pistol holding question

pistol holding question

This is a discussion on pistol holding question within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; do you put your weak side's index finger over the front of the trigger guard or wrapped around the bottom three fingers of your strong ...

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Thread: pistol holding question

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array AdBro's Avatar
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    pistol holding question

    do you put your weak side's index finger over the front of the trigger guard or wrapped around the bottom three fingers of your strong hand?


  2. #2
    Member Array Steve261's Avatar
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    Looping it over the trigger guard is considered by most to be bad technique.

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    Ex Member Array AdBro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve261 View Post
    Looping it over the trigger guard is considered by most to be bad technique.
    why is that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdBro View Post
    why is that?
    It just compromises the grip on the pistol, as I understand it. I've always been taught to keep all your fingers together folded over the other hand. I can't really see any reason to have one finger way up there, so I've never really tried it.
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  5. #5
    Ex Member Array Jackster's Avatar
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    I wrap it over the fingers of the strong hand

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    Ex Member Array AdBro's Avatar
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    yeah, i think it feels awkward too, but i was wondering if there was some advantage that i didn't know about

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    VIP Member Array RoadRunner71's Avatar
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    I have trained both ways and, personally, I have much better control with fingers together beneath the trigger guard.

    Some think that it helps with controlling muzzle flip. I can only surmise that these folks have a weaker than necessary grip in the first place. With a proper "sandwiching" of the frame between your two hands it really shouldn't be an issue.
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    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
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    No, definately not . when you grip the gun you will pull your shots low left. And one other thing if you will allow me, Your body listens to what you tell it. If you tell it you have a "weak hand" or "weak side" , you will. You have a domonant side or hand, and a support hand. There is nothing "weak" about your left side. It may not be your dominant side, but it is not weak. Just my 2 cents.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRunner71 View Post
    I have trained both ways and, personally, I have much better control with fingers together beneath the trigger guard.

    Some think that it helps with controlling muzzle flip. I can only surmise that these folks have a weaker than necessary grip in the first place. With a proper "sandwiching" of the frame between your two hands it really shouldn't be an issue.
    I find that if I am slightly pushing with my right hand on the grip and slightly pulling back on the trigger guard with my left I have firmer control and quicker and more consistent follow-up shots. I'm also finding I can shoot one-handed almost as well as a result of training that way. Can't tell you why it works, but it works for me.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Array Camjr's Avatar
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    I've seen more people use the trigger guard on some of the very small micro pistols like KelTec P3AT or a Ruger LCP, but on a compact or full size pistol, there is no need to use the trigger guard and it actually compromises control (IMHO).

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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array GhostMaker's Avatar
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    When our department transitioned from revolvers to semi-auto's a good portion of officers tried the trigger guard grip. Not long afterward our instructors began correcting the practice. The reason, for which I agree, is that it decreases overall grip strength and control especially if you have to shoot rapid follow up shots. Additionally, they determined it was also better to have a full grip on the sidearm for weapon retention purposes. I personally find it to be a more stable platform to shoot from, and more natural for the body.
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