Drawing while moving

This is a discussion on Drawing while moving within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Just working on accuracy while moving at a slow pace out to 16 yards....

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 41
Like Tree10Likes

Thread: Drawing while moving

  1. #1
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    305

    Drawing while moving

    Just working on accuracy while moving at a slow pace out to 16 yards.


  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    charleston, SC
    Posts
    1,855
    I read thread, watched video and want to know what exactly is the point and what am I suppose to do with it now that you showed me you are good at such a tactic. Just do not get it unless I am suppose to clap.
    BenGoodLuck likes this.

  4. #3
    VIP Member
    Array WHEC724's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    6,448
    'Certainly a lot better than I can do while backing up. Although I find moving to the side much more difficult, but a better evasive tactic if you're not in a funnel.

    Walking and chewing gum sometimes challenges me; so given that I'm not constantly training, I find that if I get off the 'X' first, I can then draw and fire with a lot better accuracy and consistency. 'Sort of a common schlep's tactic for survival.
    Last edited by WHEC724; December 5th, 2012 at 04:53 PM.
    __________________________________
    'Clinging to my guns and religion

  5. #4
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,451
    I practice firing while moving laterally to the target much more than I practice advancing or retreating on the target
    WHEC724 and 40Bob like this.
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  6. #5
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    305
    Quote Originally Posted by kelcarry View Post
    I read thread, watched video and want to know what exactly is the point and what am I suppose to do with it now that you showed me you are good at such a tactic. Just do not get it unless I am suppose to clap.
    No need to clap. It helps to be able to draw and engage while moving.

    If one wants to excel in any martial art, one must eliminate anger. It's anger that taints one's judgment and tenses one up when a clear mind is necessary.

    I thank you for your watching and taking the time to comment.
    QKShooter likes this.

  7. #6
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    305
    Lateral movement left or right depending on environment is an effective way to reset your adversary's OODA loop. Also, lateral movement (one handed) is extremely fast. You should train moving back as well since your environment may dictate moving as such. You may even have to move into or attack your adversary depending on proximity and if your adversary is in the process of drawing a weapon and attacking you. I have videos of lateral movement but it may be perceived as advertising since it is in a class format. I will download a video of lateral movement. Thanks much for watching and commenting.

    Quote Originally Posted by pgrass101 View Post
    I practice firing while moving laterally to the target much more than I practice advancing or retreating on the target

  8. #7
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    305
    You are correct, the first step is evasive tactics by way of movement coupled with drawing your handgun and firing. Lateral movement is much faster in myopinion and makes you a more difficult target. Thanks for watching and commenting.

    Quote Originally Posted by WHEC724 View Post
    'Certainly a lot better than I can do while backing up. Although I find moving to the side much more difficult, but a better a evasive tactic if you're not in a funnel.

    Walking and chewing gum sometimes challenges me; so given that I'm not constantly training, I find that if I get off the 'X' first, I can then draw and fire with a lot better accuracy and consistency. 'Sort of a common schlep's tactic for survival.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Array Luis50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    508
    Good stuff. I like any training that takes me out of my comfort zone. Thanks for posting.
    Pistology likes this.
    Luis

    "Everybody's got a plan, 'til they get hit".

    Mike Tyson

  10. #9
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,451
    Granted that moving laterally as well as moving toward or away from the target is a good thing to practice too. The reason I practice moving laterally more is that it is harder for me to get consistent hits will moving laterally than moving is a straight line to or from the target.
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  11. #10
    Member Array jeepzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    northeast Ohio
    Posts
    20
    I thought one of the basic emotions of personal defense (Jeff Cooper) is anger growing to rage. Anger fuels the aggressiveness, speed and ruthlessness needed to surprise and defeat the enemy. Thankfully, I have never had to get that angry.

  12. #11
    Member Array nathanjns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Behind the Sights
    Posts
    309
    I'm not an instructor or even what I would consider to be a well trained shooter, so please consider my comments to be a legitimate question. It seems to me that trying to walk backwards ( especially if it is done hurriedly ) is a good way to get tangled up and fall down. It is also a good way to bump into something you don't know is there and fall down ( especially in the dark ). I, like some of the others who have posted, practice moving laterally while placing accurate fire onto the target. I find that I can move laterally pretty quickly ( kind of a fast shuffle ) while still firing rapidly. When I need to move in a rearward direction, I turn so that I can move laterally in that direction, firing one handed as I go. I move forward while shooting in the same manner as anyone else would. Do you think I should change?

  13. #12
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    305
    Here's what I'm talking about. Anger channeled properly is a good thing (controlled anger), but anger that consumes you even on the internet is not productive. Who is more intimidating, the guy yelling and screaming at you while he leaves his vehicle and walks over to you or the guy who walks up to you with a level head and confidently asks you if there's a problem while maintaining alpha eye contact. You have to be in control of your faculties. Anger at all times will ultimately get you in trouble. Some people go through life angry...relax. Jeff Cooper was talking about an anger response as opposed to fear WHEN ATTACKED...not as a way of life. Sorry I was not clear.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeepzilla View Post
    I thought one of the basic emotions of personal defense (Jeff Cooper) is anger growing to rage. Anger fuels the aggressiveness, speed and ruthlessness needed to surprise and defeat the enemy. Thankfully, I have never had to get that angry.
    Pistology likes this.

  14. #13
    VIP Member
    Array Mike1956's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Marion County, Ohio
    Posts
    10,162
    Quote Originally Posted by nathanjns View Post
    I'm not an instructor or even what I would consider to be a well trained shooter, so please consider my comments to be a legitimate question. It seems to me that trying to walk backwards ( especially if it is done hurriedly ) is a good way to get tangled up and fall down. It is also a good way to bump into something you don't know is there and fall down ( especially in the dark ). I, like some of the others who have posted, practice moving laterally while placing accurate fire onto the target. I find that I can move laterally pretty quickly ( kind of a fast shuffle ) while still firing rapidly. When I need to move in a rearward direction, I turn so that I can move laterally in that direction, firing one handed as I go. I move forward while shooting in the same manner as anyone else would. Do you think I should change?
    The OP's video didn't actually demonstrate his foot movement, but if you listen, you can hear his feet dragging, a la moonwalk as he backs up. This will allow him to feel any obstacles behind him without stumbling over them. There are several legitimate reasons for staying square to the target with a two-handed grip at all times while moving.
    Pistology likes this.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
    Tuco

  15. #14
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    305
    Very good question.

    Regardless of whether you move laterally or backwards, your eyes are in the direction of the threat. I'm not going to get into point shooting versus sight shooting, just a matter of the direction at which your eyes are focused. I do not think you are shooting while looking in the direction you are moving...ie laterally. Remember, your ballistic signature is on every round so you do not want to indiscriminately fire rounds off...know your target and what's beyond it.

    When moving back or forward, you want your feet to have as much contact with the ground as possible with your feet close to eachother...hence a "moon walk" of sorts. When moving back your feet move toe/heel. When moving forward your feet move heel/toe. This fashion of movement allows you to feel anything that's in your way thus minimizing tripping...curbs, skateboard etc. You can't look down as you move as your focus is on the threat...this problem magnifies at night.

    Moving laterally is much faster and you will gain further distance per round fired. To demonstrate this I will do a video shooting 4 rounds as fast as I can moving both laterally and rearwards this weekend.

    Thanks much for your comment.

    Quote Originally Posted by nathanjns View Post
    I'm not an instructor or even what I would consider to be a well trained shooter, so please consider my comments to be a legitimate question. It seems to me that trying to walk backwards ( especially if it is done hurriedly ) is a good way to get tangled up and fall down. It is also a good way to bump into something you don't know is there and fall down ( especially in the dark ). I, like some of the others who have posted, practice moving laterally while placing accurate fire onto the target. I find that I can move laterally pretty quickly ( kind of a fast shuffle ) while still firing rapidly. When I need to move in a rearward direction, I turn so that I can move laterally in that direction, firing one handed as I go. I move forward while shooting in the same manner as anyone else would. Do you think I should change?

  16. #15
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    305
    Well said...

    I think one should train moving laterally away from the threat (one handed) as well as with a two-handed grip (straight back). Lateral to the rear movement is much faster and you will gain more distance. You may also need to shoot one-handed due to an injury sustained during the fight (train with both support and firing hand) or to fire rounds as you're fighting another adversary with your support hand. Both have a solid place in one's training arsenal.

    Thanks for your comment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1956 View Post
    The OP's video didn't actually demonstrate his foot movement, but if you listen, you can hear his feet dragging, a la moonwalk as he backs up. This will allow him to feel any obstacles behind him without stumbling over them. There are several legitimate reasons for staying square to the target with a two-handed grip at all times while moving.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

ccw weapon drawing while moving
,
content
,

how to draw a pistol while moving laterally

,
moving off line while drawing pistol
,
moving offline while drawing a firearm
,
ways to move loads laterally
Click on a term to search for related topics.