Weak Hand Draw

Weak Hand Draw

This is a discussion on Weak Hand Draw within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I just got back from the second session of the "Advanced Concealed Carry" class that I'm taking. First off I have to give credit to ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Weak Hand Draw

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    2,147

    Weak Hand Draw

    I just got back from the second session of the "Advanced Concealed Carry" class that I'm taking. First off I have to give credit to the instructor, Terry Tate. He's been an excellent instructor (light-years better than the guy I took the mandatory CCW course for my permit from). We've got a really small class (3 people) so we all get a lot of individualized instruction and don't have to wait long to get our chances at a drill.

    The reason I'm posting about this (aside from wanting to compliment Terry) is I wanted to mention one of the drills we did that really made me think. Aside from the CCW permit course this is my first defensive handgun course, so I don't know how common this is in other instructors' training, but I haven't heard it mentioned before or seen it in any of the books I've read. I have seen/heard people recommend that you should practice shooting with your weak hand, but this goes a bit beyond that.

    The drill starts with you about a yard from the bad guy (a standard silhouette target) and you have to draw and fire as you move backwards (and side to side). The catch is that you can't use your strong hand at all. Maybe you were shot or cut, disabling that arm, maybe you're trying to keep your kid out of the line of fire, but for whatever reason you must draw (from a strong side hip holster) with your weak side hand. He demonstrated the technique: basically you reach over, pull your gun out so the trigger guard clears the holster, pivot it around 180 degrees so it's sitting backwards in the holster (sort of a jackass crossdraw) then get your master grip with the weak hand, pull it out and shoot the BG.

    I had it a little harder than the other people in here I had to take the safety off my v1 USP Compact with the wrong hand. At this point I ought to emphasize that if you have a gun without a safety, like the other two people in the class (one was shooting DA/SA, the other DAO) this drill can be dangerous. It seems like it would be easy to get your finger in the trigger guard while you're turning the gun around, which is probably Terry told us to take our time and not try to do this fast (it's impossible to do this really fast in any event, but given the danger there's no sense rushing it).

    After the demonstration, we all had a chance to go through the drill. I gut my gun turned around, the safety off, and put two slugs though the center of mass (the range wasn't real great, but I thought it was pretty good shooting for my off hand).

    Now I think this drill is really important for two reasons:
    First, now that I've done it once, I know it can be done. If I'm ever in a dangerous situation and need to draw my gun with my off hand I know (and will hopefully remember) how to do it. This isn't something I'm going to practice a lot, because it's never going to be fast or pretty, but knowing what to do in this situation could save my life some day.

    The second, larger lesson of this drill is to keep in the fight, no matter what happens. If the BG cuts me and incapacitates my arm, I'm not going to just sit there and give up. If my gun jams, or I get hurt, or I trip and fall, the BG isn't going to stop attacking just because I'm at some sort of unfair disadvantage due to bad luck. Marquess of Queensbury rules don't apply to a gunfight. I've got to get back in the fight and keep going until the threat is stopped.

    I hope some of you find this as interesting as I did.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    732
    There are a couple of ways to draw with your support side hand. The fastest is just to reach around your back and access the firearm. Some people are not flexible enough or too big to do this, but it works great for me. Work this slowly at first. You need to access the firearm and bring it around with the muzzle pointed at the floor only, not at your feet or your rump and definitely not at the people behind or besides you.

    Another way is reach around the front and draw the gun. Place it on your chest and "roll it" across until you can aquire a firing grip. Not my favorite, but it works.

    Do these with unloaded weapons until you are confident and competent.

    You also need to practice your one handed malfunction clearances and reloads. Let me know if you need the procedures.

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    2,147
    Tried a couple of these during my dry fire practice today.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sweatnbullets View Post
    The fastest is just to reach around your back and access the firearm. Some people are not flexible enough or too big to do this, but it works great for me.
    Even if you're big and inflexible (and I am), this can still work if you've got long arms. I think this would be the best way for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sweatnbullets View Post
    Another way is reach around the front and draw the gun. Place it on your chest and "roll it" across until you can aquire a firing grip. Not my favorite, but it works.
    I tried this and decided there's no way I'm doing this with a loaded firearm. It seems like an invitation to a .45 caliber liposuction. So for be behind the back is preferred, with the jackass crossdraw as a second choice.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array MNBurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    3,019
    My solution is I carry two guns one for each hand.
    MNBurl

    "If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking" - George S. Patton.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array purple88yj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, NC
    Posts
    1,100
    Between my body size and the rake that my handguns sit at, it is near impossible for me to just reach around...front or back.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    732
    I tried this and decided there's no way I'm doing this with a loaded firearm. It seems like an invitation to a .45 caliber liposuction. So for be behind the back is preferred, with the jackass crossdraw as a second choice.
    I agree, I do not like it either. This is commonly taught at some of the more "safety conscientous" training centers, so it is actually an accepted technique.

    One thing to keep in mind is the context of the technique. You are in a fight for your life, you have already been shot in your shooting hand/arm. I believe that the fear of covering yourself might be a very low priority.

    With this in mind, there are even more techniques, some cover yourself and some break the 180 degree rule. But in a fight for your life when you have already been hit.....how high of a priority are the "rules?" This is a user dependent decision. Let me know if you would like some more alternatives.

    Even if you're big and inflexible (and I am), this can still work if you've got long arms. I think this would be the best way for me.
    If you carry at the 4:00 it is even better. For some, you may not get a perfect firing grip. You may have to bring the gun around and on extention, let the gun settle into a firing grip. Also this needs to be practiced from your usual concealment garment. The concealment garment can be a real issue. Which brings us back to the method that you were taught in the original post. The concealment garment is more manageble going around the front.

    Find out what works for you and your particular situation.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array raevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    washington
    Posts
    4,849
    I am a large person, out of shape, not flexible enough to reach accross my belly or behind my back. I have know this for some time( it becomes more apparent as one grows older) this is the reason I have carried 2 guns for a long time. My BUG is a Colt Defender and is carried on my left side. I currently carry it in a pocket of my vest but have been thinking of getting a left hand IWB. Probably will be very uncomfortable. I used to carry SOB and was able to reach the gun from either side. After I hurt my back a couple of times I decided SOB was a danger to my Health and back. A second gun is easier and more sure then trying to reach with the weak hand.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    732
    but have been thinking of getting a left hand IWB. Probably will be very uncomfortable.
    Inside the waistband appendix carry (A-IWB) is really gaining popularity due to FOF training done by Southnarc/Gomez and Suarez International. Right now there is a real push to find a holster maker to make a good A-IWB holster. As it stands there are very few good options in this area.

    The advantage of the A-IWB is that the gun is accesible easily from either hand, while in a gun grappeling situation, while needing and using dynamic movement, and when you just simply can not "be made". The appendix offers very good protection from the inevitable "bump frisk" that can happen in crowded situations. The centerline accesibility has proven itself to have hug benefits in dynamic FOF training.

    I now carry at the appendix about 90% of the time. I am not a very big guy and I carry a full size Glock 17 just to the right of my centerline. This did take some getting use to due to the obvious muzzle positioning. I carry there in a straight drop Don Hume H715M No.36-41/2". While not ideal is does the job fairly well.

    Just another option open to those out there concerned with accesibility from both hands.

  9. #9
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,398
    As mentioned before ~ These days I normally carry a full size firearm horizontal up under my left armpit in an Alessi "pull through" shoulder rig ~ (very fast to draw from AKA No Retention Strap) But, extremely difficult to effectively draw from with my "off hand"
    It CAN be done (and fairly quickly) - and (of course) I have practiced it with my pistol unloaded but, the most effective "draw/presentation" sequence necessitates crossing my own vitals with my carry/defensive firearm.

    That is something that I am willing to risk in an actual defensive scenario but, not in loaded practice or live fire.

    So...(for that reason) I normally pocket carry my BUG over on my left body side so that I might easily opt for that secondary firearm if SHTF.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array Sweatnbullets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    732
    That is something that I am willing to risk in an actual defensive scenario but, not in loaded practice or live fire.
    Absolutely agreed sir!

    Just in case this has not been stressed enough, these techniques need to be practiced with an "absolutely positive" unloaded firearm.

    As we discuss weak hand draws/injured shooter drills, we should not overlook the most basic of these. But this one is cover/static position dependent. Simply reach around the front draw the gun. Place the gun in between the knees/upper legs. Then reacquire the firing grip. Simple, fast, and sure. But the disadvantage is obvious ....you have to be in a static position.

    As you work with these and find the one that is right for you, remember how important mobility is. In between the knees has it's place in my tool book....when I am behind cover.

  11. #11
    Sponsor
    Array AzQkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    In the Superstitions
    Posts
    3,900
    Been appendix carrying full size or snubs for some 30 years now when I felt the need to have the gun immediately accessable due to the dangers of the potential situation I could be walking into while working the streets.

    FoF scenarios reinforce the advantages of that mode of carry as there WILL be gun play or at the least a gun probably drawn. However, I don't feel there is a need to appendix carry 24/7, change my normal strong side IWB/OWB carry method on a daily basis.

    If we were to change the normal modes of daily carry based on FoF scenarios alone, I'd be walking around with a gun in my hand and not have to draw at all.

    The chances of having to draw and fire are slim in the real world, the chances of having to draw the primary gun weekhand are slim as well statistically.

    It's a solution to a problem most will never be in, unless their lives bring them into that realm daily. As stated above, I would carry the primary appendix when the odds of having to draw were high based on the circumstances. For the average ccw carrier, it is negligable at best to change to that mode of carry daily.

    Brownie
    The mind is the limiting factor

    Quick Kill Rifle and Pistol Instructor

  12. #12
    Member Array AgentX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    476
    My agency teaches weak-hand draw just as you were instructed...

  13. #13
    Member Array sailormnop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Tidewater, VA, USA
    Posts
    292
    Please explain appendix carry?
    Check out the Free State Project

    How does the economy really work? Mises Institute

    Laissez Faire Books offers an extensive collection of books on liberty, free markets, philosophy, economics, politics and history.

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    26,960
    Quote Originally Posted by sailormnop View Post
    Please explain appendix carry?
    Essentially, it's carrying the holstered weapon over the appendix area. The corneredcat.com web site shows a simple photo and description. If viewed from a simple anatomy diagram, it would be right above where the incision is made for an appendectomy. Suppostedly better for seated positions, crowds.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  15. #15
    Member Array wheelgunner88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    102

    Weak Hand draw

    This is one of the advantages of Cross draw carry. With a crossdraw holster at 10:00 to 11:00, access is easy with either hand. I know the Cavalry Draw has been discussed and dismissed on another thread, but given the choice between possibly covering yourself and continuing the fight while injured and just rolling over and giving up, I know what I want my choice to be.
    "An armed man is a citizen, an unarmed man is a subject."

    Sights? What are those?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Shooting with your weak hand...
    By 820Larry in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: November 25th, 2008, 01:52 PM
  2. The need to train better with the weak hand
    By packinnova in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: April 19th, 2008, 09:11 PM
  3. Weak hand practice
    By ELCruisr in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: February 17th, 2007, 11:28 PM
  4. Weak hand - and cant
    By P95Carry in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: June 20th, 2006, 01:19 PM
  5. Weak hand draw from strong side???
    By P95Carry in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: August 12th, 2005, 11:17 AM

Search tags for this page

apendix weak hand draw

,
draw weapon weak hand
,
drawing gun weak handed
,
drawing weapon with weak hand
,

weak hand draw

,
weak hand draw holster
,
weak hand drawn
,
weak hand shooting drills
,

weak handed draw appendix carry

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors