Training Scars

Training Scars

This is a discussion on Training Scars within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Maybe I have missed it but I haven't seen a thread on training scars in a long time, if at all. With that said, I ...

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Thread: Training Scars

  1. #1
    Member Array AOK's Avatar
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    Training Scars

    Maybe I have missed it but I haven't seen a thread on training scars in a long time, if at all. With that said, I thought maybe it was an area we could share some of our experiences and learn from.

    In this article written about a year ago Greg Elifritz discusses training scars.

    "In the interests of safety or convenience, we sometimes do things in training that we wouldn’t want to do in combat. If we continue to perform those artificial actions over a long period of time, they become habits. If negative, those habits are called training scars. Sometimes training scars are inconsequential. Sometimes they are fatal"

    https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/ccm...raining-scars/

    What opinions do you have on some of the common training scars he mentions in his article?

    Some current of my current scars I'm focused on correcting:
    Gun/knife disarms- I've gotten into a bad habit of handing back the weapon to the "assailant" immediately after a disarm. As mentioned in the article it's important to integrate h2h skills with firearm training. I have recently been working on finishing the fight whether that means carrying out combatives after a disarm or creating an opportunity to bring my gun into the fight if necessary.

    Movement- I'm not talking about movement while shooting. For me it was continuing to move while scanning and assessing. Many defensive firearm classes get up on a line and just turn our heads or make a little pivot while scanning.

    Quiting after messing up- I see it far to often in classes. The student fouls up their draw or misses the grab during a weapon disarm. Instead of continuing to fight they stop and want to just start over. While this is something I haven't personally had an issue with it is something I am always conscious of regardless in what type of self defense class I am in.

    What are some noteable training scars you have had to correct in the past or are currently working on?
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  2. #2
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    Lightbulb

    GOOD POST!

    I used to have some bad habits, but not anymore. I’ve trained myself out of them. But what I used to do (and I see this often in my classes) is this:

    We shoot a LOT of plate racks here consisting mostly of (6) 8” plates. We do what I call the ”1-2-3” Drill from 10 yards:

    1st Draw, engage one plate

    2nd Draw, engage two plates

    3rd Draw, engage three plates

    Well, most students draw and miss. Then they holster and try again. I used to do that, too. BAD HABIT.

    Stay on on the target until is falls, no matter how many shots it takes, keep shooting until you hit it and it goes down.
    Last edited by DRM; March 5th, 2013 at 03:37 PM.
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  3. #3
    Member Array Moby's Avatar
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    Great read, I need to change some things.
    Psalm 144:1
    Blessed be the Lord, my rock, who trains my hands for war, and my fingers for battle.

    Romans 13:4
    But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword in vain. For he is the servant of God, an avenger who carries out God's wrath on the wrongdoer.

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    Senior Member Array Beans's Avatar
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    The IDPA ETC end of course of fire drill.
    Check to see chamber is empty, point gun is safe direction and pull the trigger then holster.

    On a hot range I have never had this problem, only on a cold range.

    I have caught myself loading a handgun, by inserting a magazine racking the slide to load a round in the chamber then wanting to point it in a safe direction and pulling the trigger before reholstering. Never had it happen yet but it came close a time or two as I loaded the weapon before placing it in my vehicle while still at the range.

    This only comes immediately after shooting a match. so I remind myself that the match is over, the gun is placed in a case unloaded until I am ready to leave the range.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beans View Post
    The IDPA ETC end of course of fire drill.
    Check to see chamber is empty, point gun is safe direction and pull the trigger then holster.

    On a hot range I have never had this problem, only on a cold range.

    I have caught myself loading a handgun, by inserting a magazine racking the slide to load a round in the chamber then wanting to point it in a safe direction and pulling the trigger before reholstering. Never had it happen yet but it came close a time or two as I loaded the weapon before placing it in my vehicle while still at the range.

    This only comes immediately after shooting a match. so I remind myself that the match is over, the gun is placed in a case unloaded until I am ready to leave the range.
    I train and compete quite a bit. I haven't had this particular issue but I didn't want to have any "confusion". I no longer carry the same gun I am competing or training with on that day. Obviously, you need to have more than one gun but, that is a problem most of us cure over time. Anyway, I simply lock up the "carry" piece in the vehicle for the duration of the class or competition and run the gun or guns in my bag. Afterward, I simply pack away those and retrieve the "working" gun from my lock box.
    "Mind own business"
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