hits on the three targets including reloading while moving. I did not win, but had a blast as I have done moving and shooting many times before.
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  4. #19
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    Also, there is a trick to only moving your lower body, while remaining as steady as possible with the upper body while firing...Another reason to practice movement so that you can master this skill...JMO
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  5. #20
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    It would seem to me that if you are serious about defensive use of a firearm, you should be able to draw while moving in any direction.

    And...since our everyday environment isn't nice and flat like a shooting range, I would also count on tripping and falling...learning to shoot from the ground is probably a good idea as well.

  6. #21
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    I just now re-uploaded a old video I did from a year ago.

    While the above video you posted is fun, I can't really see any training value in it other than learning to draw.
    As others have pointed out well; lateral movement is probably the better way to use your time at the range if allowed.

    In a deadly threat situation, the video I posted here is precisely how I would handle it. (Range approx 30 feet)
    Draw and shoot, draw and shoot? I'm not a "one shot Charlie."

    I will fire at the rate you see in the video until the threat has been neutralized.
    While I agree shot placement is crucial; I can not always see where my shots hit...there for, I continue to
    fire until the threat is down. You'll see in the video two of my 5 shots were not critical hits.

    I've read much about foot work.

    As a long time martial artist, I find the "stutter step" shown in some defensive videos I've seen inappropriate in defensive shooting or for ANY lateral movement.

    I intentionally shot this video in somewhat deep grass. The "Stutter Step" is a poor choice as dragging my feet will cause un-necessary "jerking" as my feet grab the tufts of grass. This bouncing motion will cause inaccuracy IMO.

    You will notice in the slo-mo in this video, I practice crossing of the feet (in front). Pushing back on my left foot continues to afford me retreat motion if needed.





    Last edited by RightsEroding; December 10th, 2012 at 09:47 AM. Reason: error in wording
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  7. #22
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    Being in the military we do things a little different. Close contact we attack the ambush or move towards it

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=km0VzvKyRaw

  8. #23
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    Thanks for your comment and video. Nice and accurate shooting.

    My post was intended to demo drawing while moving. There certainly is an application for it as you may be moving backwards, laterally, diagonaly or forward and may have to engage. I am doing it very slow as I was working on accuracy (one shot drill). Normally I would fire until the threat is stopped.

    Here's one example:



    Your movement is very unstable and does not allow for fast or safe movement, especially to cover. If you take a FOF class, you may get the first hit, but with that pace of movement, you will be hit repeatedly. You want your feet to move in the direction you are traveling. The reason for moving heel/toe or toe/heel is to be able to feel if something is in your way.

    We shoot from every conceivable angle and position. Working diagonally, forward and laterally are basic tenets of every training methodology. You have to train in a manner to have the tools at your disposal depending on the situation. That's why you have to be able to shoot going forward, lateral, diagonal and to the rear.

    Quote Originally Posted by RightsEroding View Post
    I just now re-uploaded a old video I did from a year ago.

    While the above video you posted is fun, I can't really see any training value in it other than learning to draw.
    As others have pointed out well; lateral movement is probably the better way to use your time at the range if allowed.

    In a deadly threat situation, the video I posted here is precisely how I would handle it. (Range approx 30 feet)
    Draw and shoot, draw and shoot? I'm not a "one shot Charlie."

    I will fire at the rate you see in the video until the threat has been neutralized.
    While I agree shot placement is crucial; I can not always see where my shots hit...there for, I continue to
    fire until the threat is down. You'll see in the video two of my 5 shots were not critical hits.

    I've read much about foot work.

    As a long time martial artist, I find the "stutter step" shown in some defensive videos I've seen inappropriate in defensive shooting or for ANY lateral movement.

    I intentionally shot this video in somewhat deep grass. The "Stutter Step" is a poor choice as dragging my feet will cause un-necessary "jerking" as my feet grab the tufts of grass. This bouncing motion will cause inaccuracy IMO.

    You will notice in the slo-mo in this video, I practice crossing of the feet (in front). Pushing back on my left foot continues to afford me retreat motion if needed.





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  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixTS View Post

    Your movement is very unstable and does not allow for fast or safe movement, especially to cover. If you take a FOF class, you may get the first hit, but with that pace of movement, you will be hit repeatedly.
    Well; I suppose you need to use what you feel works for you.
    The "pace" is just about right to 1) maintain accuracy and 2) force the approaching attacker with gun/knife to close range less easily by angular adjustments.

    I would enjoy seeing a demo of anyone running at a higher speed laterally and hitting anything.

    A threats movements will dictate the defense's dynamic response.
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  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by RightsEroding View Post
    Well; I suppose you need to use what you feel works for you.
    The "pace" is just about right to 1) maintain accuracy and 2) force the approaching attacker with gun/knife to close range less easily by angular adjustments.

    I would enjoy seeing a demo of anyone running at a higher speed laterally and hitting anything.

    A threats movements will dictate the defense's dynamic response.
    In the end it is what works for you.

    I'm of the school of thought to move in the direction your feet are pointing. It's much faster and every bit as accurate.

    Regarding your last statement..... A threats movement is only a fraction of what dictates your dynamic response as you put it. What about bystanders, your family, cover, injuries already sustained, exit out of a building and so forth?
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  11. #26
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    Lateral movement when you draw or make mag changes. Remaining static is not good. But I don't see the point in this drill. I can see draw with lateral movement and continuing to fire while backing up trying to put some distance between you and the threat, but why would you shoot one round and reholster? Don't want that in my muscle memory banks.
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  12. #27
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    Lateral movement when you draw or make mag changes. Remaining static is not good. But I don't see the point in this drill. I can see draw with lateral movement and continuing to fire while backing up trying to put some distance between you and the threat, but why would you shoot one round and reholster? Don't want that in my muscle memory banks.
    I agree, back peddling in a gun fight is not going to save you. Any distance gained is insignificant. I train to explode off the X diagonally towards the BG's strong side circling, forcing him to adjust and reacquire.

    I had a friend in the revolver days who was stabbed by a BG on top of him. He drew double tapped the BG and holstered as per the qual course. Fortunately his aim was true and he was using a 357 Magnum.
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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 40Bob View Post
    I agree, back peddling in a gun fight is not going to save you. Any distance gained is insignificant. I train to explode off the X diagonally towards the BG's strong side circling, forcing him to adjust and reacquire.

    I had a friend in the revolver days who was stabbed by a BG on top of him. He drew double tapped the BG and holstered as per the qual course. Fortunately his aim was true and he was using a 357 Magnum.
    While employing your above technique, have you considered practicing with a no-shoot background? When you change the angle of engagement, you may suddenly find yourself with a different background.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMB View Post
    While employing your above technique, have you considered practicing with a no-shoot background? When you change the angle of engagement, you may suddenly find yourself with a different background.

    Just some food for thought...situation ....you are within arms reach of the BG who needs to be shot or you die. You have a no-shoot background. DO YOU shoot or die??
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    Good practice for Zombie attacks.
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