Silent Tactical Reload & Reload with Retention - Page 2

Silent Tactical Reload & Reload with Retention

This is a discussion on Silent Tactical Reload & Reload with Retention within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Phoenix Please understand I have a healthy respect for training, trainers, and learning new technique's. Again this technique is just fine. I'm not finding fault, ...

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Thread: Silent Tactical Reload & Reload with Retention

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Secret Spuk's Avatar
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    Phoenix

    Please understand I have a healthy respect for training, trainers, and learning new technique's. Again this technique is just fine. I'm not finding fault, just commenting on what I see. I have had a bit of training myself. One fatal mistake I have learned is to not become visually locked on what my hands are doing during any kind of a reload of a personal weapon. If one must... only glance down at the reload but keep your eye on the adversary. I dont thnk were that far apart in our opinions.

    My second concern is this.... During a ohhhh lets say a shootout. Things happen very very fast. My advice has always been to keep your operation simple, and practice, practice. practice. Until the reloading operation is ingraned in the muscle memory. Adding another method IMO... and only in my opinion would cause to take some concentration from other tasks, and remember another method.

    For a mechanic to have a big tool box with every tool in the book is great... But for a self defender to have to choose from such a large selection could be disasterous. It would be difficult to choose from one or another similar technique in the space of one or two seconds and then exicute.


  2. #17
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    Ummmmmmm..... yeah.....

    I'm not trying to be critical... But.... During this entire operation your eyes were on the gun, and the operation is complicated enough that it requires the shooter look at what he's doing. My experience, and training is that it would be more tactically sound to look to your adversary rather then bury your vision in the gun. Just as your making moves it would be IMO foolish to assume your adversary is not. The other thing is speed... Speed is paramount in a reload while engaged... I know... you said after you've found cover, or during a lul in the fight... In the time it takes to do this silent reload your adversary could be on you... I'd say thats even likely. I know one Police Officer who lost his life that way. My last criticisim is a new or different reload technique will occupy muscle memory space, as well as brain memory space. Switching technique during a stressfull event the memories can become in conflict, or confusied and may cost some concentration to be switched from survival mode, to how did he do that again? mode...

    Please dont consider me to be flaming your technique... It works. I'm just of the KISS school of gunfighting. Learn one technique... perfect it.... use it... when something new or better comes along evaluate it and if you like it... replace the old technique with the new one... Practice until it becomes second nature to you... and so on, and so on.
    Quote Originally Posted by Secret Spuk View Post
    Phoenix

    Please understand I have a healthy respect for training, trainers, and learning new technique's. Again this technique is just fine. I'm not finding fault, just commenting on what I see. I have had a bit of training myself. One fatal mistake I have learned is to not become visually locked on what my hands are doing during any kind of a reload of a personal weapon. If one must... only glance down at the reload but keep your eye on the adversary. I dont thnk were that far apart in our opinions.

    My second concern is this.... During a ohhhh lets say a shootout. Things happen very very fast. My advice has always been to keep your operation simple, and practice, practice. practice. Until the reloading operation is ingraned in the muscle memory. Adding another method IMO... and only in my opinion would cause to take some concentration from other tasks, and remember another method.

    For a mechanic to have a big tool box with every tool in the book is great... But for a self defender to have to choose from such a large selection could be disasterous. It would be difficult to choose from one or another similar technique in the space of one or two seconds and then exicute.
    I have to disagree with you a bit here. I don't think Phoenix is suggesting that this is his usual form of changing a magazine or that this would be appropriate in a "shootout". It's pretty obvious that this technique isn't a replacement for a rapid reload, but it still has its place and can be a valid training tip to a number of users. It might sound like a simple, unnecessary training point, but how many users would have actually considered what it takes to do a silent reload if they hadn't seen this video? I doubt very many. It seems that you are essentially only training for one defensive scenario that requires 3-gun-competitor like speed to put lead on the target as quickly as possible. What about when you've got your family hiding in a closet for multiple attackers in a house, after you've already engaged one. It's possible that in this situation a rapid, loud reload may give away your position.

    Under your same reasoning, one shouldn't even consider practicing a one handed mag change that requires holstering the weapon, because that would be even slower, require more time with your eyes off the target, and learning another technique would make it difficult to choose which method to use.

    I'm glad I saw the video because I had never previously considered the need for such a reload or the correct way to do it.

    Just my opinions of course.

    -Clay

  3. #18
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thanks for your comment.

    I don't know what gives you the impression that I radar lock on my hands or the handgun. If you look at the video I posted entitled "Tactical Reload", you will notice that I do not look at the gun when I execute such reloads. Furthermore, I don't even look at the holster when I re-holster.

    I hear you regarding simplicity. I think if you really like to train and religiously practice (dry and live fire), it's not a bad idea to have some tools in the toolbox...just in case. BTW, this type of reload is not a replacement for a "regular" tac reload or reload with retention...I hope that is clear from the post.

    Again. thanks for your comment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Secret Spuk View Post
    Phoenix

    Please understand I have a healthy respect for training, trainers, and learning new technique's. Again this technique is just fine. I'm not finding fault, just commenting on what I see. I have had a bit of training myself. One fatal mistake I have learned is to not become visually locked on what my hands are doing during any kind of a reload of a personal weapon. If one must... only glance down at the reload but keep your eye on the adversary. I dont thnk were that far apart in our opinions.

    My second concern is this.... During a ohhhh lets say a shootout. Things happen very very fast. My advice has always been to keep your operation simple, and practice, practice. practice. Until the reloading operation is ingraned in the muscle memory. Adding another method IMO... and only in my opinion would cause to take some concentration from other tasks, and remember another method.

    For a mechanic to have a big tool box with every tool in the book is great... But for a self defender to have to choose from such a large selection could be disasterous. It would be difficult to choose from one or another similar technique in the space of one or two seconds and then exicute.

  4. #19
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thank you much for your comment! The reason I came up with this is for situations such as the one you mention below. Your feedback is greatly appreciated!

    Quote Originally Posted by SHTFGearLLC View Post
    I have to disagree with you a bit here. I don't think Phoenix is suggesting that this is his usual form of changing a magazine or that this would be appropriate in a "shootout". It's pretty obvious that this technique isn't a replacement for a rapid reload, but it still has its place and can be a valid training tip to a number of users. It might sound like a simple, unnecessary training point, but how many users would have actually considered what it takes to do a silent reload if they hadn't seen this video? I doubt very many. It seems that you are essentially only training for one defensive scenario that requires 3-gun-competitor like speed to put lead on the target as quickly as possible. What about when you've got your family hiding in a closet for multiple attackers in a house, after you've already engaged one. It's possible that in this situation a rapid, loud reload may give away your position.

    Under your same reasoning, one shouldn't even consider practicing a one handed mag change that requires holstering the weapon, because that would be even slower, require more time with your eyes off the target, and learning another technique would make it difficult to choose which method to use.

    I'm glad I saw the video because I had never previously considered the need for such a reload or the correct way to do it.

    Just my opinions of course.

    -Clay

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