Natural point of aim

Natural point of aim

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Thread: Natural point of aim

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Crowman's Avatar
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    Natural point of aim

    Found this on the internet..... You decide...... It was mentioned in a review of the XD9 by Bryan Hyde...
    Gun Review: Springfield XD-9 | The Truth About GunsThe Truth About Guns

    A simple test to determine how well a pistol works with your natural point of aim: pick a spot on the wall and close your eyes. Aim the unloaded pistol at the spot. Open your eyes. If your sights line up to your chosen spot, a fair idea whether the ergonomics of the pistol are working with you, or against you.
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    Senior Member Array stanislaskasava's Avatar
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    It seems like this would be easier to test with a loaded gun... i.e. pick a target, point the gun without sights, pull the trigger and look at where the hole is.

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    I did not read the article, but as far as natural point of aim goes, I have always believed it to be your most natural and least effort posture, which one can try to determine by the method noted, closing eyes, etc. But, I do not think it has anything to do with the gun. It should apply to all guns. I could be wrong.

    I suppose you would see a difference between different handguns, but I would rather have the gun I think will get the job done and practice quick, point and shoot type aiming. IMO, if you are far enough away that you actually have to use the sights, you perhaps have time to actually aim. (If someone is shooting at you, you probably ought to find cover instead stand in the open and aim.)

    Otherwise, quick draw, quick point and quick shoot...and these skills leverage your natural point of aim the most, IMHO.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crowman View Post
    A simple test to determine how well a pistol works with your natural point of aim: pick a spot on the wall and close your eyes. Aim the unloaded pistol at the spot. Open your eyes. If your sights line up to your chosen spot, a fair idea whether the ergonomics of the pistol are working with you, or against you.
    This is one of the things I test when first handling a gun in a shop. If it's not close to my natural pointing, it's off the list.
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    Distinguished Member Array Bill MO's Avatar
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    This is the reason I carry a XD and not a Glock. Glock points high for me with my natural hold. Can you learn to point any gun? YES! As to learning to point shoot, if the gun is not pointed at your point of aim you are off. Should you be able to point any gun on a parallel line to the ground? Again YES. Just take more time to learn the hold and angle of the wrist.

    But when it happens and the stress of the fight is on, does your body go back to its normal habits of natural point of aim or to your learned hold? I tend to lean to what comes natural as much as I can.
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    I've found that a single action revolver points most naturally for me - neutral wrist position. Snubbies, however, and the LCR in particular, requires the wrist to be canted down somewhat for "natural" point. Autos require some comparatively upward cant, which actually turns out to be mostly neutral.

    I just practice enough to accustom myself to the differences. If I flub it at 3 to 5 yard distance I'm still on within a 6 inch target.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crowman View Post
    A simple test to determine how well a pistol works with your natural point of aim: pick a spot on the wall and close your eyes. Aim the unloaded pistol at the spot. Open your eyes. If your sights line up to your chosen spot, a fair idea whether the ergonomics of the pistol are working with you, or against you.
    Actually you don't need to start with a gun in your hand. Years ago while on an Army pistol team I was taught to do pretty much the same thing when starting a match to adjust the most natural stance in relation to the target. (That was for National Match courses, which is one handed shooting.)
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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    When I'm afforded the luxury of being able to do so, yes, I do try to come to my natural-POA before I pull the trigger for the first time.

    It's just one less thing that I have to "fight."

    Dynamically - even in training - it's hard to arrive at my natural-POA "ahead of time," so my grip, upper body presentation, and lower-body stance are all practiced motions that help me arrive at the best approximation of my natural-POA as-possible.

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    Both my S&W 3 Gens (6906, 4566) point more naturally for me than my Glock 30 does (typically higher) but with practice, I can pick up any of the three and shoot just as badly as the other two.

    Next time I try that test I'm opening my eyes before shooting.
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    Senior Member Array rugergunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crowman View Post
    Found this on the internet..... You decide...... It was mentioned in a review of the XD9 by Bryan Hyde...
    Gun Review: Springfield XD-9 | The Truth About GunsThe Truth About Guns

    A simple test to determine how well a pistol works with your natural point of aim: pick a spot on the wall and close your eyes. Aim the unloaded pistol at the spot. Open your eyes. If your sights line up to your chosen spot, a fair idea whether the ergonomics of the pistol are working with you, or against you.
    This idea works for me. I find that the Glock grip angle works best for me naturally. Strange how that works.
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    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rugergunner View Post
    This idea works for me. I find that the Glock grip angle works best for me naturally. Strange how that works.
    Not strange at all - Vogel has said that he prefers the Glock for its grip angle, which seems to "work better" with his very forward-aggressive grip style.

    Different people will simply have different interactions with the ergonomics of any one particular gun or another.

    I naturally kick slightly high with the Glock. For me, the Grip Force Adapter is a mandatory accessory on Glocks not because of "Glock bite," but specifically since it brings the muzzle down just enough for me, for my grip-angle.

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    That's the approach I used when picking the grip size for my M&P. Checked the POA in this way with each grip and picked the one that was closest.

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