Teaching the nephews about home defense.

This is a discussion on Teaching the nephews about home defense. within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've been dancing with an idea here for the past few days, and wanted to know what you think. My nephews are 8 and 6 ...

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Thread: Teaching the nephews about home defense.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array xsigma40cal's Avatar
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    Teaching the nephews about home defense.

    I've been dancing with an idea here for the past few days, and wanted to know what you think.

    My nephews are 8 and 6 yrs old, both with an elementary understanding of proper gun handling and shooting. Though in the event that they would need to exercise those skills in the same manner of other kids we here about in the news, I have my concerns. What I intend to propose to my brother is week long exercise where a 1911 air soft gun will be available to the only the oldest at any given time, and I (playing the part of the of the intruder) will choose a day that is coordinated with my brother and sis-in law where a rather realistic home invasion will be staged. Complete with screaming, panic, barking dogs, and a reasonable amount of rough play, My final target would be either the oldest, or the youngest of the two kids.

    For the purpose of molding the right mindset, I would restrict the defensive response to the oldest, for the youngest may interpret this as a game. I would enter the house with a protective mask, scarf and a wiffle-ball-bat that is painted black and the duty of the oldest is to get where the air soft pistol is stored, load it, find safety with his little brother, or engage me. the main idea is to put him under stress and expect him to perform in the absence of his father and or mother. The end of the exercise will only be called by a designated person wearing a special hat or arm band. Of course this is only an idea and is open for suggestions.

    Some ideas, I have to make this interesting...

    -Sudden loss of power to the house. (Via circuit breaker)

    -Quiet removal of the two dogs they keep.

    -Presence of a strange car in the driveway.

    -Strange phone calls
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    Senior Member Array ExaltedOne's Avatar
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    Before you do this as far as the scenario goes, did you think about the screaming and barking dogs may result in neighbors calling the police and you being drawn upon and possibly shot?

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    Senior Member Array xsigma40cal's Avatar
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    Its a pretty big house that has only one neighbor within 200 yards, with a growing history of break-ins in the area. That kind of isolation drives the point of this kind of practice. Maybe bring that neighbor into the mix as a possible refuge for the kids?
    The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools.--->Herbert Spencer

    Springfield xd 45, Sig Sauer SP2022(9mm),Remington 700(.308), Yugo M10 variant w/IZH Kobra optic,...and lots of ammo for all of 'em.

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    VIP Member Array Ghost1958's Avatar
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    Make sure the kid either knows who you are or all the REAL guns are locked up or accounted for.

    Like they say kids do the darndest things. Like being scared and finding the real rifle
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    At that age, I would try to go slow.

    I like your ideas, however, go appropriate for them. Safety first. To heck with everyone else!

    At least they have someone like you to think about teaching them. Many do not. My complements to you for taking that challenge on, Sir.

    Such transfers of knowledge to those who must be the future masters of our world are what the backbone of our culture is built on.
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    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    I like Anglos idea. I get simulating, but even a simulation is akin to practice vs the game. That being said practice helps if done correctly. I think one of the biggest things you could do is help them with SA. Take em grocery shopping and tell them they need to tell you what 20 people are buying/doing without getting the persons attention noticing them.

    I'm sure there are better ideas, but I already envision myself slapping my kid upside the head the first time he tries to leave the house with headphones in!
    BigJon


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    New Member Array BristolPaulL's Avatar
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    Sorry, but I must disagree. That is much too much at one time and way too young. No one should face that situation until they are at least 24 years old. That’s why kids need parents.
    I am not a good teacher, but I know kids that age cannot make good life and death judgments. At that age they are still basically observers. Teenagers often think they can make those decisions, but how many life and death mistakes can you accept. Most parents just hope the Teens don't kill themselves.
    If you want to train them to survive, do it in small steps and walk through it WITH them, not at them.

    I would recommend you consult a qualified teacher for help with this, but they would probably report you to Social Services.

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    Senior Member Array cn262's Avatar
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    Here's my personal opinion - from a father who has gone through this with my own young children.

    First and foremost, I wanted them to not fear firearms and be safe around them. I started with the Eddie Eagle videos (links below), taught them the Four Rules of Gun Safety, and then let them handle a few empty firearms - teaching them how to do it safely (addressing the curiosity aspect that could get them in the most trouble later on). My wife and I tested them a few times by leaving an empty firearm somewhere where they would find it (and where we were watching) to see what they would do, and the reinforce the good things and point out areas they could have done better. When they were old enough (8 years old) for a nearby outdoor range I took them shooting a .22 rifle and pistol, making this fun and tangible for them.

    Eddie Eagle GunSafe|Eddie Eagle GunSafe
    Learn Gun Safety With Eddie Eagle - YouTube
    safetyrules

    I've talked to them a lot about situational awareness, constantly reinforcing the message and lesson to make it habit (it will be soon forgotten by kids if that isn't done). I've told them not to answer the door for strangers, and what to do when away from us if approached by strangers (which could be a small group of kids that might want to hurt them). I have taught them self-defense (they took Tae Kwon Do at first, and about a year ago I started teaching them the Target Focus Training program which I personally like a lot). They have learned to avoid dark areas in parking lots at night, being aware of feet / people in parking lots, checking-out tellers and others when walking into a store, practicing calling 911, etc. It's really more about preparation than anything else.

    Self Defense Training | Tim Larkin | Martial Arts Training - Target Focus Training

    We have talked about what to do if someone breaks into the house (we have an alarm). One night a year or so ago the alarm went off one night. For the most part everything worked fine, although my youngest child initially went to the loft to see who might be breaking-in. They know where to go, where to hide if necessary, and how to get out of the house if necessary (good for escaping a fire as well). It's all about understanding that bad things can happen and trying to empower them to react in a positive manner - and not about creating fear that could actually be detrimental at that young age.

    There has only been one real time that this was tested. My oldest child (13 at the time) was in a cabin fire last summer. She woke-up, started to panic, and then said that she remembered what I taught her about staying calm and quickly creating a plan. She woke her friend up (the two of them were in a separate cabin - something stupid that we were not aware of when we allowed her to go) and the two of them got out safely. She called me right after they were out, and a minute or so into that call the roof collapsed. I felt completely helpless being so far away, but felt good knowing that without this training one or both girls could have died that night.

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    Distinguished Member Array SCXDm9's Avatar
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    In MY OPINION.... 8 and 6 is why too young for that sort of thing!

    I think you are much more likely to make them worried and afraid of something that has an extremely low chance of occurring.

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