I'm a Jerk(er)

This is a discussion on I'm a Jerk(er) within the Defensive Carry & Tactical Training forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I posted a question a while back about my shot groups being low and to the right of COM and got some great feedback. Much ...

Results 1 to 15 of 15
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By QKShooter

Thread: I'm a Jerk(er)

  1. #1
    Member Array keydet90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    51

    I'm a Jerk(er)

    I posted a question a while back about my shot groups being low and to the right of COM and got some great feedback. Much appreciated. After digesting what was presented here, I believe that my problems is with jerking the trigger. Now my question is, what can I do to overcome this problem? I have been shooting almost weekly since May 06 and don't want to continue with bad habits. Any thoughts or input is appreciated. Just FYI, I am a left handed shooter and I shoot a Glock 23.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    5,133
    Get some snap caps , and do a bit of SLOW dry fire practice every night , take your time with your pull and snap 50 to 100 rnds a night for a week . Then start working up speed allways watching the front sight . Repitition builds muscle memory and there really isnt a short cut to a smoothe pull , but dry fire can be done at home much cheaper than range time LOL .
    Make sure you get full value out of today , Do something worthwhile, because what you do today will cost you one day off the rest of your life .
    We only begin to understand folks after we stop and think .

    Criminals are looking for victims, not opponents.

  4. #3
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,063

    Post

    Please allow me to offer you my Gripmaster rant.
    One of the most important things that any shooter can do to improve both their shooting (in general) and their shooting endurance is to buy a Gripmaster.
    If a shooter just increases his grip on a handgun without increasing his finger strength then that results in tremor-like shaking and often pulling.
    You need to increase finger strength first.
    It is unnatural for the human hand to hold onto an object tightly MINUS the index finger...so you need to greatly increase the strength of the remaining "gripping fingers in order to shoot to your best ability." - Yes, you do.

    Your trigger (index finger) needs to be able to function 100% independently from the remainder of your "gun hand" or the firearm just will not stay on target. Not for very long anyway.
    Increasing individual finger strength makes that a breeze to accomplish.
    Especially with a long "double action pull" - increasing your finger & hand strength gives you a great advantage.
    Buy one!
    Ebay is a great place to buy one at a reduced price.
    Start with either a LIGHT or a MEDIUM (RED Color) strength Gripmaster and do not use it the same day or right before you shoot.
    Any shooter that does not already have one should buy one and at least get to the point where using the MEDIUM is easy.
    I do not sell Gripmasters.
    I do strongly endorse the product as being the best thing since frozen toast to increase general shooting accuracy and endurance.

    Picture Stolen From Ebay
    Vuva3rae likes this.

  5. #4
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    5,133
    good point qk , thanks for chiming in.
    Make sure you get full value out of today , Do something worthwhile, because what you do today will cost you one day off the rest of your life .
    We only begin to understand folks after we stop and think .

    Criminals are looking for victims, not opponents.

  6. #5
    Member Array katmandoo122's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    326
    Since I remember running into the exact same problem when I first started pistol shooting, let me share my experience.

    First, there is a better than even chance the your pull of the trigger isn't so much the problem as your anticipation of the bang. This causes people to FLINCH and it is the flinching that often causes the low shots. Want to catch yourself? Try this: Take out enough rounds to fill your clip and remove one bullet and replace with a snap cap. Without looking at the rounds, fill your mag randomly so that you do not know which round is the snap cap (or have someone else load it for you). Start slow, deliberate firing (say, 5 or 6 seconds per pull or more). More than likely, when you pull on the snap cap (and the gun goes click instead of bang) you will notice the movement.

    OK, next step. Without holding a gun, pretend that you are. Your bottom three fingers are wrapped around an imaginary grip and your trigger finger is inside the guard. Now slowly pull the "trigger" while watching your lower three fingers. In all likelihood, what you will see is that some or all of your bottom three fingers move in concert with your trigger finger...known as milking. It is hard for experience shooters to keep this from happening too, but the tiniest change in your grip can cause deviations in placement. It also tends to cause an anticipate reaction as your muscles try to learn that when your fingers close, the gun goes bang.

    The Gripmaster can help with that. However, what I did was this: I started to grip the gun as tightly as I could. Yes, it cause tremors. Some will say to back off when you see the tremors, but I fired 150 shots tremors and all and my grouping was a lot better. After I started to learn to have a firm grip, I was able to back off a bit, but only after my muscles started to learn the new technique.

    The second to last thing I would remind you of is to focus on the front site. That means that your target is blurry and your rear sites are blurry. Line up on the target and before placing your finger on the trigger, bring your focal point to the front site until everything else blurs and pull the trigger. Fact is that most people don't focus on the front site...they focus on the target or the V of both sites, but you will be amazed how well this works. HOWEVER, in your case it has the added benefit of causing you to think about something other than the gun's bang. I was surprised how hard it was to remember to focus only on the front site and, then, all of a sudden, my gun went bang and I hit the 10 ring.

    Finally, find someone you know and trust (preferrably a woman that is a bit cute and is a target shooter). LIne up on the target, rest your finger on the trigger, and have your friend line her hand up over yours and pull your finger (don't fart...she won't think it's funny!). This removes you from the process of deciding when the round will fire and will teach you what a smooth pull feels like.

    Slow firing with snap caps is good too. Do that a few hundred times and you will learn better trigger control. However, without a tight grip and focus on the front site, anticipation and make the best trigger pull go low.

    Good luck!

  7. #6
    Senior Member Array razorblade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Alexandria, Va
    Posts
    558
    You need to seperate the relationship between your index finger and the rest of your hand. You need to build a relationship between your index finger and your dominant eye (man, I sound like Dr. Phil).
    The Gripmaster will help you do achieve that (as everyone else as said).
    It is an important tool to build the necessary muscles and is less than $15, if I remember correctly.

    Also, lots of dryfiring!!!

  8. #7
    Member Array keydet90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    51
    You folks are the best!!!! That all sounds like good, practical advice and I very much appreciate it. I have the snap caps already, but looks like I need to put them to better use. Also need to acquire a GripMaster. Again, much appreciated.

  9. #8
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    19,630
    Another good drill to do is this; Load your snap caps in with your range ammo. Mix them up good, one per magazine. As your doing your normal range stuff, you will have a "clicker" once in awhile. This will illustrate to you your flinching and other flaws making you shoot low and left. It will also force you to deal with malfunctions.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  10. #9
    Member Array FireMedicRogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Parker, Colorado
    Posts
    38
    Hello, My name is Greg and I'm a Jerker...

    Just starting shooting a Glock 23 (Right Handed) and found my shots to be low and to the left. The responses have given me some good information.

    Is there is anything else to learn or practice for the Right Handed shooter??

  11. #10
    Member Array critterhog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    390
    Thanks, All the info on this I belive is very helpful. I tried most of it before and it does work. Now I think I'll try the gripmaster that's the one thing I haven't tried yet.

  12. #11
    Member Array BigDaddy5's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    50
    Something I haven't seen people mention is to practice BRASS...breathing, relaxing, acquiring the front sight and target, squeezing the trigger slack, and shooting.

    That first S is critical. It's a conscious step that I was overlooking for a while, but it makes a HUGE difference. When you've acquired your front sight, and can tell it's on the target, you have to consciously squeeze the slack of the trigger. What I noticed is that when I didn't do it, my finger was relaxed, and as soon as I went to squeeze the trigger, the muscles in my arm tensed up a little, and it threw off my aim, low and left.

    Focusing on the front sight was another big deal too. I was pretty sure I was focusing on it, until I sat down and made a point to. Turns out, I wasn't, but I wasn't focusing on the target either. I was focusing about halfway inbetween. This can get you over the jerk, because now I actually watch the muzzle flash when I shoot, I can see the purple gasses and such. I just started doing both of these techniques this month, and it's payed off greatly.

    To compare, I was lucky to get a 6" or even a 10" grouping at 21 feet, but the last time I went out I turned a shoebox to swiss cheese at 25 yards.

    Good luck, and if worst comes to worst...it's a great excuse to anybody who'd ask (wife, girlfriend, roommate, whatever) that you need a lot of ammo!

  13. #12
    Senior Member Array cagueits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Puerto Rico
    Posts
    911
    Subscribed.

  14. #13
    Member Array paknheat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    315
    One technique that worked for me was to dry-fire practice with an old double action revolver. I would place a dime on the top strap and aim at a tack i placed on the wall across my room. Any imperfection in your form, or trigger manipulation,would cause the dime to fall off.Just remember to make sure the weapon is unloaded, as the person in the next room may think you a little rude.
    A armed person is a citizen-An unarmed person is a future victim.

  15. #14
    Senior Member Array briansmech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    688
    for the lefthander with the glock, or any auto for that matter, and i imagine for the rightie pullin low lefts, try this - worked for me -:

    focus on holding the gun without your thumb. actually stick your thumb out, if thats what it takes. keep the pad from exerting any force on the side of the handgun.

    the reflexive action taken out by this of curling your fingers, with it resultling in an inward down motion because of the length and precedence of the fingers, should start to become involuntary, and create closer groups.

  16. #15
    Moderator
    Array RETSUPT99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    44,411

    Great Idea...

    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    One of the most important things that any shooter can do to improve both their shooting (in general) and their shooting endurance is to buy a Gripmaster.
    If a shooter just increases his grip on a handgun without increasing his finger strength then that results in tremor-like shaking and often pulling.
    You need to increase finger strength first.
    Especially with a long "double action pull" - increasing your finger & hand strength gives you a great advantage.
    Buy one!
    I do strongly endorse the product as being the best thing since frozen toast to increase general shooting accuracy and endurance.
    Picture Stolen From Ebay
    I had not thought of the 'individual' finger strength builder...
    I'm going to get one of these...

    Thanks...

    ret
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

    ***********************************
    Certified Glock Armorer
    NRA Life Member[/B]

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Some jerk...
    By j21blackjack in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: December 25th, 2008, 01:08 PM
  2. constructive criticism,or nosey jerk?
    By jabo2818 in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: April 15th, 2008, 11:42 AM
  3. Jerk or not?
    By saltysquid in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: January 28th, 2007, 01:36 AM
  4. Catch this total jerk on the web.
    By QKShooter in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: September 19th, 2005, 12:05 PM

Search tags for this page

gripmaster

,

gripmaster tremor

Click on a term to search for related topics.